4

I need help counting number of days in a given date range. Here is my data set:

dat<- data.frame(a=c(seq(as.Date("2018-01-01"), as.Date("2018-01-3"), 1),
                 seq(as.Date("2018-01-08"), as.Date("2018-01-10"), 1),
                 seq(as.Date("2018-01-23"), as.Date("2018-01-31"), 1),
                 seq(as.Date("2018-03-01"), as.Date("2018-03-05"), 1)), 
             b= c(rep("x",5), rep("y",5), rep("x",5), rep("y",5)) )



        a     b
1  2018-01-01 x
2  2018-01-02 x
3  2018-01-03 x
4  2018-01-08 x
5  2018-01-09 x
6  2018-01-10 y
7  2018-01-23 y
8  2018-01-24 y
9  2018-01-25 y
10 2018-01-26 y
11 2018-01-27 x
12 2018-01-28 x
13 2018-01-29 x
14 2018-01-30 x
15 2018-01-31 x
16 2018-03-01 y
17 2018-03-02 y
18 2018-03-03 y
19 2018-03-04 y
20 2018-03-05 y

This is reports received from a ship and "x" and "y" are different types of fuel. On 01,02 and 03 Jan, ship reported it was using "x" type fuel. Then ship didn't report anything on the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th of Jan. Ship sent another report on 8th (which is a consolidation of the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th of Jan) that it is still using fuel type "x". If ship changes its fuel type to "y", it will send out a report.

I want to count number of days when the fuel type is "x" and number of days when fuel type is "y". If there is a gap between the dates like for example

1  2018-01-01 x
2  2018-01-02 x
3  2018-01-03 x
4  2018-01-08 x
5  2018-01-09 x

then the number of days between the 1st and 5th row should be 8 days (09/Jan -01/Jan). So count of "x" is 8 days Then it should calculate the next counter in column b which is "y".

6  2018-01-10 y
7  2018-01-23 y
8  2018-01-24 y
9  2018-01-25 y
10 2018-01-26 y

Here diff in days is 16 days (26/Jan-10-Jan). So count of "y" is 16 days.

Then again we have "x":

11 2018-01-27 x
12 2018-01-28 x
13 2018-01-29 x
14 2018-01-30 x
15 2018-01-31 x

Here, count of "x" is 4 days (31/Jan-27/Jan). So total count of "x" is (8+4)= 12 days. And we count similarly of "y".

16 2018-03-01 y
17 2018-03-02 y
18 2018-03-03 y
19 2018-03-04 y
20 2018-03-05 y

Here is the catch. Ship didn't report anything in February. Since last report fuel type use was "x", which was reported on 31/Jan, it means that entire February, ship was using fuel type "x" and therefore we need to add 28 days of february to "x" which makes it (8+4+28)= 40 days

And "y" count is (16+4)=21 days

I can't seem to understand how to code the logic. Any help would be appreciated.

  • Are you looking for total days in each contiguous streak of x or y, or total x and y overall? Either way, seems helpful to add the days each row represents. With dplyr, I would use mutate(days_to_next = lead(a) - a). – Jon Spring Mar 7 at 20:01
  • 1
    Your counting seems a bit off... 2018-01-01 until 2018-01-09 is not 8 days, but 9... fortunately you can let R do the counting for you (see answer) ;-) – Wimpel Mar 7 at 20:12
2

With Jon Spring's approach in the comments with dplyr :

dat %>% mutate(days_to_next = lead(a) - a) %>% 
  group_by(b) %>% 
  summarise(N = sum(days_to_next, na.rm = TRUE))

EDIT: We could also do it we an old school while loop. This was actually the first idea I had before seeing @JonSpring's answer. Anyway, I was surprised to see that the while loop performs relatively well in comparison!

library(data.table)
library(dplyr)
library(microbenchmark)

dat<- data.frame(a=c(seq(as.Date("2018-01-01"), as.Date("2018-01-3"), 1),
                     seq(as.Date("2018-01-08"), as.Date("2018-01-10"), 1),
                     seq(as.Date("2018-01-23"), as.Date("2018-01-31"), 1),
                     seq(as.Date("2018-03-01"), as.Date("2018-03-05"), 1)), 
                 b= c(rep("x",5), rep("y",5), rep("x",5), rep("y",5)) )

dat <- arrange(dat, a) # make sure data is arranged from oldest to most recent !
while_loop <- function(dat){ 
  ## @IsmailMüller
  i <- 1 # initialize for the while loop
  counts <- c("x"=0,"y"=0) # intilise counts
  while(i < nrow(dat)){
  # what's the fuel on this position ?
  fuel <- dat$b[i]
  # what's the date on this position ?
  date_this_fuel <- dat$a[i]

