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I wrote a script that I believe should produce the same results in Python and R, but they are producing very different answers. Each attempts to fit a model to simulated data by minimizing deviance using Nelder-Mead. Overall, optim in R is performing much better. Am I doing something wrong? Are the algorithms implemented in R and SciPy different?

Python result:

>>> res = minimize(choiceProbDev, sparams, (stim, dflt, dat, N), method='Nelder-Mead')

 final_simplex: (array([[-0.21483287, -1.        , -0.4645897 , -4.65108495],
       [-0.21483909, -1.        , -0.4645915 , -4.65114839],
       [-0.21485426, -1.        , -0.46457789, -4.65107337],
       [-0.21483727, -1.        , -0.46459331, -4.65115965],
       [-0.21484398, -1.        , -0.46457725, -4.65099805]]), array([107.46037865, 107.46037868, 107.4603787 , 107.46037875,
       107.46037875]))
           fun: 107.4603786452194
       message: 'Optimization terminated successfully.'
          nfev: 349
           nit: 197
        status: 0
       success: True
             x: array([-0.21483287, -1.        , -0.4645897 , -4.65108495])

R result:

> res <- optim(sparams, choiceProbDev, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, dat=dat, N=N,
             method="Nelder-Mead")

$par
[1] 0.2641022 1.0000000 0.2086496 3.6688737

$value
[1] 110.4249

$counts
function gradient 
     329       NA 

$convergence
[1] 0

$message
NULL

I've checked over my code and as far as I can tell this appears to be due to some difference between optim and minimize because the function I'm trying to minimize (i.e., choiceProbDev) operates the same in each (besides the output, I've also checked the equivalence of each step within the function). See for example:

Python choiceProbDev:

>>> choiceProbDev(np.array([0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 3]), stim, dflt, dat, N)
143.31438613033876

R choiceProbDev:

> choiceProbDev(c(0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 3), stim, dflt, dat, N)
[1] 143.3144

I've also tried to play around with the tolerance levels for each optimization function, but I'm not entirely sure how the tolerance arguments match up between the two. Either way, my fiddling so far hasn't brought the two into agreement. Here is the entire code for each.

Python:

# load modules
import math
import numpy as np
from scipy.optimize import minimize
from scipy.stats import binom

# initialize values
dflt = 0.5
N = 1

# set the known parameter values for generating data
b = 0.1
w1 = 0.75
w2 = 0.25
t = 7

theta = [b, w1, w2, t]

# generate stimuli
stim = np.array(np.meshgrid(np.arange(0, 1.1, 0.1),
                            np.arange(0, 1.1, 0.1))).T.reshape(-1,2)

# starting values
sparams = [-0.5, -0.5, -0.5, 4]


# generate probability of accepting proposal
def choiceProb(stim, dflt, theta):

    utilProp = theta[0] + theta[1]*stim[:,0] + theta[2]*stim[:,1]  # proposal utility
    utilDflt = theta[1]*dflt + theta[2]*dflt  # default utility
    choiceProb = 1/(1 + np.exp(-1*theta[3]*(utilProp - utilDflt)))  # probability of choosing proposal

    return choiceProb

# calculate deviance
def choiceProbDev(theta, stim, dflt, dat, N):

    # restrict b, w1, w2 weights to between -1 and 1
    if any([x > 1 or x < -1 for x in theta[:-1]]):
        return 10000

    # initialize
    nDat = dat.shape[0]
    dev = np.array([np.nan]*nDat)

    # for each trial, calculate deviance
    p = choiceProb(stim, dflt, theta)
    lk = binom.pmf(dat, N, p)

    for i in range(nDat):
        if math.isclose(lk[i], 0):
            dev[i] = 10000
        else:
            dev[i] = -2*np.log(lk[i])

    return np.sum(dev)


# simulate data
probs = choiceProb(stim, dflt, theta)

# randomly generated data based on the calculated probabilities
# dat = np.random.binomial(1, probs, probs.shape[0])
dat = np.array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1,
       0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1,
       0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1])

