2

Say I have a numpy array a = np.array([1, 5, 3, 2, 4, 6, 7]). Now I have another numpy array b = np.array([-1, -2, 3, 2, -1, -3]). The length of b is smaller than or equal to a. I wanna find the index i of the smallest element in a such that b[i] > 0. So in the example above, the result will be 3 since according to b only indices 2, 3 are valid and a[2] == 3 and a[3] == 2, so index 3 is chosen.

My current solution is

    smallest = np.inf
    index = None
    for i in range(len(b)):
        if b[i] > 0:
            if(a[i] < smallest):
                smallest = a[i]
                index = i

I am not sure if I can use numpy to do it more efficiently. Any advice is appreciated. Thank you.

1

Here's one vectorized way -

In [72]: idx = np.flatnonzero(b>0)

In [73]: idx[a[:len(b)][idx].argmin()]
Out[73]: 3
  • What's the purpose of that [:len(b)]? – Paul Panzer Feb 28 at 20:18
  • @PaulPanzer Was because a could be bigger than b, but then with idx being decided by b, I figured later, idx can't have indices larger than len(b), so isn't really needed for that specific case. – Divakar Feb 28 at 20:20
  • Ah, ok, I thought maybe it's some clever optimization I don't understand... – Paul Panzer Feb 28 at 20:23
0

You can use the intermediate results of indices from b to get the right index later, heres a way.

import numpy as np
a = np.array([1, 5, 3, 2, 4, 6, 7])
b = np.array([-1, -2, 3, 2, -1, -3])

indices_to_check = np.where(b > 0)[0]
result = indices_to_check[np.argmin(a[indices_to_check])]
#Output:
3
0

one liner:

idx = np.argwhere(a==a[:len(b)][b>0].min())[0]

Understandable code:

shortened_a = a[:len(b)]
filtered_a = shortened_a[b>0]
smallest = filtered_a.min()
indices_of_smallest = np.argwhere(a==smallest)
first_idx = indices_of_smallest[0]
  • It is code efficient. To figure out if it is computationaly efficient, you should always profile. But generally speaking, python for loops with dynamic type detection don't beat numpy C code with typed data. – PiRK Feb 28 at 20:04

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