2

Suppose I have a numpy array

a = numpy.array( [-1, -2, 3, 3, -4, -4, 9, 9, 10, -1, -3] ).

I would like to break the array into subarrays according to the rule: the first subarray starts with a[0] and ends before it changes sign. We continue the process at where the last operation ends.

For example, the array in the example would be broken into subarrays:

a1 = numpy.array( [-1, -2] )
a2 = numpy.array( [3, 3] )
a3 = numpy.array( [-4, -4] )
a4 = numpy.array( [9, 9, 10] )
a5 = numpy.array( [-1, -3] )

I thought about using masks with did not work out a good implementation.

  • There is no elegant way to do this because you end up with a variable number of variable names. Not only does this not fit well with numpy but it's an anti-pattern in Python in general – roganjosh Feb 28 at 20:40
3

Here's one compact way to produce list of those subarrays as output -

In [170]: a
Out[170]: array([-1, -2,  3,  3, -4, -4,  9,  9, 10, -1, -3])

In [171]: np.split(a,np.flatnonzero(np.diff(a>0))+1)
Out[171]: 
[array([-1, -2]),
 array([3, 3]),
 array([-4, -4]),
 array([ 9,  9, 10]),
 array([-1, -3])]

Alternatively, a bit more efficiency could be introduced with masking -

In [172]: mask = a>0

In [173]: np.split(a,np.flatnonzero(mask[:-1] != mask[1:])+1)
Out[173]: 
[array([-1, -2]),
 array([3, 3]),
 array([-4, -4]),
 array([ 9,  9, 10]),
 array([-1, -3])]

If by different signs, you meant to group 0s separately, use np.sign into the mix -

In [272]: a
Out[272]: array([ 4,  0, -4,  3, -4, -4,  9,  9, 10, -1, -3])

In [273]: np.split(a,np.flatnonzero(np.diff(np.sign(a))!=0)+1)
Out[273]: 
[array([4]),
 array([0]),
 array([-4]),
 array([3]),
 array([-4, -4]),
 array([ 9,  9, 10]),
 array([-1, -3])]

Create labelled islands

Create labelled islands based on the groupings -

mask = a>0
label = (np.ediff1d(mask.astype(int),to_begin=mask[0])!=0).cumsum()-mask[0]

Sample run -

# input array starting with negative number
In [243]: a
Out[243]: array([-1, -2,  3,  3, -4, -4,  9,  9, 10, -1, -3])

In [244]: mask = a>0

In [246]: (np.ediff1d(mask.astype(int),to_begin=mask[0])!=0).cumsum()-mask[0]
Out[246]: array([0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4])

# input array starting with positive number
In [248]: a
Out[248]: array([ 1, -2,  3,  3, -4, -4,  9,  9, 10, -1, -3])

In [249]: mask = a>0

In [251]: (np.ediff1d(mask.astype(int),to_begin=mask[0])!=0).cumsum()-mask[0]
Out[251]: array([0, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5])
  • 2
    Nice, and a little mod to get the dict: my_dict = {'a{}'.format(i): item for i, item in enumerate(np.split(a,np.flatnonzero(np.diff(a>0))+1))} – roganjosh Feb 28 at 20:48
  • Wow. This is biblical elegent! – user1101010 Feb 28 at 20:49
  • Thanks so much. May I ask: if I don't want to store the splitted array but to put different mask id's so that I can index them whenever I want to use them, is there a good way to achieve this? – user1101010 Feb 28 at 20:59
  • 1
    @user1101010 Please check out the edited section at the end. – Divakar Feb 28 at 21:21
0

The following function splits a, returning a list of required sub-numpy.arrays

import numpy as np

def splitBySign(arr):
    arrSign = np.sign(arr)                              # array([-1, -1,  1,  1, -1, -1,  1,  1,  1, -1, -1])
    arrSignChange = arrSign[:-1] - arrSign[1:]          # array([ 0, -2,  0,  2,  0, -2,  0,  0,  2,  0])
    splitIndices = np.nonzero(arrSignChange)[0] + 1     # array([2, 4, 6, 9])
    startIndices = np.insert(splitIndices, 0, 0)        # array([0, 2, 4, 6, 9])
    endIndices = np.append(splitIndices, len(arr))      # array([ 2,  4,  6,  9, 11])
    subArrList = []
    for start, end in zip(startIndices, endIndices):
        subArr = arr[start:end]
        subArrList.append(subArr)

    return subArrList                                   # [array([-1, -2]), array([3, 3]), array([-4, -4]), array([ 9,  9, 10]), array([-1, -3])]

For better understanding, values of its local variables are provided as comments, for argument arr invoked with given a as follows

arr = np.array([-1, -2, 3, 3, -4, -4, 9, 9, 10, -1, -3])
subArrList = splitBySign(a)

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