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I'm trying to move one of my variables (v4) to the second axis. I know that ggplot does not "plot on the secondary axis", but that you can re-escalate the specific variable and the right axis using the left axis. However, I haven't been able to re-escalate both so that the right axis still shows the correct measures of the variable. An example were I'm trying the solutions that I found online:

year <- c(1990,2000,2010,2020)
v1 <- c(90,100,103,115)
v2 <- c(90,100,107,125)
v2 <- c(90,100,107,125)
v3 <- c(90,100,104,120)
v4 <- c(90,100,150,200)

df <- data.frame(year,v1,v2,v3,v4)

figureA <- ggplot(df, aes(year)) +
  geom_ribbon(data=subset(df, year >= 2000), aes(ymin=v1, ymax=v2), fill="blue", alpha=0.10) +
  geom_line(aes(y = v1, color = "v1"), size=1.5) +
  geom_line(aes(y = v2, color = "v2"), size=1.5) +
  geom_line(aes(y = v3, color = "v3"), size=1.5) + 
  geom_line(aes(y = v4/2+50, color = "v4"), size=1.5) +
  scale_y_continuous(sec.axis = sec_axis(~.*2, name = "v4"))

figureA

Given the theoretical relationship of the variables, it makes sense to put v4 on the second axis, however, with the solution that I found online, the values on the right axis do not correspond to the variable.

  • Multiple geoms are usually a sign that you need to reshape your data. The figure is also missing. – NelsonGon Mar 7 at 15:05
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    Can you explain what's the theoretical relationship between the variables? Generally speaking, the transformation you apply to the data of the geom_line should be the opposite of the transformation you apply to the secondary axis (e.g., *2 and /2) - so in your example, if one is /2+50, the sec_axis formula should be ~.*2-50. – iod Mar 7 at 15:08
  • @NelsonGon I have my data in that shape because it is the only way I was able to plot many geom_line in combination with a shaded area using ggplot, however, I switched to Plotly that works with panel and allwos for a second axis, solving both problems. – DW_85 Mar 8 at 23:06
  • @iod, The actual variables are two dependency ratios. This are demographic indicators of population aging. Both are built with the same data, but with different formulas, hence, one shows a slower pace of aging than the other. I realised the formula does not work because I added a constant (+50 in my case). It will only work if you multiply or divide. That helps, but the scale does not change much. The best option is to use plotly I think. – DW_85 Mar 8 at 23:09
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Following iod comment, this code showing values of v4 corresponding with right ixis

figureA <- ggplot(df, aes(year)) +
  geom_ribbon(data=subset(df, year >= 2000), aes(ymin=v1, ymax=v2), fill="blue", alpha=0.10) +
  geom_line(aes(y = v1, color = "v1"), size=1.5) +
  geom_line(aes(y = v2, color = "v2"), size=1.5) +
  geom_line(aes(y = v3, color = "v3"), size=1.5) + 
  geom_line(aes(y = v4/2, color = "v4"), size=1.5) +
  scale_y_continuous(sec.axis = sec_axis(~.*2, name = "v4"))

Problem in '+50'

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