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The following code does not compile (With clang 7.0, --std=c++17):

struct Foo {
    void foo() {}
};
struct Bar {
    void bar() {}
};
struct Both {
    void foo() {}
    void bar() {}
};

template <typename T, typename>
void DoStuff(T input) {
    input.foo();
}

template <typename T, typename...>
void DoStuff(T input) {
    input.bar();
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    DoStuff(Foo());
    return 0;
}

The error is:

<source>:19:11: error: no member named 'bar' in 'Foo'
    input.bar();
    ~~~~~ ^

<source>:23:5: note: in instantiation of function template specialization 'DoStuff<Foo>' requested here
    DoStuff(Foo());

However, if you change Foo() to Bar() (or Both()) it compiles just fine. In the Bar() case, this shows that SFINAE is taking effect; in the Both() case it shows that the typename... overload has lower precedence, so the other one is chosen when both apply.

But what I don't understand is why SFINAE applies to the Bar() case but not the Foo() case?

2

There is no SFINAE going on here. All calls to DoStuff are going to call

template <typename T, typename...>
void DoStuff(T input) {
    input.bar();
}

The reason for this is that

template <typename T, typename>
void DoStuff(T input) {
    input.foo();
}

requires two template parameters while

template <typename T, typename...>
void DoStuff(T input) {
    input.bar();
}

works for 1 or more template parameters (variadic packs are allowed to be empty). So when you call

DoStuff(Foo());
// or
DoStuff(Bar());
//or
DoStuff(Both());

you can only deduce a single template parameter and the only viable candidate is

template <typename T, typename...>
void DoStuff(T input) {
    input.bar();
}

If you had used

DoStuff<Foo, any_other_type>(Foo());

then you'd get an ambiguity error since it matches both templates.

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