Basically, I have a UserControl that uses a DynamicResources. The application compiles and runs fine using that resource, but it's a bit annoying to see this warning message. It makes me wonder if I'm doing it right and it's just a false positive, or if I'm doing it wrong and happen to slip through the cracks in it working.

<Grid Background="{DynamicResource AppDefaultBackgroundColor}">
...
</Grid>

So, if I used it correctly, how can I get rid of this warning message?
If I did not use it appropriately, what should it look like so I don't get a warning?

P.S. My application works and runs fine, but I prefer to not have any compilation warnings when compiling.

  • 2
    Where is the resource being loaded from? You may just need to change the compilation order of your projects. – David Veeneman Mar 31 '11 at 20:52
  • From the App.xaml, which happens to be the same project that is housing this UserControl. – m-y Apr 1 '11 at 0:54
  • 2
    If you are using a designer: Throw it out, get's rid of 90% of all false warnings and errors. (Note: That number is made up and may not be completely accurate) – H.B. Apr 1 '11 at 2:26
  • 2
    I am using VS 2010 too, but i do not use its designer. (Right click a XAML file -> Open with... -> Source Code (Text) Editor -> Set as Default -> OK) I never really get any warnings that way and it happened a few times already that people said something about warnings unknown to me here on SO when i offered a solution the designer just could not handle. – H.B. Apr 1 '11 at 5:59
  • 1
    Why is it a DynamicResource? If the resource is in your App.xaml and the usercontrol is in the same assembly; why not make it a StaticResource! – Kolky Nov 23 '11 at 12:34

You can map your resource like this

<Resources>
  <ResourceDictionary>
    <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
      <ResourceDictionary Source="..\Resources\Theme.xaml" />
    </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
  </ResourceDictionary>
</Resources>

Theme.xaml must contain 'AppDefaultBackgroundColor' like this

 <Color x:Key="AppDefaultBackgroundColor">#FF77C6FB</Color>
  • I'm guessing the **Source is from attempting to show bolded text inside a code block? Just wondering since it doesn't like that syntax in the designer. – Zack Aug 20 '15 at 21:24

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