2

In C#, is there a one-line implementation of the following simple piece of logic ?

if (a != null) 
{
    b = a ;
}
else
{
    // do something else;
}

Notice that in the else I do not want to assign a different value to the variable b.

14
  • 8
    You can do: if (a != null) b = a; all in one line
    – JayV
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:46
  • 2
    ternary operator
    – JanT
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:46
  • 1
    If you need the else block, which doesn't assign to b, then no.
    – canton7
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:48
  • 2
    lines-- sometimes means readability--, what's wrong with multiple lines?
    – vc 74
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:48
  • 2
    @L_Oste_Fa_No Define "efficient"
    – vc 74
    Mar 5, 2019 at 15:10

6 Answers 6

10

If you want to do an if / else in a single line, you must know the structure that the code must have:

condition ? consequent : alternative

For example:

string A = "test";
Console.WriteLine(String.IsNullOrEmpty(A) ? "Yes" : "No");
//Result = No

string B = "";
Console.WriteLine(String.IsNullOrEmpty(B) ? "Yes" : "No");
//Result = Yes
8

Maybe you were looking for braceless notation?

if (a != null) b = a; else /*Do something else*/ ;

Please, use this sparingly and make sure the oneliner will be readable.

5
  • Well ok :-), but can one avoid repeating the a ?
    – user6330630
    Mar 5, 2019 at 15:10
  • You could easily create a method like bool SetIfNotNull(object a, object b) then call it if(!SetIfNotNull(a,b)) /* Do Something else */
    – Rafalon
    Mar 5, 2019 at 15:16
  • @L_Oste_Fa_No, that seems like an interesting puzzle, but I don't think there's any good practical reason in doing so. Definetely would love to see an elegant solution though.
    – Seva
    Mar 5, 2019 at 15:27
  • @Seva why sparingly? Is there an issue with this notation?
    – physics90
    May 5 at 19:53
  • I'd say it tends to make the conditional block less readable, especially if the predicate is longer, or an expression in an if or else branch is longer (character-wise). If we take some silly example like: if (oldUserName != newUserName) user.Name = newUserName; else Console.WriteLine("Not updating user name.");. I find I need slightly more time to comprehend this line, rather than having an if, the if block, else and else block all on separate lines. Just a question of good formatting for me and tends to eliminate "surprises" because you missed something in a long line.
    – Seva
    May 6 at 7:56
7

Easiest way is probably to do this:

b = a != null ? a : b;

Syntax for this is:

someValue = condition ? newValue : someOtherValue;

If you need it to something more specific when a is null then you can do this, but it's not pretty:

public static void Main()
{
    int? a = null;
    int b = 0;
    b = a != null ? a.Value : yeet(b);
    
    System.Console.WriteLine(b);
    
}

public static int yeet(int b){
    System.Console.WriteLine("yeet");
    return b;
}
4

Not sure why one would want to do this, but here is my take:

((a != null) ? (Action)(() => { b = a; }) : () => { /*Do something else*/ })();
1
  • @PeterB: Yes it does. Try it. :-)
    – JuanR
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:59
1

I wouldn't really know why, but yes you can:

if (a != null) { b = a; } else { Console.WriteLine("Welcome to the 'else' branch"); }
6
  • 2
    @GiladGreen Why not?
    – Rafalon
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:51
  • 8
    @Rafalon because under this logic the entire C# program can be a one-liner :) Mar 5, 2019 at 14:52
  • 5
    I'm tempted to edit this answer and properly format it ;)
    – vc 74
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:53
  • @GiladGreen Yes, it does. If you want something other than not having new line characters, then you should ask for that, not to have the code without any new line characters.
    – Servy
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:53
  • 1
    @vc74 Me too :-)
    – Peter B
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:54
0
string asd = "asd";
string bsd = null;

asd = bsd != null ? bsd : new Func<string>(() => { Console.WriteLine("Do something"); return asd; })();

This won't change asd and it is "one-liner" but i would not recommend this over normal if else

0

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