# fit model
res = minimize(choiceProbDev, sparams, (stim, dflt, dat, N), method='Nelder-Mead')

R:

library(tidyverse)

# initialize values
dflt <- 0.5
N <- 1

# set the known parameter values for generating data
b <- 0.1
w1 <- 0.75
w2 <- 0.25
t <- 7

theta <- c(b, w1, w2, t)

# generate stimuli
stim <- expand.grid(seq(0, 1, 0.1),
                    seq(0, 1, 0.1)) %>%
  dplyr::arrange(Var1, Var2)

# starting values
sparams <- c(-0.5, -0.5, -0.5, 4)

# generate probability of accepting proposal
choiceProb <- function(stim, dflt, theta){
  utilProp <- theta[1] + theta[2]*stim[,1] + theta[3]*stim[,2]  # proposal utility
  utilDflt <- theta[2]*dflt + theta[3]*dflt  # default utility
  choiceProb <- 1/(1 + exp(-1*theta[4]*(utilProp - utilDflt)))  # probability of choosing proposal
  return(choiceProb)
}

# calculate deviance
choiceProbDev <- function(theta, stim, dflt, dat, N){
  # restrict b, w1, w2 weights to between -1 and 1
  if (any(theta[1:3] > 1 | theta[1:3] < -1)){
    return(10000)
  }

  # initialize
  nDat <- length(dat)
  dev <- rep(NA, nDat)

  # for each trial, calculate deviance
  p <- choiceProb(stim, dflt, theta)
  lk <- dbinom(dat, N, p)

  for (i in 1:nDat){
    if (dplyr::near(lk[i], 0)){
      dev[i] <- 10000
    } else {
      dev[i] <- -2*log(lk[i])
    }
  }
  return(sum(dev))
}

# simulate data
probs <- choiceProb(stim, dflt, theta)

# same data as in python script
dat <- c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1,
         0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1,
         0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1,
         0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
         0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
         1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1)

# fit model
res <- optim(sparams, choiceProbDev, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, dat=dat, N=N,
             method="Nelder-Mead")

UPDATE:

After printing the estimates at each iteration, it now appears to me that the discrepancy might stem from differences in 'step sizes' that each algorithm takes. Scipy appears to take smaller steps than optim (and in a different initial direction). I haven't figured out how to adjust this.

Python:

>>> res = minimize(choiceProbDev, sparams, (stim, dflt, dat, N), method='Nelder-Mead')
[-0.5 -0.5 -0.5  4. ]
[-0.525 -0.5   -0.5    4.   ]
[-0.5   -0.525 -0.5    4.   ]
[-0.5   -0.5   -0.525  4.   ]
[-0.5 -0.5 -0.5  4.2]
[-0.5125 -0.5125 -0.5125  3.8   ]
...

R:

> res <- optim(sparams, choiceProbDev, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, dat=dat, N=N, method="Nelder-Mead")
[1] -0.5 -0.5 -0.5  4.0
[1] -0.1 -0.5 -0.5  4.0
[1] -0.5 -0.1 -0.5  4.0
[1] -0.5 -0.5 -0.1  4.0
[1] -0.5 -0.5 -0.5  4.4
[1] -0.3 -0.3 -0.3  3.6
...
  • This is a very involved use case and not a simple optim. I advise printing out each step of the data manipulation process and check if each data piece matches in both scripts. Any one of these steps could be the issue. One check: binom.pmf and dbinom. – Parfait Mar 4 '19 at 17:08
  • @Parfait -- Thanks! I've edited my question to hopefully help to highlight and pinpoint the issue. I've edited my code to more clearly specify which library is being used. I've gone through both codes line-by-line and everything appears to be equivalent (e.g., the choiceProbDev function that I'm minimizing produces identical results in both implementations). – YTD Mar 4 '19 at 17:32
  • 1
    Try playing around with args in R's optim control list to match with defaults in Python's minimize(method='Nelder-Mead'). I am thinking it is due to default differences. – Parfait Mar 4 '19 at 19:16
  • Method Nelder-Mead in optim is not the best or most accurate implementation of Nelder-Mead available in R. You might like to try out nmk[b] in package dfoptim or neldermead[b] in adagio or an adaptive version anms in pracma, among others. The implementations are not so much different, but can lead to significant differences in accuracy and efficiency, especially if there is more than one minimum. – Hans W. Mar 6 '19 at 11:02
1

'Nelder-Mead' has always been a problematic optimization method, and its coding in optim is not up-to-date. We will try three other implementations available in R packages.

