9

I have a buffer that I use for UART, which is declared this way:

union   Eusart_Buff {
    uint8_t     b8[16];
    uint16_t    b9[16];
};

struct  Eusart_Msg {
    uint8_t             msg_posn;
    uint8_t             msg_len;
    union Eusart_Buff   buff;
};

struct  Eusart {
    struct Eusart_Msg   tx;
    struct Eusart_Msg   rx;
};

extern  volatile    struct Eusart   eusart;

And here is the function that fills the buffer (which will be sent using interrupts):

void    eusart_msg_transmit (uint8_t n, void *msg)
{

    if (!n)
        return;

    /*
     * The end of the previous transmission will reset
     * eusart.tx.msg_len (i.e. ISR is off)
     */
    while (eusart.tx.msg_len)
        ;

    if (data_9b) {
        memcpy((void *)eusart.tx.buff.b9, msg,
                sizeof(eusart.tx.buff.b9[0]) * n);
    } else {
        memcpy((void *)eusart.tx.buff.b8, msg,
                sizeof(eusart.tx.buff.b8[0]) * n);
    }
    eusart.tx.msg_len   = n;
    eusart.tx.msg_posn  = 0;

    reg_PIE1_TXIE_write(true);
}

At the moment of using memcpy(), I know no one else is going to use the buffer (atomic), because the while loop ensures that the last message has been sent, and therefore the interrupt is disabled.

Is it safe to cast away volatile this way so that I am able to use memcpy() or should I make a function maybe called memcpy_v() like these to be safe?:

void *memcpy_vin(void *dest, const volatile void *src, size_t n)
{
    const volatile char *src_c  = (const volatile char *)src;
    char *dest_c                = (char *)dest;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
        dest_c[i]   = src_c[i];

    return  dest;
}

volatile void *memcpy_vout(volatile void *dest, const void *src, size_t n)
{
    const char *src_c       = (const char *)src;
    volatile char *dest_c   = (volatile char *)dest;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
        dest_c[i]   = src_c[i];

    return  dest;
}

volatile void *memcpy_v(volatile void *dest, const volatile void *src, size_t n)
{
    const volatile char *src_c  = (const volatile char *)src;
    volatile char *dest_c       = (volatile char *)dest;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
        dest_c[i]   = src_c[i];

    return  dest;
}

Edit:

If I need those new functions, given that I know no one is going to modify the array at the same time, would it make sense to use restrict to (maybe) help the compiler optimize (if it can)? Possibly this way (correct me if I'm wrong):

volatile void *memcpy_v(restrict volatile void *dest,
                        const restrict volatile void *src,
                        size_t n)
{
    const restrict volatile char *src_c = src;
    restrict volatile char *dest_c      = dest;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++)
        dest_c[i]   = src_c[i];

    return  dest;
}

Edit 2 (add context):

void    eusart_end_transmission (void)
{

    reg_PIE1_TXIE_write(false); /* TXIE is TX interrupt enable */
    eusart.tx.msg_len   = 0;
    eusart.tx.msg_posn  = 0;
}

void    eusart_tx_send_next_c   (void)
{
    uint16_t    tmp;

    if (data_9b) {
        tmp     = eusart.tx.buff.b9[eusart.tx.msg_posn++];
        reg_TXSTA_TX9D_write(tmp >> 8);
        TXREG   = tmp;
    } else {
        TXREG   = eusart.tx.buff.b8[eusart.tx.msg_posn++];
    }
}

void __interrupt()  isr(void)
{

    if (reg_PIR1_TXIF_read()) {
        if (eusart.tx.msg_posn >= eusart.tx.msg_len)
            eusart_end_transmission();
        else
            eusart_tx_send_next_c();
    }
}

Although volatile may not be is needed (I asked it in another question: volatile for variable that is only read in ISR?), this question still should be answered in the assumption that volatile is needed so that future users that really need volatile (for example me when I implement the RX buffer), can know what to do.


EDIT (Related) (Jul/19):

volatile vs memory barrier for interrupts

Basically says that volatile is not needed, and therefore this issue disappears.

  • Does your platform specify that volatile makes objects thread-safe? Because on most platform, that's not true. – David Schwartz Mar 3 at 1:01
  • It's thread-safe not because of volatile, but because there is only one thread, and also the interrupt is checked to be disabled before I start to write, and enabled after that. So 0 possibility of someone messing around at the same time. – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 at 1:21
  • 1
    What do you even need volatile for? – curiousguy Mar 3 at 2:26
  • 1
    Because the variable is used in normal code and also in an interrupt. It's just that in the moment of writing to it, I certify nobody else is using it, but in any other moment, the variable is shared across the main loop and the interrupt. – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 at 2:32
  • 1
    My understanding is that, strictly speaking, if you access a variable that has a volatile qualifier through a non-volatile pointer, you invoke undefined behaviour. Therefore, your use of 'plain' memcpy() is dubious, even if unlikely to actually cause trouble. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 3 at 2:49
4

Is memcpy((void *)dest, src, n) with a volatile array safe?

