0
 case when vh.km<=7500 then 5000
            when vh.km>7500 and vh.km<=12500 then 10000
            when vh.km>12500 and vh.km<=17500 then 15000
            when vh.km>17500 and vh.km<=22500 then 20000
            when vh.km>22500 and vh.km<=27500 then 25000
            when vh.km>27500 and vh.km<=32500 then 30000
            when vh.km>32500 and vh.km<=37500 then 35000
            when vh.km>37500 and vh.km<=42500 then 40000
            when vh.km>42500 and vh.km<=47500 then 45000
            .................

As you can see this increases by 5000 and the cycle is very long, then I would like to know if it can be simplified, I hope you can help me thanks

0
8

You could use a simple math operation, only if vh.km is an integer.

SELECT (((vh.km-2501)/5000) + 1)*5000

This seems to follow your pattern as indicated with the following test, unless you failed to mention something.

WITH 
E(n) AS(
    SELECT n FROM (VALUES(0),(0),(0),(0),(0),(0),(0),(0),(0),(0))E(n)
),
E2(n) AS(
    SELECT a.n FROM E a, E b
),
E4(n) AS(
    SELECT a.n FROM E2 a, E2 b
),
cteTally(km) AS(
    SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) * 100 n
    FROM E4
)
SELECT km,
        case when vh.km<=7500 then 5000
            when vh.km>7500  and vh.km<=12500 then 10000
            when vh.km>12500 and vh.km<=17500 then 15000
            when vh.km>17500 and vh.km<=22500 then 20000
            when vh.km>22500 and vh.km<=27500 then 25000
            when vh.km>27500 and vh.km<=32500 then 30000
            when vh.km>32500 and vh.km<=37500 then 35000
            when vh.km>37500 and vh.km<=42500 then 40000
            when vh.km>42500 and vh.km<=47500 then 45000
        END,
    (((vh.km-2501)/5000) + 1)*5000
FROM cteTally vh
2
  • Darn you to heck, Luis, for typing faster than me! :) – Brian Mar 4 '19 at 22:21
  • 1
    You could also skip all the > predicates as they are redundant. :) – Sean Lange Mar 4 '19 at 22:31
0

Something like this would also work, and only requires a single simple CASE expression for the 0 case. This also lets you drive the upper bound/cycle with a simple variable instead of having to define all the ranges. In fact it's only even this complex because all of your ranges / results are uniform except for the very first one.

DECLARE @numCycles tinyint = 10;

;WITH x AS
(
  SELECT n = 1 UNION ALL SELECT n+1 FROM x WHERE n < @numCycles
), y AS 
(
  SELECT s = 7500 + ((n-2)*5000)-CASE n WHEN 1 THEN 2501 ELSE 0 END, 
         e = 7500 + ((n-1)*5000), 
         r = n*5000
  FROM x
)
SELECT vh.km, y.r  /* , vh.<othercols> */
FROM y INNER JOIN dbo.table_name AS vh
  ON vh.km > y.s AND vh.km <= y.e;

If you have more than 100 cycles, you'll need to add OPTION (MAXRECURSION n):

-- if @numCycles > 100 and < 32768:
-- OPTION (MAXRECURSION <numCycles>);

-- if @numCycles >= 32768
-- OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0);

If you have more than 255 cycles, you'll need to change the tinyint but otherwise it will all still work the same.

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