To avoild the other parameters, let's define function fn as

fn <- function(theta)
        choiceProbDev(theta, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, dat=dat, N=N)

Then the solvers dfoptim::nmk(), adagio::neldermead(), and pracma::anms() will all return the same minimum value xmin = 105.7843, but at different positions, for instance

dfoptim::nmk(sparams, fn)
## $par
## [1] 0.1274937 0.6671353 0.1919542 8.1731618
## $value
## [1] 105.7843

These are real local minima while, for example, the Python solution 107.46038 at c(-0.21483287,-1.0,-0.4645897,-4.65108495) is not. Your problem data are obviously not sufficient for fitting the model.

You might try a global optimizer to possibly find a global optimum within certain bounds. To me it looks like all local minima have the same minimum value.

  • Thank you for the suggestion of a global optimizer. Thanks also for the helpful suggestions of other R packages that might work better. If optim is so out of date though then it's interesting that it performs so much better than scipy.optimize in this case. Is scipy even more outdated? I guess my question still stands: Why is scipy's result so different and so much poorer than all the R optimizers listed here? I'd like to understand the reason for the difference and if there is a way to improve its performance / bring it into closer agreement with R. – YTD Mar 6 '19 at 17:45
  • Also, is there another python module that performs Nelder-Mead better? Any time I search for optimization functions in python, it seems an overwhelming proportion of the results lead to scipy.optimize. Surely python has a comparable algorithm that can at least come close to R's. – YTD Mar 6 '19 at 17:49
  • Why do you think optim performs so much better than scipy.minimize? optim returns 110.4249 as minimum, minimize 107.4604, at least with default options. Both are not true local minima. The SciPy source code only mentions the original article of Nelder and Mead, and an overview article from 1996. It would not be too difficult to convert the adaptive Nelder-Mead procedure (which is about 20 LoC) from R (resp. its Matlab version) to Python. – Hans W. Mar 6 '19 at 19:21
  • Take a look at the PyPi project nelder-mead, latest version from Oct. 2018, this may be an attempt to provide a new implementation for the Python community. With Python3 it can be installed with pip install nelder-mead. (Disclaimer: I haven't tried it.) – Hans W. Mar 6 '19 at 19:34
  • Ah you're right... I've been so focused on the fact that optim has been consistently returning parameter values that are significantly closer to the original inputs that I've lost sight of the fact that the minimum from scipy.optimize is actually lower. Oops. Thanks for the PyPi tip. – YTD Mar 6 '19 at 20:08
2

This isn't exactly an answer of "what are the optimizer differences", but I want to contribute some exploration of the optimization problem here. A few take-home points:

  • the surface is smooth, so derivative-based optimizers might work better (even without an explicitly coded gradient function, i.e. falling back on finite difference approximation - they'd be even better with a gradient function)
  • this surface is symmetric, so it has multiple optima (apparently two), but it's not highly multimodal or rough, so I don't think a stochastic global optimizer would be worth the trouble
  • for optimization problems that aren't too high-dimensional or expensive to compute, it's feasible to visualize the global surface to understand what's going on.
  • for optimization with bounds, it's generally better either to use an optimizer that explicitly handles bounds, or to change the scale of parameters to an unconstrained scale

Here's a picture of the whole surface:

enter image description here

The red contours are the contours of log-likelihood equal to (110, 115, 120) (the best fit I could get was LL=105.7). The best points are in the second column, third row (achieved by L-BFGS-B) and fifth column, fourth row (true parameter values). (I haven't inspected the objective function to see where the symmetries come from, but I think it would probably be clear.) Python's Nelder-Mead and R's Nelder-Mead do approximately equally badly.


parameters and problem setup

## initialize values
dflt <- 0.5; N <- 1
# set the known parameter values for generating data
b <- 0.1; w1 <- 0.75; w2 <- 0.25; t <- 7
theta <- c(b, w1, w2, t)
# generate stimuli
stim <- expand.grid(seq(0, 1, 0.1), seq(0, 1, 0.1))
# starting values
sparams <- c(-0.5, -0.5, -0.5, 4)
# same data as in python script
dat <- c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1,
         0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1,
         0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1,
         0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
         0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
         1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1)

objective functions

Note use of built-in functions (plogis(), dbinom(...,log=TRUE) where possible.