No. In the general case, memcpy() is not specified to work correctly with volatile memory.
OP's case looks OK to cast away volatile, yet posted code is insufficient to be certain.

If code wants to memcpy() volatile memory, write the helper function.

OP's code has restrict in the wrong place. Suggest

volatile void *memcpy_v(volatile void *restrict dest,
            const volatile void *restrict src, size_t n) {
    const volatile unsigned char *src_c = src;
    volatile unsigned char *dest_c      = dest;

    while (n > 0) {
        n--;
        dest_c[n] = src_c[n];
    }
    return  dest;
}

A singular reason for writing your own memcpy_v() is the a compiler can "understand"/analyze memcpy() and emit code that is very different than expected - even optimize it out, if the compiler thinks the copy is not needed. Remind oneself that the compiler thinks memcpy() manipulated memory is non-volatile.


Yet OP is using volatile struct Eusart eusart; incorrectly. Access to eusart needs protection that volatile does not provide.

In OP's case, code can drop volatile on the buffers and then use memcpy() just fine.

A remaining issue is in the scant code of how OP is using eusart. Using volatile does not solve OP's problem there. OP's does assert "I write to it atomically,", yet without posted atomic code, that is not certain.


Code like the below benefits with eusart.tx.msg_len being volatile, yet that is not sufficient. volatile insures .tx.msg_len is not cached and instead re-reads each time.

while (eusart.tx.msg_len)
    ;

Yet the read of .tx.msg_len is not specified as atomic. When .tx.msg_len == 256 and a ISR fires, decrementing .tx.msg_len, the read of the the LSbyte (0 from 256) and MSbyte (0 from 255), the non-ISR code may see .tx.msg_len as 0, not 255 nor 256, thus ending the loop at the wrong time. The access of .tx.msg_len needs to be specified as indivisible (atomic), else, once in a while code fails mysteriously.

while (eusart.tx.msg_len); also suffers from being an end-less loop. Should the transmission stop for some reason other than empty, the while loop never exits.

Recommend instead to block interrupts while inspecting or changing eusart.tx.msg_len, eusart.tx.msg_posn. Review your compilers support of atomic or

size_t tx_msg_len(void) {
  // pseudo-code
  interrupt_enable_state = get_state();
  disable_interrupts();
  size_t len = eusart.tx.msg_len;
  restore_state(interrupt_enable_state);
  return len;
}

General communication code ideas:

  1. While non-ISR code reads or writes eusart, make sure the ISR cannot ever change eusart.

  2. Do not block ISR for long in step #1.

  3. Do not assume underlying ISR() will chain input/output successfully without a hiccup. Top level code should be prepared to re-start output if it gets stalled.

  • I'll add more code so that you have full context :) – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 at 9:05
  • Why don't you also put restrict in src_c & dest_c? It isn't needed there, right? – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 at 9:27
  • Also, why use a while, when the for is more explicit? Won't the compiler be able to optimize away the index and reverse the order if it saves one instruction? – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 at 9:30
  • unsigned is unnecessary: stackoverflow.com/a/54965630/6872717 – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 at 14:44
  • 1
    @CacahueteFrito Re restrict not needed as the compiler, by analyzing *memcpy_v() alone, can deduce the restrict inheritance. – chux Mar 3 at 16:31
0

The Standard lacks any means by which programmers can demand that operations that access a region of storage by means of an ordinary pointer are completed before a particular volatile pointer access is performed, and also lacks any means of ensuring that operations which access a region of storage by means of an ordinary pointer are not carried out until after some particular volatile pointer access is performed. Since the semantics of volatile operations are Implementation-Defined, the authors of the Standard may have expected that compiler writers would recognize when their customers might need such semantics, and specify their behavior in a fashion consistent with those needs. Unfortunately, that hasn't happened.

Achieving the semantics you require will either making use of a "popular extension", such as the -fms-volatile mode of clang, a compiler-specific intrinsic, or else replacing memcpy with something that's so horribly inefficient as to swamp any supposed advantage compilers could gain by not supporting such semantics.

  • I don't fully understand the first part. Are you saying basically that volatile is not atomic? As I understand volatile, it just means that the compiler isn't allowed to remove code that could seem unnecessary, right? – Cacahuete Frito Mar 4 at 23:25
  • Also, I've never used clang for something serious (always GCC); could you provide a link for info on that -fms-volatile? – Cacahuete Frito Mar 4 at 23:51
  • @CacahueteFrito: Some compilers such as the MSVC (Microsoft) compiler will refrain from reordering any operations across volatile operations, and from what I can tell Clang can be configured to behave likewise via the use of the indicated flag. The clang documentation I've seen is a bit vague as to exactly what is and isn't promised, alas. – supercat Mar 5 at 4:57
  • By the standard, volatile is guaranteed to follow the order you write it: <C11: 5.1.2.3 Program execution>. – Cacahuete Frito Mar 5 at 19:04
  • @CacahueteFrito: The Standard only requires that operations on volatile-qualified objects be ordered relative to other operations on volatile-qualified objects. There is no standard means of forcing ordering relative to non-qualified objects.. – supercat Mar 5 at 19:21

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