1

I have a 3d numpy array with a shape of (100000, 256, 256), and I'd like to do FFT on every stack of the 2d array, which means 100000 times of FFT.

I have tested the speed of single and the stacked data with minimum code below.

import numpy as np
a = np.random.random((256, 256))
b = np.random.random((10, 256, 256))

%timeit np.fft.fft2(a)

%timeit np.fft.fftn(b, axes=(1, 2,))

Which gives the following:

872 µs ± 19.2 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

6.46 ms ± 227 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

100000 times of fft will take more than one minite.

Is there any faster way to do multiple fft or ifft at the same time?

Update: After a bit search, I found cupy, which seems can help.

  • 2
    Are you running into performance problems with your code? More than likely, there's other places that can be optimized. Numpy is already written in C and highly optimized. – jhpratt Mar 6 at 1:46
  • My job simply has to deal with a huge volume of 2d fft. Indeed, numpy fft is optmized, it is faster than many fft schemes. The only thing I can think about is parallel the process. Maybe pycuda is a option, but it takes a lot of effort. – ted930511 Mar 6 at 1:53
  • 1
    I mean, there's always the option of spinning up a thread pool? – jhpratt Mar 6 at 1:53
  • I only have experience in pyCUDA thread, not sure what do you mean by spinning up a thread pool. Sry. – ted930511 Mar 6 at 2:02
  • 1
    You're computing the FFT along the 10-dimension, not over the other two dimensions. You need to do np.fft.fftn(b, axes=(1, 2))! – Cris Luengo Mar 6 at 5:38
1

pyfftw, wrapping the FFTW library, is likely faster than the FFTPACK library wrapped by np.fft and scipy.fftpack. After all, FFTW stands for Fastest Fourier Transform in the West.

The minimal code is:

import numpy as np
import pyfftw
import multiprocessing
b = np.random.random((100, 256, 256))
bb = pyfftw.empty_aligned((100,256, 256), dtype='float64')
bf= pyfftw.empty_aligned((100,256, 129), dtype='complex128')
fft_object_b = pyfftw.FFTW(bb, bf,axes=(1,2),flags=('FFTW_MEASURE',), direction='FFTW_FORWARD',threads=multiprocessing.cpu_count())
bb=b
fft_object_b(bb)

Here is an extended code timing the execution of np.fft and pyfftw:

import numpy as np
from timeit import default_timer as timer
import multiprocessing
a = np.random.random((256, 256))
b = np.random.random((100, 256, 256))

start = timer()
for i in range(10):
    np.fft.fft2(a)
end = timer()
print"np.fft.fft2, 1 slice", (end - start)/10

start = timer()
for i in range(10):
     bf=np.fft.fftn(b, axes=(1, 2,))
end = timer()
print "np.fft.fftn, 100 slices", (end - start)/10
print "bf[3,42,42]",bf[3,42,42]


import pyfftw

aa = pyfftw.empty_aligned((256, 256), dtype='float64')
af= pyfftw.empty_aligned((256, 129), dtype='complex128')
bb = pyfftw.empty_aligned((100,256, 256), dtype='float64')
bf= pyfftw.empty_aligned((100,256, 129), dtype='complex128')
print 'number of threads:' , multiprocessing.cpu_count()

fft_object_a = pyfftw.FFTW(aa, af,axes=(0,1), flags=('FFTW_MEASURE',), direction='FFTW_FORWARD',threads=multiprocessing.cpu_count())

fft_object_b = pyfftw.FFTW(bb, bf,axes=(1,2),flags=('FFTW_MEASURE',), direction='FFTW_FORWARD',threads=multiprocessing.cpu_count())


aa=a
bb=b
start = timer()
for i in range(10):
    fft_object_a(aa)
end = timer()
print "pyfftw, 1 slice",(end - start)/10

start = timer()
for i in range(10):
    fft_object_b(bb)
end = timer()
print "pyfftw, 100 slices", (end - start)/10
print "bf[3,42,42]",bf[3,42,42]

Finally, the outcome is a significant speed up: pyfftw proves 10 times faster than np.fft on my computer., using 2 threads.

np.fft.fft2, 1 slice 0.00459032058716
np.fft.fftn, 100 slices 0.478203487396
bf[3,42,42] (-38.190256258791734+43.03902512127183j)
number of threads: 2
pyfftw, 1 slice 0.000421094894409
pyfftw, 100 slices 0.0439268112183
bf[3,42,42] (-38.19025625879178+43.03902512127183j)

Your computer seems much better than mine!

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