2

so when i click on the <p> tag of the home class, i want it to change color to green but it doesn't work and idk why. the click registers fine (as the console.log("test") displays just fine) but the rest of the function to change the color won't work. here's my css, html and js code (the js code is contained in the HTML, so it's not an external file or anything):

function selectHome() {
  console.log("test");
  document.getElementsByClassName("home").style += "background-color:green;";
}
.greyRect {
  height: 150px;
  width: 1350px;
  background-color: #D3D3D3;
}

h1 {
  text-align: center;
}

h2 {
  text-align: center;
}

.home {
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 80px;
  height: 35px;
  line-height: 2;
  position: relative;
  left: 350;
  color: white;
}

.casinocraps {
  background-color: grey;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 120px;
  height: 35px;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 2;
  position: relative;
  left: 460;
  bottom: 50;
  color: white;
}

.tictactoe {
  background-color: grey;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 90px;
  height: 35px;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 2;
  position: relative;
  left: 600;
  bottom: 100;
  color: white;
}

.bingo {
  background-color: grey;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 80px;
  height: 35px;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 2;
  position: relative;
  left: 700;
  bottom: 150;
  color: white;
}

.concentration {
  background-color: grey;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 100px;
  height: 35px;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 2;
  position: relative;
  left: 800;
  bottom: 200;
  color: white;
}

footer {
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 4;
  position: relative;
  top: 125;
  right: 15;
  height: 70px;
  width: 1365px;
  background-color: #D3D3D3;
}

.border {
  height: 50px;
  width: 100px;
  border: 4px solid green;
  background-color: #555;
  position: relative;
  top: 20;
  left: 100;
}

.rectangle {
  height: 50px;
  width: 100px;
  background-color: #555;
  position: relative;
  top: 50;
  left: 100;
}
<header class="greyRect">
  <h1>Assignment 1</h1>

  <h2>Home Page</h2>
  <nav>
    <p class="home" onclick="selectHome()">
      Home
    </p>
    <p class="casinocraps">

      <b>Casino Craps</b>
    </p>
    <p class="tictactoe">

      <b>Tic-Tac-Toe</b>
    </p>
    <p class="bingo">

      <b>Bingo</b>
    </p>
    <p class="concentration">

      <b>Concentration</b>
    </p>
  </nav>
  <div class="border">
  </div>
  <footer>Footer</footer>

</header>

4
  • document.getElementsByClassName("home").style.backgroundColor = "green" Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 20:51
  • You can refer to this Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 20:52
  • document.getElementsByClassName("home") returns an array Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 20:54
  • If you would not use inline javascript, you could use the this value to make changes to only the clicked element.
    – James
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 20:56

3 Answers 3

24

Others have suggested .getElementsByClassName("home")[0], which is a terrible idea.

First, .getElementsByClassName() returns a node list of all the matching elements. If you are only interested in the first one, it makes no sense to find that one and then keep scanning for more matches and then discard all but the first one found, which is what this code does.

Second, .getElementsByClassName() returns a "live" node list. This means that every time you interact with the list, the entire DOM is searched again for matches, ensuring that you have the most up to date set in your list. This can be useful in applications where nodes are being added and removed dynamically, but those use cases aren't as common.

FYI: .getElementsByTagName(), .getElementsByName(), and node.childNodes also return live node lists.

All of these previously mentioned methods date back to the earliest days of the DOM API, when it was still the "wild west" days of web development. They are all over two decades old and have much better alternatives today (i.e. .querySelector(), .querySelectorAll(), .closest()).

When it's not necessary to keep an up to date list, .querySelectorAll() is the way to go. And frankly, even if you do need an updated node list, you're still better off with .querySelectorAll() and just run it again manually at the point where you need an updated list.

Here's a good page that discusses this and here's what it has to say:

How to Think About Live Object?

Live object is not intuitive. You can think of it as delayed evaluation or lazy evaluation. Method or property of live object is re-computed when their result is accessed.


But, in this case, we don't even want a node list, we just want a single node. The correct solution would be:

document.querySelector(".home");

.querySelector() scans the document for the first element that matches the supplied selector and, if found, returns a reference to that single node. Otherwise, it returns undefined.

16
  • 2
    Fantastic explanation. Absolutely should have suggested querySelector in my answer. Thanks for the correction. Commented Mar 2, 2019 at 3:48
  • OK, this clears up a comment I made earlier, but what has me confused is why cloning the live collection with Array.from() or [...document.getElementsByClassName("test")] is still slower than querySelectorAll(). I guess it has to add the live-collection supporting code and then immediately tear it down.
    – zero298
    Commented Jun 4, 2019 at 21:24
  • @zero298 Why would you think that adding the extra step of creating an Array from the elements found from a DOM query and placed in a node list would be faster than just performing the DOM query and creating a node list? Commented Jun 4, 2019 at 21:30
  • I was thinking the live-collection code might be less overhead than the need to look for every DOM element and check if it matches the query vs every element and just checking its class since querySelectorAll can search with more complex searches than just a class name compare.
    – zero298
    Commented Jun 4, 2019 at 21:33
  • 1
    The linked test is invalid as the static node list is created once with length zero then never updated, so accessing the length property returns the wrong value. Adding document.querySelectorAll('.test') to each loop makes it somewhat slower than getElementsByTagName. You assume implementation details in "the document must be scanned", you don't know that. The collection might have an index that is updated as modifications occur, potentially making it faster for large collections than querySelectorAll, which likely depends on an index of all nodes in the document.
    – RobG
    Commented May 13, 2020 at 22:28
1

.style is actually a js object with keys corresponding to css properties.

As Adarsh said

document.getElementsByClassName("home")[0].style.backgroundColor = "green"

Edit - Don't do this. As Scott Marcus explains, this is pretty bad. Definitely should use querySelector('.home') to get the element.

Generally, if a property has a hyphen like background-color, you convert it to camel case ie backroundColor

Check out MDN - HTMLElement.style

14
  • 2
    @AnuragSrivastava .getElementsByClassName() returns a "node list", not an Array. Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 21:00
  • 1
    @ScottMarcus A bit off the thread, but "a live node list ... hurts performance" ..? Any evidence of that somewhere? AFAIK querySelector(All) are slow by nature, since they're performing a string search, whereas gEBCN searches from the DOM ...
    – Teemu
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 21:13
  • 1
    @Teemu It's often worded that way to explain the results of having a live node list, but in actuality, they function differently. Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 21:32
  • 1
    @ScottMarcus Hmm ... based on your test, it looks like the live collections are useless, the same result would be achieved by simply calling a gEBXN every time you need a collection or a member of it.
    – Teemu
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 22:01
  • 1
    @Teemu I agree. But, if you understand the history of how the DOM API evolved, it makes sense. .querySelectorAll() didn't come along until many years after the "live" node list methods were in place. Those are antiquated now and shouldn't really be used, except for extreme use cases. This is why you'll find me calling out the use of this all over Stack Overflow. ;) Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 22:07
1

Do it like this:

JS:

function selectHome() {
  document.getElementsByClassName("home")[0].style.backgroundColor = "green";
}

HTML:

<p class="home" onclick="selectHome()">
  Home
</p>

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