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I have written a VB.NET class that has COM Interop enabled so it can be utilized in VBA - specifically, MS Access.

The class works fine in VB.NET. With Accees, I can add the reference to it, instantiate the main object and set and return some properties.

But Access does not recognize anything relating to the sub-classes underneath the main class. VB.NET has no problem exposing these classes, but not VBA.

Is this simply a limitation of COM Interop and/or VBA?

Is there a work-around?

  • I think that to be visible in COM the member must appear in the IComClassIInterface class. They are implemented in your ComClass1 – Mary Mar 3 at 0:15
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No you can’t get interop to generate the sub classes for you (to appear in VBA)

However, keep in mind that nested classes are really the same as non-nested. That sub class instance HAS to be initialized anyway. And there is nothing you can't do if the classes were to be separated. And you can well place many classes in one code module.

So this is purely a syntax preference you are looking for.

However, what you can do declare a pubic instance of any sub class in the main class (variables area as public).

Take this simple example.

Imports System.Runtime.InteropServices

<ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.AutoDual)>
Public Class Class1

   Private m_Company As String = ""

   Public Function MyHello()
       MsgBox("Hello world")
   End Function

   Public Property Company As String
       Get
           Return m_Company
       End Get
       Set(value As String)
           m_Company = value
       End Set
   End Property

   <ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.AutoDual)>
   Public Class Class2
       Private m_FirstValue As Integer = 2

       Public Property V1 As Integer
           Get
               Return m_FirstValue
           End Get
           Set(value As Integer)
               m_FirstValue = value
           End Set
       End Property

       Public Function MyTimes2() As Integer
           Return m_FirstValue * 2
       End Function

   End Class

End Class

NOTE above the nested class “class2” in above.

Ok, so check the make com assembly visible = True, and for testing check the “register for com interop”

Compile the above, set the reference in Access. (Note how you don’t have to build a custom interface either!!!).

Now, in VBA you get this in intel-sense.

enter image description here

NOTE carefully how the sub class Class2 does not appear.

If you really want the intel-sense and sub class to appear, then to the above vb.net class, simple add this;

Public Class Class1

   Private m_Company As String = ""

   Public SClass2 As New Class2  <--- add this line to expose as public
   Private m_Company As String = ""

.etc. etc. etc.

Now I put a “S” in from of the name – you unfortunately can’t use the same name as the nested class. (so either put something in front of the nested class, or something in front of the public instance of that class (that is what I did in above).

Now if we compile, then in VBA you get this:

enter image description here

Note the class2 DOES appear as a sub class

And if I hit a “dot” in VBA editor, then the sub class methods show like this:

enter image description here

So quite sure the above is the only way to get the sub-classes working with COM interop

  • I'm pretty sure this is exactly what I'm looking for! Two elements you have that I don't have and am not familiar with are: Imports System.Runtime.InteropServices and <ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.AutoDual)> I'm going to try this out now. – Peter Mar 3 at 0:51
  • The interop reference to my knowledge was always required if you going to expose the class as COM. The autoduel is used because I am lazy and do not want to build a custom interface. The beauty of above is that code above works as I posted it. I never grasped why people spend all that extra time to build a custom interface. It simply a waste of effort and time. I would only put in all the code stubs and waste that time if there was major parts of the class object that I could not hide from VBA or I did not want to show. Note that you do need/want to force the project to x86 if this is for x32. – Albert D. Kallal Mar 3 at 1:47
  • Most examples go on for pages and have whacks of interface code. As noted, you don't need any of that. Just use autoduel, and click on the make com assembly visible box (which is checked by default). Any public sub/function (shows as methods) will show up in intel-sense. And any variable declared as public - including the above example where I included the sub class will now work in VBA. (so you can save tons of get/sets by just using public vars. COM objects don't work without a Runtime.Interop reference. Note sure how in the past you made this work without a runtime.interop reference.. – Albert D. Kallal Mar 3 at 1:56
  • One more tip: If you expose JUST ONE by intention or accident of a data type not supported in COM, then all of the intel-sense blows out and will not be seen. So any var type or sub/function or get/set of a non legal data type should not be exposed - if you do then the COM object will not show anything in intel-sense from VBA. You can expose iList, string, interger (which is long in VBA) or arrays. But use caution in exposing non basic data types in that class or the COM object will not give the user intel-sense anymore. – Albert D. Kallal Mar 3 at 1:58
  • I created my class with the COM Template as described here: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/visual-basic/programming-guide/… Some of my properies are lists of other classes, such as: Public Property Companies() As List(Of Company). Will this cause me problems? – Peter Mar 3 at 2:32

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