15

Is it possible to conditionally import assets when creating a React app using create-react-app? I'm aware of the require syntax - example:

import React from "react";


const path = process.env.REACT_APP_TYPE === "app_1" ? "app_1" : "app_2";

const imagePath = require(`./assets/${path}/main.png`);

export default function Test() {
  return (
      <img src={imagePath} alt="" />
  );
}

This however bundles all my assets no matter what.

It will load the proper image, but it will still bundle all the files together in the final build.

When I look in the dev tools for the final build, I can see all the assets there even though I only wanted to load the assets for app_1.

Am I forced to touch the webpack config, if so, what should I change? or is there another way?

3
  • Is it really bad for your use case to include some files in the build that will not be used?
    – Tholle
    Mar 6, 2019 at 12:20
  • I'm just thinking if I have 20 different versions, each of them having 30 assets. Might be a lot of unnessesary files in the long run.
    – jones
    Mar 6, 2019 at 12:28
  • Looking for the same question, but for pure vanillia. In some rare case it can be really useful
    – Arthur
    Mar 8, 2019 at 13:43

4 Answers 4

9

In the days when React didn't exist we didn't put assets into our JS files. We let the CSS to decide, what assets to load for what selectors. Then you could simply switch a corresponding class on or off for a corresponding element (or even the whole page) and viola it changes color, background, or even a form. Pure magic!

Ah. What times these were!

All above is true and I do not understand why would anyone do or recommend doing it differently. However if you still want to do it (for any reason) - you can! Latest create-react-app comes with out-of-the-box support for lazy loading of arbitrary components via dynamic importing and code splitting. All you need to do is use parenthesized version of the import() statement instead of the regular one. import() takes in a request string as usual and returns a Promise. That's it. Source code of the dynamicaly requested component won't be bundled in, but instead stored in separate chunks to be loaded on demand.

Before:

import OtherComponent from './OtherComponent';

function MyComponent() {   
  return (
    <div>
      <OtherComponent />
    </div>   
  ); 
}

After:

const OtherComponent = React.lazy(() => import('./OtherComponent'));

function MyComponent() {
  return (
    <div>
      <OtherComponent />
    </div>
  );
}

Notice how function MyComponent part is identical.

For those wondering if it is tied to CRA or React, it's not. It's a generic concept that can be used in vanilla JavaScript.

4
  • Works OK for components but what about loading assets which has a dynamic path (dependant on a ENV variable this time around)
    – jones
    Mar 11, 2019 at 14:22
  • I do not see how having a dynamic path makes any difference.
    – jayarjo
    Mar 11, 2019 at 18:10
  • I have not used this, but it seems to me that you would still be bundling the assets to never use them, and if there's no code-splitting there would be no advantage at all since you would be in the same position as the OP currently is. Therefore unless you're using CRA or similar, it will also require playing with Webpack?
    – Abulafia
    Mar 14, 2019 at 12:02
  • Dynamic import is a TC39 proposal, so eventually it might work out of the box, but currently - yes, it's just a concept and requires some dancing around the bonfire. But no, assets won't be bundled and served to the user inside one big file, instead they will be loaded on demand.
    – jayarjo
    Mar 14, 2019 at 16:29
7
+50

You will need to use webpack (or other bundler.) The code is not being run when it's bundled, so the compiler has no way of knowing which branch of logic to follow (app_1 or app_2). Therefore you have to get into the bundler's logic in order to achieve your goal.

However, this isn't as scary as it seems since webpack has built in capability to do this (no 3rd parties required...)

I would look into using webpack.providePlugin

(https://webpack.js.org/plugins/provide-plugin)

or its sibling DefinePlugin

(https://webpack.js.org/plugins/define-plugin)

(I'm afraid these examples are off the top of my head, so it's very unlikely they'll work on first pass.)

Examples:

Both will require a provider module...

// in path/provider.js

module.exports = {
  live: '/path/to/live/image',
  dev: '/path/to/dev/image'
}

Provide Plugin Example

// in webpack

new webpack.ProvidePlugin({
    imagePath: [
      'path/provider',         // the file defined above
      process.env.ENVIRONMENT  // either 'dev' or 'live'
    ]
  }),
// in code

export default function Test() {
  return (
      <img src={imagePath} alt="" />
  );
}

Define Plugin example:

// in webpack

new webpack.DefinePlugin({
  'process.env.ENVIRONMENT': JSON.stringify(process.env.ENVIRONMENT)
});
// in code

var providers = require('path/provider'); // same path provider as above

export default function Test() {
  return (
      <img src={providers[process.env.ENVIRONMENT]} alt="" />
  );
}

In both cases the bundler is forced to collapse your variable to an actual literal value at compile time - before bundling has taken place. Since you have now collapsed the logical path down to a single option, it is now free to only bundle the relevant assets.

2
  • 1
    Good. But the asker mentioned he doesn't want to touch webpack.
    – jayarjo
    Mar 8, 2019 at 14:56
  • 1
    Webpack is OK especially if it's rather simple changes. I will have a look.
    – jones
    Mar 11, 2019 at 14:23
3

You can't do this with default CRA settings.

Because if your dynamic require or dynamic import path is not static, webpack won't be able to determine which assets to include in the final build folder, therefore, it will grab everything from your ./src folder, and put them all to your build folder.

2
  • From what I understand, moving files to the build folder is not the problem, but bundling them in (converting to dataUrls and including into the final JS file) - is.
    – jayarjo
    Mar 14, 2019 at 16:32
  • It will split those additional files to separate chunks.
    – Joseph
    Mar 15, 2019 at 7:35
0

There is a way to do it with default CRA settings

You can add to .env something like

REACT_APP_SKIN=1

Put your skin assets in public/css1, public/css2 etc. And include them in public/index.html using code like

<link href="/css%REACT_APP_SKIN%/theme.css" rel="stylesheet">

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