# generate probability of accepting proposal
choiceProb <- function(stim, dflt, theta){
    utilProp <- theta[1] + theta[2]*stim[,1] + theta[3]*stim[,2]  # proposal utility
    utilDflt <- theta[2]*dflt + theta[3]*dflt  # default utility
    choiceProb <- plogis(theta[4]*(utilProp - utilDflt))  # probability of choosing proposal
    return(choiceProb)
}
# calculate deviance
choiceProbDev <- function(theta, stim, dflt, dat, N){
  # restrict b, w1, w2 weights to between -1 and 1
    if (any(theta[1:3] > 1 | theta[1:3] < -1)){
        return(10000)
    }
    ## for each trial, calculate deviance
    p <-  choiceProb(stim, dflt, theta)
    lk <-  dbinom(dat, N, p, log=TRUE)
    return(sum(-2*lk))
}
# simulate data
probs <- choiceProb(stim, dflt, theta)

model fitting

# fit model
res <- optim(sparams, choiceProbDev, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, dat=dat, N=N,
             method="Nelder-Mead")
## try derivative-based, box-constrained optimizer
res3 <- optim(sparams, choiceProbDev, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, dat=dat, N=N,
              lower=c(-1,-1,-1,-Inf), upper=c(1,1,1,Inf),
             method="L-BFGS-B")

py_coefs <- c(-0.21483287,  -0.4645897 , -1, -4.65108495) ## transposed?
true_coefs <- c(0.1, 0.25, 0.75, 7)  ## transposed?
## start from python coeffs
res2 <- optim(py_coefs, choiceProbDev, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, dat=dat, N=N,
             method="Nelder-Mead")

explore log-likelihood surface

cc <- expand.grid(seq(-1,1,length.out=51),
                  seq(-1,1,length.out=6),
                  seq(-1,1,length.out=6),
                  seq(-8,8,length.out=51))
## utility function for combining parameter values
bfun <- function(x,grid_vars=c("Var2","Var3"),grid_rng=seq(-1,1,length.out=6),
                 type=NULL) {
    if (is.list(x)) {
        v <- c(x$par,x$value)
    } else if (length(x)==4) {
        v <- c(x,NA)
    }
    res <- as.data.frame(rbind(setNames(v,c(paste0("Var",1:4),"z"))))
    for (v in grid_vars)
        res[,v] <- grid_rng[which.min(abs(grid_rng-res[,v]))]
    if (!is.null(type)) res$type <- type
    res
}

resdat <- rbind(bfun(res3,type="R_LBFGSB"),
                bfun(res,type="R_NM"),
                bfun(py_coefs,type="Py_NM"),
                bfun(true_coefs,type="true"))

cc$z <- apply(cc,1,function(x) choiceProbDev(unlist(x), dat=dat, stim=stim, dflt=dflt, N=N))
library(ggplot2)
library(viridisLite)
ggplot(cc,aes(Var1,Var4,fill=z))+
    geom_tile()+
    facet_grid(Var2~Var3,labeller=label_both)+
    scale_fill_viridis_c()+
    scale_x_continuous(expand=c(0,0))+
    scale_y_continuous(expand=c(0,0))+
    theme(panel.spacing=grid::unit(0,"lines"))+
    geom_contour(aes(z=z),colour="red",breaks=seq(105,120,by=5),alpha=0.5)+
    geom_point(data=resdat,aes(colour=type,shape=type))+
    scale_colour_brewer(palette="Set1")

ggsave("liksurf.png",width=8,height=8)

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