1
template<typename T>
struct S {
    using type = T;
};

volatile S<int> s;

template<typename T>
void f(T& v) {
    using n = typename T::type;

    S<n>::_; // to show

}

int main() {
     f(s);
}

In f the T is deduced to volatile S<int>, but n is only int. What do I have to do to preserve the volatile, that is, to have n be volatile int?

  • how do you know it isnt? – formerlyknownas_463035818 Feb 28 at 9:57
  • 1
    The volatile qualifier is only for s, not for S<int>::type. – Some programmer dude Feb 28 at 9:58
  • 1
    @user463035818 Yes T for the f function is volatile S<int>. But T in S is int. – Some programmer dude Feb 28 at 10:04
  • 1
    @Someprogrammerdude ah right, I was a bit confused, type is not a member variable but just a typedef – formerlyknownas_463035818 Feb 28 at 10:05
  • 1
    volatile S<int> s; makes little sense (S<T> is a traits). Moreover, volatile is very rarely what you want. – Jarod42 Feb 28 at 10:10
6
using n = typename std::conditional< std::is_volatile<T>::value, 
            volatile typename T::type,
            typename T::type >::type;

Adds volatile to n if T is volatile.

3

For funsies. If you need to do this sort of thing often, it's possible to encapsulate it in a meta-function. Here's a possible implementation in :

#include <type_traits>

template<class Trait, typename=void>
struct propogate_cv_to_type{};

template<class Trait>
struct propogate_cv_to_type<Trait, std::void_t<typename Trait::type>>
{ using type = typename Trait::type; }; 

template<class Trait>
struct propogate_cv_to_type<Trait const, std::void_t<typename Trait::type>>
{ using type = typename Trait::type const; }; 

template<class Trait>
struct propogate_cv_to_type<Trait volatile, std::void_t<typename Trait::type>>
{ using type = typename Trait::type volatile; }; 

template<class Trait>
struct propogate_cv_to_type<Trait const volatile, std::void_t<typename Trait::type>>
{ using type = typename Trait::type const volatile; }; 

It's SFINAE friendly, so if the type being passed doesn't have a ::type member, it will not either. Otherwise, it exposes the same type by forwarding qualifiers onto it.

Here it is when applied to your example.

  • Can also be done for references too. – Jarod42 Mar 1 at 10:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.