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I was a long time user of Autofac that recently switched to Simple Injector for my DI container needs. When I used Autofac, I was able to do something I'm still not able to do with Simple Injector, maybe because I do not yet perfectly understand the API.

Let's say I have the service IEntityRepository of TEntity and TDbContext. It's implementation looks like that:

    public class EntityRepository<TEntity, TDbContext> : IEntityRepository<TEntity, TDbContext>
            where TDbContext : IEntityDbContext where TEntity : class
        {
            public EntityRepository(TDbContext dbContext)
            {
            }
        }

With Autofac, I was able to register the open generic implementation EntityRepository as the open generic interface IEntityRepository, so when I would inject say, IEntityRepository of Product and IProductsDbContext, the DI container would automatically guess that I inject through the constructor an instance of ProductsDbContext.

Is this possible with Simple Injector? I tries these, but it still fails:

container.Register(typeof(IEntityRepository<,>), typeof(EntityRepository<,>).Assembly);
container.Register(typeof(IEntityRepository<,>), typeof(EntityRepository<,>));

Thanks in advance for you help!

EDIT: So here's a full exemple with Autofac as requested by Steven. Create a new .NET Core Console Application. You'll need to install the NuGet Package Autofac.

Program.cs:

internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var builder = new ContainerBuilder();

            builder.RegisterType<ProductsDbContext>().AsImplementedInterfaces();
            builder.RegisterGeneric(typeof(EntityRepository<,>)).As(typeof(IEntityRepository<,>));

            var container = builder.Build();
            using (var scope = container.BeginLifetimeScope())
            {
                var productsRepository = scope.Resolve<IEntityRepository<Product, IProductsDbContext>>();
                Console.WriteLine($"Resolved IEntityRepository is of type: {productsRepository.GetType()}");
            }
        }
    }

ProductsDbContext.cs

public class ProductsDbContext : IProductsDbContext
    {
        public void Dispose()
        {
            // Demo, do nothing.
        }

        public int SaveChanges()
        {
            throw new System.NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

Product.cs

public class Product
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

EntityRepository.cs

public class EntityRepository<TEntity, TDbContext> : IEntityRepository<TEntity, TDbContext>
        where TDbContext : IEntityDbContext where TEntity : class
    {
        private readonly TDbContext _dbContext;

        public EntityRepository(TDbContext dbContext)
        {
            _dbContext = dbContext;
            Console.WriteLine($"Database context is of type {dbContext.GetType()}.");
        }

        public IQueryable<TEntity> Where(Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>> whereClause)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

IEntityDbContext.cs

public interface IEntityDbContext : IDisposable
    {
        int SaveChanges();
    }

IProductsDbContext.cs

public interface IProductsDbContext : IEntityDbContext
    {

    }

IEntityRepository.cs

public interface IEntityRepository<TEntity, TDbContext> where TDbContext : IEntityDbContext where TEntity : class
    {
        IQueryable<TEntity> Where(Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>> whereClause);
    }

The final console output should ressemble to:

Database context is of type GenericTypeDiTester.DbContexts.ProductsDbContext. Resolved IEntityRepository is of type: GenericTypeDiTester.Repositories.EntityRepository`2[GenericTypeDiTester.Models.Product,GenericTypeDiTester.Interfaces.DbContexts.IProductsDbContext]

You can download the full example there: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UkIYxLsY6YGwo5jOB5TyyncXc6yho8X5/view?usp=sharing

EDIT 2: The problem wasn't with the Simple Injector library at the end. It seems that mixing the usage of Microsoft.DependencyInjection and SimpleInjector isn't really a good thing. As suggested by Steven, you should exclusively use SI to register the majority of your services and in rare case, MS.DI (by example for using AddDbContext).

As for my part, I have in my project MediatR, a library that implements the Mediator pattern. This library offers a NuGet package with an extension method AddMediatR for the IServiceCollection of MS.DI, which is supposed to register all handlers properly, but it wasn't the case for me. So I ended up registering the module all by myself using SI.

At the end it everything worked perfectly. You really need to call these lines at the end of the registering process: EnableSimpleInjectorCrossWiring and UseSimpleInjectorAspNetRequestScoping. Nothing else must be registered using the IServiceCollection afterwards. That way, the cross wiring of both DI framework ends up to work beautifully.

  • I'm pretty sure that Autofac doesn't guess this and that your Autofac configuration has an extra mapping (from IProductsDbContext to ProductsDbContext) that is currently missing from your Simple Injector configuration. It might be useful to share an MCVE that shows a working example of your Autofac configuration. – Steven Mar 3 at 20:53
  • @Steven Yes sorry, of course, I need to register ProductsDbContext to the container, so it can be injected. I will provide a full MCVE in a moment and will edit my question afterwards. – David Mar 3 at 22:04
  • @Steven there is the "AsImplementedInterfaces" concept in Autofac I cannot "replicate" under SimpleInjector, but I guess it's simply because the registering process is really different. The full example though should allow you to understand what I want to do under SimpleInjector. Thanks in advance for your help! – David Mar 3 at 22:58
3

The way to register this in Simple Injector is:

container.Register(typeof(IEntityRepository<,>), typeof(EntityRepository<,>));
container.Register<IProductsDbContext, ProductsDbContext>();

There is no AsImplementedInterfaces equivalent in Simple Injector, although there are several ways to achieve rhe same. In the case that ProductsDbContext has multiple interfaces that need to be registered, the most obvious way is to register each interface explicitly:

container.Register<IProductsDbContext, ProductsDbContext>();
container.Register<IUsersDbContext, ProductsDbContext>();
container.Register<ICustomersDbContext, ProductsDbContext>();
  • Okay, well I might understand why this is not working on my side. Is it possible I exclusively need to use SimpleInjector instead of using both Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection and SimpleInjector? Throughout the registering process, I use SimpleInjector first for the "complex" registrations and then the library of Microsoft for the rest. My database context is registered with MS, because they have an handy method called RegisterDbContext<TService, TImplementation>() or something similar. – David Mar 4 at 13:42
  • It depends on your needs, but I typically advise to use Simple Injector for all your application components and use MS.DI for changing frameworj and third party stuff. There are exceptions though and DbContext might be one of them, as it can be closely integrated with the framework. This is especially the case when you start using pooled DbContexts. In that case you let Simple Injector cross-wire the registration from MS.DI. – Steven Mar 4 at 15:54
  • Ok, so does that means I have to call EnableSimpleInjectorCrossWiring and UseSimpleInjectorAspNetRequestScoping at the farthest possible way at the application startup? At this moment, I register my open generic IEntityRepository with SI first, then with MS DI I use RegisterDbContext after. Another thing that comes to my mind is the usage of AddMediatR extension provided by the library's team, which is called totally at the end of the registration process. Thanks again for the help, knowing that I will try something different and probably update my question afterwards to share my discoveries. – David Mar 4 at 16:04
  • Sounds about right, although, when it comes to MediatR, I would make tge registrations part of Simple Injector, due to the limiations of MS.DI and because those MediatR abstractions are actually part of your application components, not part of a framework. – Steven Mar 4 at 16:22
  • And since MediatR is not much more than a set of abstractions, consider defining those abstractions yourself instead of depending on MediatR. It also allows ypu to define the abstractions in a way that make most sense to you. For instance, you might not be interested in async abstractions. And you might actually find using decorators more convenient than using those pre and post handlers. I believe that pre and post design was chosen by Jimmy to make MediatR work with more DI Containers. As an application designer however, you should pick the design that works best for you and your application – Steven Mar 4 at 19:32

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