I am looking for producing success/fail messages which are right aligned in bash. An example would be what apache2 produces on executing: sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 reload etc.

In above example, apache2 produces very nice and concise [OK] or [fail] message which are right aligned.

Also, would love to know how to get the text red, in case, we are to produce a [fail] message.

up vote 8 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash

RED=$(tput setaf 1)
GREEN=$(tput setaf 2)
NORMAL=$(tput sgr0)

col=80 # change this to whatever column you want the output to start at

if <some condition here>; then
  printf '%s%*s%s' "$GREEN" $col "[OK]" "$NORMAL"
else
  printf '%s%*s%s' "$RED" $col "[FAIL]" "$NORMAL"
fi
  • 2
    @SiegeX: col=$(tput cols) is better than hardcoding it and more consistent with the other tput uses. Also, your method eats extra space for the color escapes, which don't actually take any space. printf '%s%*s%s' "$GREEN" $col '[OK]' "$NORMAL" might be cleaner. – geekosaur Mar 31 '11 at 20:59
  • @geek: I decided against tput cols and also tput cup because the former doesn't give you the flexibility to specify the column (it may not look best at the hairy edge) and the latter requires the row #. – SiegeX Mar 31 '11 at 21:04
  • 1
    @SiegeX: You could use tput hpa for the latter. – geekosaur Mar 31 '11 at 21:07
  • @geek: that's right, always forget that one. In either case, I didn't realize that with a single %s printf was eating space on the non-printable chars. So although I think the way I had it was easier to read, your way is more correct and I'll change it. Thanks – SiegeX Mar 31 '11 at 21:12
  • 1
    It's the %*s that eats space; printf assumes that every character in the corresponding string will take space in the field and right-justify as such; it has no concept of escape sequences beyond \n etc. (and doesn't consider even those in computing field widths). – geekosaur Mar 31 '11 at 21:15

Have a look at this thread, might be interesting : how to write a bash script like the ones used in init.d?

On Linux CentOS 6.5, i'm using the /etc/init.d/functions file:

#!/bin/bash
. /etc/init.d/functions # include the said file

action "Description of the action" command

exit 0

assuming command returns 0 on success, positive value if an error occurs. To let the script be easy to read, i use a function call instead of the whole command.

Here is an example:

#!/bin/bash

. /etc/init.d/functions

this_will_fail()
{
    # Do some operations...
    return 1
}

this_will_succeed()
{
    # Do other operations...
    return 0
}


action "This will fail"     this_will_fail
action "This will succeed"  this_will_succeed

exit 0

resulting in: console output (note : french locale ;-) )

Hope it'll help !

  • 1
    note that the import of /etc/init.d/functions modifies the $PATH. – epsilonhalbe Mar 22 '17 at 10:39

Here is something mostly based on the centos 'functions' script, but more stripped down

#!/bin/bash

RES_COL=60
MOVE_TO_COL="printf \\033[${RES_COL}G"

DULL=0
BRIGHT=1

FG_BLACK=30
FG_RED=31
FG_GREEN=32
FG_YELLOW=33
FG_BLUE=34
FG_MAGENTA=35
FG_CYAN=36
FG_WHITE=37

ESC="^[["
NORMAL="${ESC}m"
RESET="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_WHITE};${BG_NULL}m"

BLACK="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_BLACK}m"
RED="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_RED}m"
GREEN="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_GREEN}m"
YELLOW="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_YELLOW}m"
BLUE="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_BLUE}m"
MAGENTA="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_MAGENTA}m"
CYAN="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_CYAN}m"
WHITE="${ESC}${DULL};${FG_WHITE}m"

SETCOLOR_SUCCESS=$GREEN
SETCOLOR_FAILURE=$RED
SETCOLOR_NORMAL=$RESET

echo_success() {
  $MOVE_TO_COL
  printf "["
  printf $SETCOLOR_SUCCESS
  printf $"  OK  "
  printf $SETCOLOR_NORMAL
  printf "]"
  printf "\r"
  return 0
}

echo_failure() {
  $MOVE_TO_COL
  printf "["
  printf $SETCOLOR_FAILURE
  printf $"FAILED"
  printf $SETCOLOR_NORMAL
  printf "]"
  printf "\r"
  return 1
}

action() {
  local STRING rc

  STRING=$1
  printf "$STRING "
  shift
  "$@" && echo_success $"$STRING" || echo_failure $"$STRING"
  rc=$?
  echo
  return $rc
}

action testing true
action testing false

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