127

How can I convert the output of PHP's filesize() function to a nice format with MegaBytes, KiloBytes etc?

like:

  • if the size is less than 1 MB, show the size in KB
  • if it's between 1 MB - 1 GB show it in MB
  • if it's larger - in GB

12 Answers 12

277
0

Here is a sample:

<?php
// Snippet from PHP Share: http://www.phpshare.org

    function formatSizeUnits($bytes)
    {
        if ($bytes >= 1073741824)
        {
            $bytes = number_format($bytes / 1073741824, 2) . ' GB';
        }
        elseif ($bytes >= 1048576)
        {
            $bytes = number_format($bytes / 1048576, 2) . ' MB';
        }
        elseif ($bytes >= 1024)
        {
            $bytes = number_format($bytes / 1024, 2) . ' KB';
        }
        elseif ($bytes > 1)
        {
            $bytes = $bytes . ' bytes';
        }
        elseif ($bytes == 1)
        {
            $bytes = $bytes . ' byte';
        }
        else
        {
            $bytes = '0 bytes';
        }

        return $bytes;
}
?>
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    This answer is more efficient than the others below. It avoids using the log function or successive division statements to identify the unit. – Ali Gangji May 25 '13 at 2:34
  • That is a brilliant solution, thank you for this awesome function - exactly what I was looking for. – justinhartman Dec 24 '13 at 10:18
  • Beautiful. Thank you. – felwithe Jun 13 '14 at 2:18
  • Nice one. Keep it up – Prabhu Nandan Kumar Feb 26 '19 at 10:11
65
1

Even nicer is this version I created from a plugin I found:

function filesize_formatted($path)
{
    $size = filesize($path);
    $units = array( 'B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB', 'EB', 'ZB', 'YB');
    $power = $size > 0 ? floor(log($size, 1024)) : 0;
    return number_format($size / pow(1024, $power), 2, '.', ',') . ' ' . $units[$power];
}

Note from filesize() doc

Because PHP's integer type is signed and many platforms use 32bit integers, some filesystem functions may return unexpected results for files which are larger than 2GB

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Why is it "nicer" tho? It does almost the same thing as my version, except that it'll return the wrong size for files over 2GB (plus the OP never asked for the remaining units of power). – Alix Axel Nov 19 '12 at 13:35
  • 6
    @AlixAxel It is nicer, because it is half the size and still easy to read. Also I bet it is faster. But hey, it's not personal. I didn't think of it myself. Your version is cool too! Upvoted it ;) – PiTheNumber Nov 19 '12 at 16:16
  • 1
    Adnan posted the most verbose, but also the most efficient answer. Using the log function to identify the units is much slower than using simple inequalities. Even using successive division statements in a loop is much faster than using log – Ali Gangji May 25 '13 at 2:41
  • 1
    @PiTheNumber Consider note at filesize() doc: "Because PHP's integer type is signed and many platforms use 32bit integers, some filesystem functions may return unexpected results for files which are larger than 2GB". For this and for many more reasons I don't quite believe that someone would ever use PHP to operate on files, which size is counted in TB, not mentioning higher scales. Plus, I doubt your function is faster than Alix Axel's as you're using pow function, similar in resources consumption to log used by Alix. – trejder Sep 17 '13 at 9:33
  • I didn't say it is faster or something. Only that it looks nicer. But just for fun I tried to make a benchmark but I don't got any usable results. I should not run it on codepad: codepad.org/o6cWsjIi – PiTheNumber Sep 17 '13 at 10:48
42
0

A cleaner approach:

function Size($path)
{
    $bytes = sprintf('%u', filesize($path));

    if ($bytes > 0)
    {
        $unit = intval(log($bytes, 1024));
        $units = array('B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB');

        if (array_key_exists($unit, $units) === true)
        {
            return sprintf('%d %s', $bytes / pow(1024, $unit), $units[$unit]);
        }
    }

    return $bytes;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This looks cleaner but using log to identify the units is much more costly than using a few simple inequalities. – Ali Gangji May 25 '13 at 2:38
  • @AliGangji: True, between 0.1% and 42% more costly to be precise (depending on which if condition $bytes falls into). – Alix Axel May 25 '13 at 3:48
  • @AliGangji: To expand on my last comment, seems like for values <= 1023 bytes the log approach is on average ~40% slower but for 1024 and above I get consistent averages on the order of 0.1%. Interesting! – Alix Axel May 25 '13 at 3:55
  • @AlixAxel Wouldn't that be, because PHP parser analyses if block bottom-top, i.e. starting from single (last) else and going up through all elseif until finally reaching first (in order) if? Just wandering, why you're getting such results? – trejder Sep 17 '13 at 9:29
  • 4
    I can't freaking believe you guys are aruging about the 'cost' of a logarithmic equasion in this much cleaner and more elegant answer. How did you even benchmark that difference? And, why not begin the function with a comparisson to >= 1024 before applying a unit appendix if the log ist so costly? – j4k3 Jun 22 '15 at 11:26
15
0

I think this is a better approach. Simple and straight forward.

public function sizeFilter( $bytes )
{
    $label = array( 'B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB' );
    for( $i = 0; $bytes >= 1024 && $i < ( count( $label ) -1 ); $bytes /= 1024, $i++ );
    return( round( $bytes, 2 ) . " " . $label[$i] );
}
| improve this answer | |
7
0

This is based on @adnan's great answer.

