2

Consider this code:

public class TreeNode<T extends TreeNode<T, E>, E> {
    protected T parent;
    protected E data;
    protected List<T> children = new ArrayList<T>();

    public TreeNode(T parent, E data) {
        this.parent = parent;
        this.data = data;
    }

    public T getRoot() {
        if (parent == null) {
            return this;       //<---- Problem is here!
        } else {
            return getParent().getRoot();

        }
    }

    public T getParent() {
        if (parent == null) {
           throw new RuntimeException("This already the parent!");
        } else {
            return parent;
        }
    }
}

/*
  incompatible types
    required: T
    found:    TreeNode<T,E>
*/

How can I fix that and make my code work?

  • Did you try my fix? – jmg Apr 1 '11 at 14:26
  • Yes, it removed the need to cast before getParent().getRoot(). I wonder how to remove the last cast in return (T) this; – soc Apr 2 '11 at 16:57
2

You want to use the so-called getThis() trick. Declare a new method like so:

/** Subclasses must implement this method as {@code return this;} */
protected abstract T getThis();

Then when you need to use this, just call getThis() instead. As a side note, implementing this method will confound a class like BadNode in @Michael Williamson's answer, thus making it harder to write such a class in the first place (which is a good thing).

  • Mhhh, I would prefer if subclasses wouldn't have to implement anything datastructure-related. That's more or less what I expected, implementing the type on a per-class base. But I would like to be able to use TreeNode without sub-classing it too. – soc Apr 3 '11 at 11:18
  • I'm not sure if it's possible to do it without subclassing. You could always just declare a simple final class ConcreteTreeNode<E> extends TreeNode<ConcreteTreeNode,E>{} – Matt McHenry Apr 3 '11 at 19:29
1

It's not guaranteed that the type T is the same as the type of the class itself, so you need to add a cast to the line that doesn't compile:

public T getRoot() {
    if (parent == null) {
        return (T)this;
    } else {
        return getParent();
    }
}

To give a simple example of code that will expose the typing error:

public class GoodNode extends TreeNode<GoodNode, Integer> {
    public GoodNode(GoodNode parent, Integer data) {
        super(parent, data);
    }
}

public class BadNode extends TreeNode<GoodNode, Integer> {
    public BadNode(GoodNode parent, Integer data) {
        super(parent, data);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        GoodNode node = new BadNode(null, null).getRoot();
    }
}

Running BadNode.main causes a typing error since BadNode(null, null).getRoot() returns an object of class BadNode (since it has no parent), but because BadNode extends TreeNode<GoodNode, Integer>, the return type of getRoot() is GoodNode. Since BadNode cannot be cast to GoodNode, there's a class cast exception:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassCastException: BadNode cannot be cast to GoodNode
    at BadNode.main(BadNode.java:7)
  • Yes, I did that a few seconds ago. But I'm not sure if this is safe. Is there a chance that this will fail at runtime? – soc Mar 31 '11 at 18:40
1

Maybe you are trying to be "too generic"?

public class TreeNode<E> {
    protected TreeNode<E> parent;
    protected E data;
    protected List<TreeNode<E>> children = new ArrayList<TreeNode<E>>();

    public TreeNode(T parent, E data) {
        this.parent = parent;
        this.data = data;
    }

    public TreeNode<E> getRoot() {
        if (parent == null) {
            return this;       
        } else {
            return getParent(); // <--- ???
        }
    }
...
}

BTW: You might want to call something along the lines of parent.getRoot() instead of getParent().

  • Yes, thanks. Fixed that. – soc Apr 1 '11 at 10:00
  • The problem is that I want that sub-typing of TreeNode works. That's why the second generic type is there. – soc Apr 2 '11 at 16:59
  • What you want is to sub-type the whole tree, not just some nodes? Then the page on the getThis() trick in @matt-mchenry's answer is likely to be what you are looking for. – subsub Apr 3 '11 at 7:42
1

Why do you use a raw type in the extends clause? That might hinder type inference. Try the following:

public class TreeNode<T extends TreeNode<T,E>, E> {
  • Thanks! I missed that. I updated my question accordingly. – soc Apr 2 '11 at 16:50

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