3

I have to do a project on a game of rock, paper, and scissors, and the code I have so far is a complete code for the game, but my professor does not like it since it is too redundant. Is there anyway to shorten it or make it more simple?

import random

while True:
bot = random.choice(["Rock", "Paper", "Scissors"]).lower()

user_choice = input("Choose between Rock, Paper, and Scissors or -1 to exit: \n ").lower()
if user_choice == bot:
   print("We tied! I chose", bot," and you chose", user_choice)
elif user_choice == "rock":
   if bot == "paper":
      print("You lose! I chose", bot," and you chose", user_choice , ", Paper beats rock!")
   elif bot == "scissors":
      print("You win! I chose", bot," and you chose", user_choice , ", Rock beat scissors!")
elif user_choice == "paper":
   if bot == "rock":
      print("You win! I chose",bot," and you chose", user_choice , ", Paper beats rock!")
   elif bot == "scissors:":
      print("You lose! I chose", bot," and you chose", user_choice , ", Scissors beats paper")
elif user_choice == "scissors":
   if bot == "paper":
      print("You win! I chose", bot," and you chose",user_choice, ", Scissors beats paper")
   elif bot == "rock":
      print("You Lose! I chose", bot," and you chose", user_choice , ", Rock beats scissors")
else:
print("Invalid Entry, you typed:", user_choice, ", Please try again: ")

if user_choice == '-1':
print("You selected -1 to exit, Goodbye!")
exit()

also sometimes when I enter paper as my input, I don't get an output, the code just loops back to the beginning, does anyone know why this happens?

Example: Choose between Rock, Paper, and Scissors or -1 to exit:

rock

You win! I chose scissors and you chose rock , Rock beat scissors!

Choose between Rock, Paper, and Scissors or -1 to exit:

paper

We tied! I chose paper and you chose paper

Choose between Rock, Paper, and Scissors or -1 to exit:

paper

Choose between Rock, Paper, and Scissors or -1 to exit: ^no output

scissors

You Lose! I chose rock and you chose scissors , Rock beats scissors

Choose between Rock, Paper, and Scissors or -1 to exit:

paper

Choose between Rock, Paper, and Scissors or -1 to exit:

^ theres no output

  • 4
    A question better suited over at Code Review. We're generally not tutoring here, and we usually help solve issues with code that isn't running as intended. And seeing as this code runs as intended, just not in a way that would please a professor. It's probably better off on CodeReview :) – Torxed Feb 27 at 20:48
  • 1
    However, before you post on codereview, please fix your indentation so it's a fully workable piece of code as is. – Jon Clements Feb 27 at 20:50
  • 1
    Since there seems to be a bug, it's not quite suitable for Code Review as is. – JETM Feb 27 at 20:50
  • 1
    You wrote "scissors:": instead of "scissors": – JETM Feb 27 at 20:59
  • Do you know what's expected of you at your level expertise to make it less redundant ? – Jon Clements Feb 27 at 21:08
1

I'd suggest to use the modulus operator and enumerate your choices. (rock(0)=> papers(1) => scissors (2))

The winning condition is user_choice - bot choice %3 == 1.

1

How can I make my code for a game of Rock, Paper, and scissors less redundant?

Firstly we can enumerate only the choices where the user wins or draws and let the cases where the user loses be implicit. e.g.

if user_choice == bot:
    result = "draw"
elif (user_choice == "rock") and (bot == "scissors"):
    result = "win";
elif (user_choice == "paper") and (bot == "rock"):
    result = "win";
elif (user_choice == "scissors") and (bot == "paper"):
    result = "win";
else:
    result = "lose";

Secondly since all the of the messages are forumulaic based-on substituting in the choices we can move the message generation seperate from the logic. I haven't written code for that because I'm not doing all your work for you.

Thirdly we could use a dictionary to represent the win-conditions for a given user-choice. Something like.

if user_choice == bot:
    result = "draw"
elif wincondition[user_choice] == bot:
    result = "win";
else:
    result = "lose";

also sometimes when I enter paper as my input, I don't get an output, the code just loops back to the beginning, does anyone know why this happens?

You have a stray colon in your code elif bot == "scissors:":

  • yup... the code can be massively reduced by something as simple as a wincondition lookup: WIN_CASES = {'rock': 'scissors', 'paper': 'rock', 'scissors': 'paper'}... it depends if the student has learnt about dictionaries or such like... I have a feeling it's not really what the teacher is expecting until we learn more. Then the entire thing comes down to about 5/6 lines of code. – Jon Clements Feb 27 at 21:20
0

One way it can be less redundant is instead of having all the if else statements, create a function that spits out the response to who won instead of typing it out each scenario for each combination.

0

You could parameterize the printed text:

player_wins = "You win! I chose {bot_choice} and you chose {player_choice}. {player_choice} beats {bot_choice}!"
player_looses = "You lose! I chose {bot_choice} and you chose {player_choice}. {bot_choice} beats {player_choice}!"

print(player_wins.format(bot_choice="Paper", player_choice="scissors")

You can also shorte the if-else clause. I'm just going to give you a hint, but if you look at the choices "rock" "paper" "scissors" as 0, 1 and 2, and sum the choices of the bot and the player, you will notice a pattern. The modulo operator plays a role.

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