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Calling .Execute() on a ReactiveCommand hangs or creates a deadlock in the example below. Why is this happening, and what is the best way to avoid it?

The error only occurs when Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher is called. The obvious answer, to not call it, is unfortunately not an option in the larger project.

I have nuget packages reactiveui-core and reactiveui-winforms in the project, both v7.4.0. I'm running nunit tests from Visual Studio with Resharper.

The code is an NUnit test fixture, note the TimeoutAfterAsync is a helper method to cancel the test after a certain timeout, the behaviour is observed without this wrapper

[TestFixture]
public class ReactiveCommandTests
{
    private static async Task<bool> ExecuteCommand()
    {
        await Task.Delay(1000);
        return true;
    }

    public static ReactiveCommand<Unit, bool> Command = ReactiveCommand.CreateFromTask(ExecuteCommand);
    public static ReactiveCommand<Unit, bool> CommandOnTaskpoolScheduler = ReactiveCommand.CreateFromTask(ExecuteCommand, outputScheduler: RxApp.TaskpoolScheduler);
    public static ReactiveCommand<Unit, bool> CommandAfterDispatcherInvoked = ReactiveCommand.CreateFromTask(ExecuteCommand);



    [Test, Order(1)]
    public async Task Test()
    {
        //THIS WORKS
        try
        {
            await TimeoutAfterAsync(
                Command.Execute(),
                TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5),
                "control");
        }
        catch (TimeoutException)
        {
            Assert.Fail("Control case timed out (not expected)");
        }
    }

    [Test, Order(2)]
    public async Task Test_CreateCommandAfterDispatcherCall()
    {
        //This line causes unwanted behaviour
        var x = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher;

        //THIS FAILS
        try
        {
            await TimeoutAfterAsync(
                CommandAfterDispatcherInvoked.Execute(),
                TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5),
                "after dispatcher creation");
        }
        catch (TimeoutException)
        {
            Assert.Fail("Executing commandAfterDispatcherInvoked timed out (expected, but not understood");
        }
    }

    [Test, Order(3)]
    public async Task Test_CreateCommandWithThreadpoolScheduler()
    {
        //This line causes unwanted behaviour
        var x = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher;

        //THIS WORKS AGAIN (using ThreadpoolScheduler when creating ReactiveCommand)
        try
        {
            await TimeoutAfterAsync(
                CommandOnTaskpoolScheduler.Execute(),
                TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5),
                "after dispatcher creation, with thread pool");
        }
        catch (TimeoutException)
        {
            Assert.Fail("ThreadpoolScheduler case timed out (not expected)");
        }
    }

    private static async Task<TResult> TimeoutAfterAsync<TResult>(IObservable<TResult> observable,
        TimeSpan timeout,
        string context)
    {
        var task = observable .ToTask();
        var result = await Task.WhenAny(task, Task.Delay(timeout));
        if (result == task)
        {
            // Task completed within timeout.
            return task.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
        }
        else
        {
            // Task timed out.
            throw new TimeoutException(context);
        }
    }
}
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Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher is a fun one; it creates a dispatcher for the current thread if it doesn't already have one! This causes a problem for unit tests, since the new dispatcher is created for a thread pool thread, which isn't STA and doesn't have a message pump.

The ideal solution is to not call CurrentDispatcher. Ever. Use await or IProgress<T> or (if you must) SynchronizationContext to communicate results/progress/events to the UI thread. These abstractions are much easier to create a test environment for.

But for now, you may be able to use WpfContext, an old utility type that was included in early versions of the Async CTP. WpfContext.Run will take a delegate, create a dispatcher context for the current thread, and execute the delegate within that dispatcher context, pumping its messages until the asynchronous operations have completed.

  • Thanks, in the end I was able to remove CurrentDispatcher in the tests – sprague44 Mar 12 at 16:51

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