2

I was implementing a version of memcpy() to be able to use it with volatile. Is it safe to use char * or do I need unsigned char *?

volatile void *memcpy_v(volatile void *dest, const volatile void *src, size_t n)
{
    const volatile char *src_c  = (const volatile char *)src;
    volatile char *dest_c       = (volatile char *)dest;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        dest_c[i]   = src_c[i];
    }

    return  dest;
}

I think unsigned should be necessary to avoid overflow problems if the data in any cell of the buffer is > INT8_MAX, which I think might be UB.

  • Why would you think it would be UB? Do both allow access to all of the bits regardless of what number those those bits might represent based on a particular type? – Retired Ninja Mar 3 '19 at 0:00
  • Ok, so it is reinterpreting the data no matter what it was originally, right? The value is possibly undefined, but the overall result is that you return it intact, and don't use the value, so it is defined behaviour in the end, right? – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 '19 at 0:03
  • Undefined behaviour doesn't get "un-undefined"; that makes no sense. But I'm also not seeing where you perceive the UB here. Instead of just "I think might be UB" please expand to present clearly and in detail your problem. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 3 '19 at 0:21
  • You are reading a value which may perfectly be (uint8_t)200, and in the moment you dereference it as a (possibly signed) char *, the value magically transforms into negative something. I have never had the need to do any type punning, so I do not know what is allowed and what is not, but that seems at least weird, to me. – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 '19 at 0:32
  • 1
    You might be able to prove that plain char is safe, but just using unsigned char will save you all that effort. (If there were a problem, it might show up with -0 values/representations in an implementation where plain char is signed and doesn't use 2's-complement. I doubt that any such systems exist.) – Keith Thompson Mar 3 '19 at 5:13
3

In theory, your code might run on a machine which forbids one bit pattern in a signed char. It might use ones' complement or sign-magnitude representations of negative integers, in which one bit pattern would be interpreted as a 0 with a negative sign. Even on two's-complement architectures, the standard allows the implementation to restrict the range of negative integers so that INT_MIN == -INT_MAX, although I don't know of any actual machine which does that.

So, according to §6.2.6.2p2, there may be one signed character value which an implementation might treat as a trap representation:

Which of these [representations of negative integers] applies is implementation-defined, as is whether the value with sign bit 1 and all value bits zero (for the first two [sign-magnitude and two's complement]), or with sign bit and all value bits 1 (for ones' complement), is a trap representation or a normal value. In the case of sign and magnitude and ones’ complement, if this representation is a normal value it is called a negative zero.

(There cannot be any other trap values for character types, because §6.2.6.2 requires that signed char not have any padding bits, which is the only other way that a trap representation can be formed. For the same reason, no bit pattern is a trap representation for unsigned char.)

So, if this hypothetical machine has a C implementation in which char is signed, then it is possible that copying an arbitrary byte through a char will involve copying a trap representation.

For signed integer types other than char (if it happens to be signed) and signed char, reading a value which is a trap representation is undefined behaviour. But §6.2.6.1/5 allows reading and writing these values for character types only:

Certain object representations need not represent a value of the object type. If the stored value of an object has such a representation and is read by an lvalue expression that does not have character type, the behavior is undefined. If such a representation is produced by a side effect that modifies all or any part of the object by an lvalue expression that does not have character type, the behavior is undefined. Such a representation is called a trap representation. (Emphasis added)

(The third sentence is a bit clunky, but to simplify: storing a value into memory is a "side effect that modifies all of the object", so it's permitted as well.)

In short, thanks to that exception, you can use char in an implementation of memcpy without worrying about undefined behaviour.

However, the same is not true of strcpy. strcpy must check for the trailing NUL byte which terminates a string, which means it needs to compare the value it reads from memory with 0. And the comparison operators (indeed, all arithmetic operators) first perform integer promotion on their operands, which will convert the char to an int. Integer promotion of a trap representation is undefined behaviour, as far as I know, so on the hypothetical C implementation running on the hypothetical machine, you would need to use unsigned char in order to implement strcpy.

  • 1
    On a platform using non 2's complement, (yes they are relics these days), with char a = { negative 0 }; char b; with b = a, must b take on '-0' or can the pesky -0` become 0 as it is assigned to b?. If this is true, then although the discussion about trap-values is good and using char does avoid UB, it does not insure for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) { dest_c[i] = src_c[i]; } performs as desired: copy a binary image form here to there. – chux - Reinstate Monica Mar 3 '19 at 16:22
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    This lengthy language-lawyering explanation should convince the reader to not use char type to manipulate bytes. It takes a very savvy C expert to explain why it is safe to use char where unsigned char is an obvious solution for plain programmers. Keep code as simple as possible, use unsigned char. – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 3 '19 at 19:54
  • @chux: Has there ever been a conforming C99 or C11 implementation that did not use two's-complement representation for char? – supercat Mar 4 '19 at 22:39
  • 1
    @supercat, as far as I know, no. The often-mentioned Unisys ClearPath OS 2200 has a C compiler targeted at C90, and there doesn't seem to be any plan to support C99 or any more recent version. (Although the C90 compiler continues to be maintained.) There are ongoing discussions to remove representations other than two's complement from C2x (and C++2x), and no other examples have surfaced in committee discussions, according to the proposal authors. – rici Mar 5 '19 at 4:57
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    @rici: The Standard should recognize a category of two's-complement implementations where bytes are assembled into longer types in big-endian fashion without padding bits, a category of two's-complement implementation where they are assembled in little-endian fashion without padding bits, and an "anything goes" category which imposes no particular requirements on implementation. I don't see any reason to mention ones'-complement or sign-magnitude choices, but nor do I see any need to explicitly limit things to two's-complement. – supercat Mar 5 '19 at 5:08
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Is it safe to use char * or do I need unsigned char *?

