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Considering this trivial piece of code

DispatchQueue.global().async {
    print("2")
}

print("1")

we can say that output will be as following:

1
2

Are there any circumstances under which order of execution will be different (disregarding kind of used queue)? May they be forced to appear manually if any?

5
  • 2
    No we can't surely says the output will be 1 , 2. They are seperate threads and the output is not clear whether it's 1,2 or 2,1 Commented Mar 4, 2019 at 10:15
  • This is a race, and you have no assurances as to the order they will execute. “May they be forced to”? If order is important, then I might suggest you shouldn’t be dispatching them to separate or concurrent queues. Create your own serial queue and dispatch both of these tasks to that queue, in which case, they’ll run FIFO. There are other ways to ensure order of execution, but this is the easiest.
    – Rob
    Commented Mar 4, 2019 at 10:53
  • It feels like there is really another question lurking out there, something that made you ask this. If you give us a practical example of what are you really doing where those two print statements are, and we might be able to offer better counsel.
    – Rob
    Commented Mar 4, 2019 at 11:01
  • @Rob there is no practical use honestly; this is one of the common questions at tech interview; and for some reason interviewers expect conclusion that order of execution is constant here. So (as it was not aligned with my understanding) I decided to clarify. Commented Mar 4, 2019 at 11:09
  • Perhaps the interviewer was just saying, effectively, “most of the time 1 will appear before 2”, which is true.
    – Rob
    Commented Mar 4, 2019 at 17:32

2 Answers 2

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You said:

we can say that output will be as following ...

No, at best you can only say that the output will often/frequently be in that order, but is not guaranteed to be so.

The code snippet is dispatching code asynchronously to a global, concurrent queue, which will run it on a separate worker thread, and, in the absence of any synchronization, you have a classic race condition between the current thread and that worker thread. You have no guarantee of the sequence of these print statements, though, in practice, you will frequently see 1 before 2.

this is one of the common questions at tech interview; and for some reason interviewers expect conclusion that order of execution is constant here. So (as it was not aligned with my understanding) I decided to clarify.

Your understanding is correct, that the sequence of these two print statements is definitely not guaranteed.

Are there any circumstances under which order of execution will be different

A couple of thoughts:

  1. By adjusting queue priorities, for example, you can change the likelihood that 1 will appear before 2. But, again, not guaranteed.

  2. There are a variety of mechanisms to guarantee the order.

    • You can use a serial queue ... I gather you didn’t want to consider using another/different queue, but it is generally the right solution, so any discussion on this topic would be incomplete without that scenario;
    • You can use dispatch group ... you can notify on the global queue when the current queue satisfies the group;
    • You can use dispatch semaphores ... semaphores are a classic answer to the question, but IMHO semaphores should used sparingly as it’s so easy to make mistakes ... plus blocking threads is never a good idea;
    • For the sake of completeness, we should mention that you really can use any synchronization mechanism, such as locks.
1
  • Thank you. By circumstances I rather mean some processes under the hood, excluding synchronisation mechanisms. But now I'm a bit more confident Commented Mar 5, 2019 at 12:27
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I do a quick test too. Normally I will do a UI update after code execution on global queue is complete, and I would usually put in the end of code block step 2.

But today I suddenly found even I put that main queue code in the beginning of global queue block step 1, it still is executed after all global queue code execution is completed.

DispatchQueue.global().async {
    // step 1
    DispatchQueue.main.async {
        print("1. on the main thread")
    }
    
    // code global queue
    print("1. off the main thread")
    print("2. off the main thread")
    
    // step 2
    DispatchQueue.main.async {
        print("2. on the main thread")
    }
}

Here is the output:

1. off the main thread
2. off the main thread
1. on the main thread
2. on the main thread

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