Changes:

  • added internal filesize() call
  • return early style
  • saving one concatentation on 1 byte

And you can still pull the filesize() call out of the function, in order to get a pure bytes formatting function. But this works on a file.


/**
 * Formats filesize in human readable way.
 *
 * @param file $file
 * @return string Formatted Filesize, e.g. "113.24 MB".
 */
function filesize_formatted($file)
{
    $bytes = filesize($file);

    if ($bytes >= 1073741824) {
        return number_format($bytes / 1073741824, 2) . ' GB';
    } elseif ($bytes >= 1048576) {
        return number_format($bytes / 1048576, 2) . ' MB';
    } elseif ($bytes >= 1024) {
        return number_format($bytes / 1024, 2) . ' KB';
    } elseif ($bytes > 1) {
        return $bytes . ' bytes';
    } elseif ($bytes == 1) {
        return '1 byte';
    } else {
        return '0 bytes';
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
5
0

This would be a cleaner implementation:

function size2Byte($size) {
    $units = array('KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB');
    $currUnit = '';
    while (count($units) > 0  &&  $size > 1024) {
        $currUnit = array_shift($units);
        $size /= 1024;
    }
    return ($size | 0) . $currUnit;
}
| improve this answer | |
3
0

All the answers to the question uses that 1 kilobyte = 1024 bytes which is wrong! (1 kibibyte = 1024 bytes)

since the question asks to convert file sizes, it should use that 1 kilobyte = 1000 bytes (see https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UnitsPolicy)

function format_bytes($bytes, $precision = 2) {
    $units = array('B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB');

    $bytes = max($bytes, 0);
    $pow = floor(($bytes ? log($bytes) : 0) / log(1000));
    $pow = min($pow, count($units) - 1);

    $bytes /= pow(1000, $pow);

    return round($bytes, $precision) . ' ' . $units[$pow];
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This answer is the only one that is technically correct based on SI standards (except KB should be kB) If you use 1024 as your divisor, then the units should be expressed as KiB, MiB, GiB, TiB, etc. – MortimerCat Jan 11 at 12:25
2
0

A complete example.

<?php
    $units = explode(' ','B KB MB GB TB PB');
    echo("<html><body>");
    echo('file size: ' . format_size(filesize("example.txt")));
    echo("</body></html>");


    function format_size($size) {

        $mod = 1024;

        for ($i = 0; $size > $mod; $i++) {
            $size /= $mod;
        }

        $endIndex = strpos($size, ".")+3;

        return substr( $size, 0, $endIndex).' '.$units[$i];
    }
?>
| improve this answer | |
2
0
function getNiceFileSize($file, $digits = 2){
    if (is_file($file)) {
        $filePath = $file;
        if (!realpath($filePath)) {
            $filePath = $_SERVER["DOCUMENT_ROOT"] . $filePath;
        }
        $fileSize = filesize($filePath);
        $sizes = array("TB", "GB", "MB", "KB", "B");
        $total = count($sizes);
        while ($total-- && $fileSize > 1024) {
            $fileSize /= 1024;
        }
        return round($fileSize, $digits) . " " . $sizes[$total];
    }
    return false;
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

Here is a simple function to convert Bytes to KB, MB, GB, TB :

# Size in Bytes
$size = 14903511;
# Call this function to convert bytes to KB/MB/GB/TB
echo convertToReadableSize($size);
# Output => 14.2 MB

function convertToReadableSize($size){
  $base = log($size) / log(1024);
  $suffix = array("", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB");
  $f_base = floor($base);
  return round(pow(1024, $base - floor($base)), 1) . $suffix[$f_base];
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0
function calcSize($size,$accuracy=2) {
    $units = array('b','Kb','Mb','Gb');
    foreach($units as $n=>$u) {
        $div = pow(1024,$n);
        if($size > $div) $output = number_format($size/$div,$accuracy).$u;
    }
    return $output;
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0
//Get the size in bytes
function calculateFileSize($size)
{
   $sizes = ['B', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB'];
   $count=0;
   if ($size < 1024) {
    return $size . " " . $sizes[$count];
    } else{
     while ($size>1024){
        $size=round($size/1024,2);
        $count++;
    }
     return $size . " " . $sizes[$count];
   }
}
| improve this answer | |

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