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I was working on this problem on hackerrank

Given a numerator and divisor of unsigned integers, print out the quotient and remainder . You cannot use divide, cannot use mod, and you want to optimize for speed

My initial idea was (in python)

def divide_problem(num, div):
    quotient = 1
    while (div * quotient) < num:
        quotient += 1
    remainder = (div*quotient) - num

    print(quotient, "quotient")
    print(remainder, 'remainder')


print(divide_problem(31, 5))

But with this approach, I am getting 7 as the quotient and 4 as the remainder. I was able to find the correct solution online which is:

def divide_problem(num, div):
    quotient = 1
    while num - (quotient * div) >= div:
        print(num - (quotient * div), "loop")
        quotient += 1
    remainder = num - (quotient * div)

    print(quotient, "quotient")
    print(remainder, 'remainder')


print(divide_problem(31, 5))

I wasn't able to figure out the conditional statement for the while loop

while num - (quotient * div) >= div:

What would be the thought process to come up with that statement?

  • "and you want to optimize for speed". Ignoring the fact that "python" and "speed" are mutually exclusive, this solution that you found is not at all optimized for speed. You can easily demonstrate that with print(divide_problem(1000000000,1). It also just plain wrong for print(divide_problem(4,5). – user3386109 Mar 8 at 7:42
  • 1
    @user3386109 when sites like these say to optimize for speed, they mean algorithmically. They have multipliers in place to compensate for the innate slowness of a language. This is not "hey, I want to find the next mersenne prime in python", but rather "write a fast algorithm, using a language you feel most comfortable". – Dillon Davis Mar 8 at 7:54
  • 1
    Also, I would just like to point out a / b == exp(log(a) - log(b)) – Dillon Davis Mar 8 at 7:59
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It's just simply because the remainder can NOT be bigger than the divider.

And num - (quotient * div) gives exactly the remainder.

So if num - (quotient * div) is bigger the divider, it means the quotient is not big enough.

That's why it need to keep doing it until the remainder is smaller than the divider.

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num - (quotient*div) >= div is mathematically the same as ((quotient+1) * div) <= num

This is pretty much the same idea you had, but you made a mistake. When I'm working out stuff like this , I always test the boundary conditions.

Your condition says "the quotient is too small if quotient*div < num". So try out some cases where quotient*div == num-1 and make sure the quotient really is too small. And try out some cases where quotient*div == num and make sure the quotient really is big enough.

Now, there is also a level 2 here that you might not need to worry about. The precise form used in the 2nd loop -- num - (quotient*div) >= div -- is carefully written not to create any intermediate results that are bigger than num and div. That ensures that you will get the correct answers even if you use the largest possible integers for num and/or div.

If you write it as ((quotient+1) * div) <= num, then it's possible for (quotient+1)*div to be too big to represent as an integer, which could cause the condition to get the wrong answer (in many languages and at least in some versions of python IIRC).

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The official solution is just an inefficient implementation of repeated subtraction that replaces a simple subtraction with a more-complicated multiplication; if you're going to use repeated subtraction, you should at least get rid of the multiplication:

def divide(num, div):
    quot = 0
    while div <= num:
        quot += 1
        num -= div
    return quot, num

Repeated subtraction is not "optimized for speed," as you will see if you call divide(1000000000,3). We could instead use repeated subtraction of squares of the divisor, or squares of squares of the divisor, or ..., going on until the square of the square of the ... divisor exceeds the number. As an example, consider the problem divide(1000000000,3) mentioned above. We first make a list of squares:

3 * 3 = 9
9 * 9 = 81
81 * 81 = 6561
6561 * 6561 = 43046721

We stop there because the next squaring exceeds the target. Now we call the naive divide-by-repeated-subtraction algorithm repeatedly on each remainder:

divide(1000000000, 43046721) = (23, 9925417)
divide(9925417, 6561) = (1512, 5185)
divide(5185, 81) = (64, 1)
divide(1, 9) = (0, 1)
divide(1, 3) = (0, 1)

The final remainder is 1. The quotient is:

0*3/3 + 0*9/3 + 64*81/3 + 1512*6561/3 + 23*43046721/3 = 333333333

and we performed only 23 + 1512 + 64 = 1599 subtractions instead of the 333,333,333 subtractions of the official solution. Here's the code:

def divide(num, div):
    divs, sqs, sum = [div], [1], 0
    while divs[-1] * divs[-1] < num:
        divs.append(divs[-1] * divs[-1])
        sqs.append(sqs[-1] * sqs[-1] * div)
    while divs:
        div, sq = divs.pop(), sqs.pop()
        quot = 0
        while div <= num:
            quot += 1
            num -= div
        sum += (quot * sq)
    return sum, num

The first while computes and stacks the squares, and also each of the squares divided by div, so there is no division in the final code. After the first while, the divs and sqs stacks look like this:

divs = [3, 9, 81, 6561, 43046721]
sqs  = [1, 3, 27, 2187, 14348907]

The second while repeatedly pops the two stacks, performs the naive divide-by-repeated-subtraction algorithm in the third while, and accumulates the sum. That's very much faster than the official solution, and not much more complicated.

You can run the program at https://ideone.com/CgVT1i.

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