Perhaps


"String handling" functions such as memcpy() have the specification:

For all functions in this subclause, each character shall be interpreted as if it had the type unsigned char (and therefore every possible object representation is valid and has a different value). C11dr §7.23.1 3

Using unsigned char is the specified "as if" type. Little to be gained attempting others - which may or may not work.


Using char with memcpy() may work, but extending that paradigm to other like functions leads to problems.

A single big reason to avoid char for str...() and mem...() like functions is that sometimes it makes a functional difference unexpectedly.

memcmp(), strcmp() certainly differ with (signed) char vs. unsigned char.

Pedantic: On relic non-2's complement with signed char, only '\0' should end a string. Yet negative_zero == 0 too and a char with negative_zero should not indicate the end of a string.

1

You do not need unsigned.

Like so:

volatile void *memcpy_v(volatile void *dest, const volatile void *src, size_t n)
{
    const volatile char *src_c  = (const volatile char *)src;
    volatile char *dest_c       = (volatile char *)dest;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        dest_c[i]   = src_c[i];
    }

    return  dest;
}

Attemping to make a confirming implementation where char has a trap value will eventually lead to a contradiction:

  • fopen("", "rb") does not require use of only fread() and fwrite()
  • fgets() takes a char * as its first argument and can be used on binary files.
  • strlen() finds the distance to the next null from a given char *. Since fgets() is guaranteed to have written one, it will not read past the end of the array and therefore will not trap
  • 1
    What if char has a trap representation? – Eric Postpischil Mar 3 '19 at 1:04
  • @EricPostpischil: In memory? It's not allowed to. I could dig out my K&R book but it's going to tell me no way. Only uninitialized locals and pointer types do that. – Joshua Mar 3 '19 at 1:11
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    Yes, char may have a trap representation. K&R is not relevant; we use ISO C now. The bit about uninitialized locals having potentially undefined behavior is a special rule not related to trap representations. – Eric Postpischil Mar 3 '19 at 1:22
  • The reasoning that because fread, fwrite, and fgets can be used with binary files, they must support the reading and writing of arbitrary data with char is incorrect. Per C 2018 7.21.2 3, “A binary stream is an ordered sequence of characters that can transparently record internal data. Data read in from a binary stream shall compare equal to the data that were earlier written out to that stream, under the same implementation.” C’s streams are only required to support writing the representations of data and reading it back into the same type with results that compare equal in the type. – Eric Postpischil Mar 3 '19 at 17:35
  • @EricPostpischil: Have there ever been any non-contrived C99 or C17 implementations where CHAR_MAX-CHAR_MIN is an even number? Are there likely to be? If not, why should anyone care whether ISO C would allow such a thing? – supercat Mar 4 '19 at 22:50
1

The unsigned is not needed, but there is no reason to use plain char for this function. Plain char should only be used for actual character strings. For other uses, the types unsigned char or uint8_t and int8_t are more precise as the signedness is explicitly specified.

If you want to simplify the function code, you can remove the casts:

volatile void *memcpy_v(volatile void *dest, const volatile void *src, size_t n) {
    const volatile unsigned char *src_c = src;
    volatile unsigned char *dest_c = dest;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        dest_c[i] = src_c[i];
    }
    return dest;
}
  • Agree for char and unsigned char. Is uint8_t as valid as unsigned char in this case? In any other case where no type-punning occurs, I always use uint8_t for bytes, but I don't know in this case. – Cacahuete Frito Mar 3 '19 at 19:55
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    uint8_t is not necessarily available: it is specified as having exactly 8 value bits and two's complement representation. On systems that have it, it must be the same type as unsigned char because unsigned char must have a size of 1 byte, which cannot be smaller than 8 bits. (One could argue that a purposely perverse system where char would have ones' complement representation could also have a separate uint8_t type with two's complement representation, but I leave this discussion to DS9K implementers). – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 3 '19 at 20:00
  • @AnttiHaapala: you are correct, I was referring to int8_t regarding the representation of negative numbers, which must be two's complement. – chqrlie for yellow blockquotes Mar 9 '19 at 17:40

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