  # find next observation with different fuel !
  if(any(dat$b[i:nrow(dat) ] != fuel) ){ # Need to ensure that we have different fuels left in the remaining data
    other_fuel_position <- i-1 + min(which( dat$b[i:nrow(dat) ] != fuel)) # find the next position where the fuel is different of what we have in i
  } else {
    other_fuel_position <- nrow(dat) # if there is only one sort of fuel left, then go to the last row of the dataset
  }

  # Get the date where the fuel changes
  date_other_fuel <- dat$a[ other_fuel_position ] 
  # Add the number of days between the two date to to overall count
  counts[fuel] <- counts[fuel] + (date_other_fuel-date_this_fuel)

  # set the i where the fuel changes for next iteration
  i = other_fuel_position
  }
}


dplyr_f <- function(dat){
  # @JonSpring @IsmailMüller
  dat %>% mutate(days_to_next = lead(a) - a) %>% 
    group_by(b) %>% 
    summarise(N = sum(days_to_next, na.rm = TRUE))
}

data.table_f1 <- function(dat){
  ## @Wimpel
  #create sample data
  dt1 <- setDT(dat)
  #create a data.table with one row for each day within the range of dt1
  dt2 <- data.table( a = seq( min( dt1$a ), max( dt1$a), by = "days") )
  #perform rolling join to get the last 'b' from dt1 on all dates in dt2
  dt2[, b := dt1[dt2, b, on = "a", roll = TRUE]][]
  #summarise by b (number of rows = number of days, so we can use .N)
  dt2[, (days = .N), by = "b"]
}

data.table_f2 <- function(dat){
  ## @Frank
  setDT(dat)
  res <- dat[, .(d_start = first(a)), by=.(b, g = rleid(b))]
  res[, dur := shift(d_start, type="lead", fill=max(dat$a)) - d_start][]
  res[!is.na(dur), .(tot_dur = sum(dur)), by=b]
}

microbenchmark(while_loop(dat), data.table_f1(dat),data.table_f2(dat), dplyr_f(dat))
# expr                min       lq        mean    median       uq      max  neval
# while_loop(dat)     1.755670 1.868047 2.308720 1.905485 1.989556 27.02236   100
# data.table_f1(dat)  3.874152 4.143840 4.559838 4.268966 4.666345 14.59840   100
# data.table_f2(dat)  3.269300 3.470870 4.090084 3.660293 4.130438 17.41423   100
# dplyr_f(dat)        4.373799 4.646995 5.269530 4.802282 5.258533 14.71824   100
  • 1
    Thanks for adding a benchmark -- interesting to see. Fyi, it will probably be more informative with a larger example dat – Frank Mar 7 at 21:27
  • Yes I totally agree. – Ismail Müller Mar 8 at 6:55
3

data.table approach

library(data.table)
#create sample data
dt1 <- setDT(dat)
#create a data.table with one row for each day within the range of dt1
dt2 <- data.table( a = seq( min( dt1$a ), max( dt1$a), by = "days") )

#perform rolling join to get the last 'b' from dt1 on all dates in dt2
dt2[, b := dt1[dt2, b, on = "a", roll = TRUE]][]
#summarise by b (number of rows = number of days, so we can use .N)
dt2[, (days = .N), by = "b"]
#    b  N
# 1: x 42
# 2: y 22
2

Another data.table approach (substantially the same as @IsmailMüller's dplyr answer):

library(data.table)
setDT(dat)

res <- dat[, .(d_start = first(a)), by=.(b, g = rleid(b))]
res[, dur := shift(d_start, type="lead") - d_start][]

   b g    d_start     dur
1: x 1 2018-01-01  9 days
2: y 2 2018-01-10 17 days
3: x 3 2018-01-27 33 days
4: y 4 2018-03-01 NA days

NA seems like the right value for the final spell since you do not know when it ends. If you want to use the latest record there, though...

res[, dur := shift(d_start, type="lead", fill=max(dat$a)) - d_start][]

   b g    d_start     dur
1: x 1 2018-01-01  9 days
2: y 2 2018-01-10 17 days
3: x 3 2018-01-27 33 days
4: y 4 2018-03-01  4 days

Either way, to get the sum per fuel type, you can do

res[!is.na(dur), .(tot_dur = sum(dur)), by=b]

   b tot_dur
1: x 42 days
2: y 21 days
# these results are for the fill= way

Comment. By taking the first record per run (with rleid), this is reducing the number of computations sum(x - shift/lead(x)) that need to be done, but this is unlikely to matter unless your data is very large.

2

Straightforward approach using dplyr/tidyr:

library(tidyverse)

dat %>%
  complete(a = full_seq(a, 1)) %>% 
  fill(b) %>%
  count(b)

Which returns:

# A tibble: 2 x 2
  b         n
  <fct> <int>
1 x        42
2 y        22

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