0

Consider the following:

unique_ptr<int> foo = make_unique<int>(42);

auto lambda = [bar = move(foo)]()
    {
        /* Do something with bar */
    };

lambda(); // No issues invoking this

cout << "*foo = " << *foo; //Attempts to dereference foo will segfault

Capturing things like a unique_ptr requires use of std::move, so as to maintain the uniqueness of unique_ptr. But what to do when I want to use that same smart pointer after the lambda is destructed? Using foo will give a segfault, and bar is out of scope by that point.

Perhaps unorthodox use of lambda aside, how do I get my unique_ptr back? Is it trapped in the lambda forever?

  • Note that you cannot use the unique_ptr after it's been moved. It doesn't actually matter whether or not the lambda is destructed. After the move(foo), foo is in the "moved from" state already and you cannot dereference it anymore. The only thing you are allowed to do with it is assign something new to it. – Nikos C. Mar 6 at 17:56
6

This can be solved by capturing by reference.

auto lambda = [&]()
    {
        /* Do something with foo */
    };

// or

auto lambda = [&foo]()
    {
        /* Do something with foo */
    };

Allows you to use foo, without actually moving it.

The only caveat with this is it is up to you to ensure the lifetime of the lambda does not exceed that of the pointer. If it can/does, then you should consider a shared ownership method like using a std::shared_ptr instead.

  • 3
    At that point you might as well just capture [int_ptr = foo.get()]. It's a non-owning pointer anyway. Holding references to unique_ptr seems a bit weird. – Nikos C. Mar 6 at 18:04
  • This is very helpful, thank you! – vkn Mar 6 at 20:20
  • @vkn You're welcome. Glad to help. – NathanOliver Mar 6 at 20:36
3

But what to do when I want to use that same smart pointer after the lambda is destructed?

You use std::shared_ptr and don't move something you want to reuse.

auto foo = std::make_shared(42);
auto lambda = [bar=foo]()
{
    /* Do something with bar */
};
lambda(); // No issues invoking this
cout << "*foo = " << *foo; // also fine
  • This makes sense, I guess I'd underestimated just how unique the unique_ptr is meant to be. Many thanks! – vkn Mar 6 at 20:21

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