4

I am trying to create an animated repeating-pattern (diagonal stripes sliding horizontally), as placeholder for a loading block (li in this case).

How can I make the animation smooth/continuous giving the illusion the pattern is infinitely sliding?

  • How to calculate the element width so that the pattern is continuous? (stripes shouldn't look broken/interrupted).
  • How to make it loop looking like it is not restarting but rather sliding infinitely? (the 100% frame should pass to the 0% frame without any glitch)

The goal is to have a class I can add to any block and will visually look like loading/processing.

Note: no JS; pure CSS.

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc(20px * 8); /* how to calculate this, relative to the width (of the pattern or the step), to achieve pattern continuity exactly?
    Of course without doing trying&error to know it should be 24.75px * 8.
  */
  height: 200px;
  background-color: blue;

  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(-45deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px
  );
  animation: loading-slide 1s linear infinite;
  @keyframes loading-slide {
    from { background-position: 0% 0% }
    to { background-position: 100% 0% }
  }
}
<ul>
    <li>test
    <li>test
</ul>

  • 1
    I made a little mistake in the formula below, it's correct now ... I was multiplying with cos which is giving the correct result but not the correct number of stripes. Visually both are equivalent but the division is more accurate – Temani Afif Mar 1 at 11:09
  • 1
    I have edited to include another approach ;) probably easier to handle – Temani Afif Mar 2 at 0:10
  • Thank you for your dedication, daily edits & corrections. That's a great answer ☺️ – Kamafeather Mar 5 at 16:04
6

The correct formula should be (20px / cos(45deg)) * N. Then you can simply make the background-size to be 200% 100% (twice bigger than the element) and you can easily animate from left to right:

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc( (20px / 0.707) * 3); /*cos(45deg) = 0.707*/
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(-45deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  background-size: 200% 100%;
  background-color: blue;
  animation: loading-slide 3s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  from {
    background-position: left;
  }
  to {
    background-position: right;
  }
}

.alt li {
  width: calc( (20px / 0.707) * 6);
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

You can consider any degree and adjust the formula as needed. (20px / cos(90deg - |Xdeg|)) * N with X between -90deg and 90deg

Example with -60deg

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc((20px / 0.866) * var(--n,3)); /*cos(30deg) = 0.866*/
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(-60deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  background-size: 200% 100%;
  background-color: blue;
  animation: loading-slide 3s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  from {
    background-position: left;
  }
  to {
    background-position: right;
  }
}

.alt li {
  --n:6;
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

Example with 30deg

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc((20px / 0.5) * var(--n,8)); /*cos(60deg) = 0.5*/
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(30deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  background-size: 200% 100%;
  background-color: blue;
  animation: loading-slide 3s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  from {
    background-position: left;
  }
  to {
    background-position: right;
  }
}

.alt li {
  --n:12;
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

Example with 80deg

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc((20px / 0.9848) * var(--n,8)); /*cos(10deg) = 0.9848*/
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(80deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  background-size: 200% 100%;
  background-color: blue;
  animation: loading-slide 3s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  from {
    background-position: left;
  }
  to {
    background-position: right;
  }
}

.alt li {
  --n:12;
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

You can clearly identify the trivial case where X=+/-90deg (vertical stripes) and we will have cos(0)=1 thus the formula will be 20px * N. Also when X=0 (horizontal stripes) we will have cos(90deg) = 0 and any width will work since there is no vertical pattern (the formula is no more defined)

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc(20px * var(--n,8)); 
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(90deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  background-size: 200% 100%;
  background-color: blue;
  animation: loading-slide 3s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  from {
    background-position: left;
  }
  to {
    background-position: right;
  }
}

.alt li {
 background-image:repeating-linear-gradient(0deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

What about value outside [-90deg,90deg]?

The above range already cover 180deg and since we are dealing with something symetric, all the value can be represented inside that range.

Example: 110deg is the same as -70deg

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc((20px / 0.9396) * var(--n,8)); /*cos(20deg) = 0.9396*/
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(110deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  background-size: 200% 100%;
  background-color: blue;
  animation: loading-slide 3s linear infinite;
}
.alt li {
  --n:12;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(-70deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  from {
    background-position: left;
  }
  to {
    background-position: right;
  }
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

Example: -150deg is the same as 30deg

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc((20px / 0.5) * var(--n,4)); /*cos(60deg) = 0.5*/
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(-150deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  background-size: 200% 100%;
  background-color: blue;
  animation: loading-slide 3s linear infinite;
}
.alt li {
  --n:6;
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(30deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  from {
    background-position: left;
  }
  to {
    background-position: right;
  }
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

basically we add/remove 180deg until we get inside [-90deg,90deg] in order to be able to apply the formula.


Check this answer for more details about how background-size/background-position works: https://stackoverflow.com/a/51734530/8620333


Another Approach

Here is a complete different idea where you can rely on skew transformation and pseudo element. The trick here is that you don't have to define the width based on the stripes but the stripes will follow the width you will define so it will be easier to handle.

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc( 20px * 3); /* it's only 20px * N */
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  position:relative;
  z-index:0;
  overflow:hidden
}
li::before {
  content:"";
  position:absolute;
  top:0;
  bottom:0;
  left:0;
  width:400%;
  /*we keep 0deg in the gradient*/
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(90deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  transform:skewX(30deg);
  transform-origin:bottom left;
  animation: loading-slide 4s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  to {
    transform: translateX(-50%) skewX(30deg);
  }
}

.alt li {
  width: calc( 20px * 6);
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul class="alt">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

As you can see, we keep a vertical gradient, we define the width of the element based on the width of the gradient. We make the pseudo element big enough and we apply a translation on it. The only thing you need to adjust is the skew transformation to control the degree.

With this approach you will also have better performance since you will animate transform instead of background-size.

More examples:

li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: calc( 20px * var(--n,3)); /* it's only 20px * N */
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom:10px;
  background-color: blue;
  position:relative;
  z-index:0;
  overflow:hidden
}
li::before {
  content:"";
  position:absolute;
  top:0;
  bottom:0;
  left:-400%;
  right:-800%;
  /*we keep 0deg in the gradient*/
  background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(90deg, transparent, transparent 10px, black 10px, black 20px);
  transform:skewX(var(--d,30deg));
  animation: loading-slide 12s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes loading-slide {
  to {
    transform: translateX(-50%) skewX(var(--d,30deg));
  }
}
<ul>
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

<ul style="--n:6;--d:45deg">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>
<ul style="--n:8;--d:-70deg">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>
<ul style="--n:8;--d:30deg">
  <li>test</li><li>test</li>
</ul>

  • Not sure if it is Chrome but the animation still shows a line/break with a slight off-set when it repeats randomly and stutters a bit at times. More so on the bigger version. the smaller one seem smoother but also shows the same just not as often as the bigger one. Maybe just my browser. – Nope Feb 27 at 16:06
  • 1
    @Nope not sure, I am also testing on Chrome and firefox (both seems fine). – Temani Afif Feb 27 at 16:11
  • Tryed to find a different solution to the quest, but this answer is really good. – Persijn Mar 1 at 12:20
  • @Persijn thanks, I had anoher solution using skew transformation on pseudo element which will make the calculation easier, I will probably add it later, not sure – Temani Afif Mar 1 at 12:37
  • @TemaniAfif was thinking of making a svg solution to it, but i think the path animation will become complex and difficult to make. – Persijn Mar 1 at 13:06

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