7

I tried to fit an implementation of NSA's SPECK in a 8-bit PIC microcontroller. The free version of their compiler (based on CLANG) won't enable optimizations so I ran out of memory. I tried the "trial" version that enables -O2, -O3 and -Os (optimize for size). With -Os It managed to fit my code in the 2K program memory space.

Here's the code:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>

#define ROR(x, r) ((x >> r) | (x << (32 - r)))
#define ROL(x, r) ((x << r) | (x >> (32 - r)))
#define R(x, y, k) (x = ROR(x, 8), x += y, x ^= k, y = ROL(y, 3), y ^= x)
#define ROUNDS 27

void encrypt_block(uint32_t ct[2],
        uint32_t const pt[2],
        uint32_t const K[4]) {
    uint32_t x = pt[0], y = pt[1];
    uint32_t a = K[0], b = K[1], c = K[2], d = K[3];

    R(y, x, a);
    for (int i = 0; i < ROUNDS - 3; i += 3) {
        R(b, a, i);
        R(y, x, a);
        R(c, a, i + 1);
        R(y, x, a);
        R(d, a, i + 2);
        R(y, x, a);
    }
    R(b, a, ROUNDS - 3);
    R(y, x, a);
    R(c, a, ROUNDS - 2);
    R(y, x, a);

    ct[0] = x;
    ct[1] = y;
}

Unfortunately, when debugging it line by line, comparing it to the test vectors in the implementation guide, from page 32, "15 SPECK64/128 Test Vectors", the results difer from the expected results.

Here's a way to call this function:

uint32_t out[2];
uint32_t in[] = { 0x7475432d, 0x3b726574 };
uint32_t key[] = { 0x3020100, 0xb0a0908, 0x13121110, 0x1b1a1918 };

encrypt_block(out, in, key);

assert(out[0] == 0x454e028b);
assert(out[1] == 0x8c6fa548);

The expected value for "out", according to the guide, should be 0x454e028b, 0x8c6fa548. The result I'm getting with -O2 is 0x8FA3FED7 0x53D8CEA8. With -O1, I get 0x454e028b, 0x8c6fa548, which is the correct result.

Step Debugging

The implentation guide includes all the intermediate key schedule other values, so I stepped through the code line by line, comparing the results to the guide.

The expected results for "x" are: 03020100, 131d0309, bbd80d53, 0d334df3. I start step debugging, but when reaching the 4th result, 0d334df3, the debugger window shows 0d334df0 instead. By the next round, the expected 7fa43565 value is 7FA43578 and only gets worse with every iteration.

This only happens when -O2 or greater is enabled. With no optimizations, or with -O1, the code works as expected.

  • 4
    TL;DR: undefined behaviour in your code. start by protecting your macros arguments by parentheses. when using i + 2 not sure it does what you want. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 8 at 18:44
  • 3
    @AnttiHaapala "macro argument parenthesized" would be better form, yet I think OP escaped that pitfall luckily here. Yet without [MCVE] OP is making this harder than it needs to be. – chux - Reinstate Monica Mar 8 at 19:07
  • 2
    you just have to read the comments properly to know what the issue is: don't declare your data as pointers on char. The compiler will assume that it can put them in unaligned memory locations. And please be nice. There's no elitism here. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 8 at 19:26
  • 2
    It does not appear "speck.h" is needed here. If it has something interesting, let us see it, else better to remove it. – chux - Reinstate Monica Mar 8 at 19:52
  • 2
    UB can occur from other un-posted code. We do not see how OP fed encrypt_block(out, in, key); nor reported its output. Hopefully the missing code is benign, yet it is remains unknown. – chux - Reinstate Monica Mar 8 at 20:04
4

It was a bug in the compiler.

I posted the question in the manufacturer's forum. Other people have indeed reproduced the issue, which happens when compiling for certain parts. Other parts are unaffected.

As a workaround, I changed the macros into real functions, and split the operation in two lines:

uint32_t ROL(uint32_t x, uint8_t r) {
    uint32_t intermedio;
    intermedio = x << r;
    intermedio |= x >> (32 - r);
    return intermedio;
}

This gives the correct result.

2

Posting compilable test code as a reference.

#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>
//#include "speck.h"

#define ROR(x, r) ((x >> r) | (x << (32 - r)))
#define ROL(x, r) ((x << r) | (x >> (32 - r)))
#define R(x, y, k) (x = ROR(x, 8), x += y, x ^= k, y = ROL(y, 3), y ^= x)
#define ROUNDS 27

void encrypt_block(uint32_t ct[2], uint32_t const pt[2], uint32_t const K[4]) {
  uint32_t x = pt[0], y = pt[1];
  uint32_t a = K[0], b = K[1], c = K[2], d = K[3];

  R(y, x, a);
  // for (int i = 0; i < ROUNDS - 3; i += 3) {
  for (uint32_t i = 0; i < ROUNDS - 3; i += 3) {
    R(b, a, i);
    R(y, x, a);
    R(c, a, i + 1);
    R(y, x, a);
    R(d, a, i + 2);
    R(y, x, a);
  }
  R(b, a, ROUNDS - 3);
  R(y, x, a);
  R(c, a, ROUNDS - 2);
  R(y, x, a);

  ct[0] = x;
  ct[1] = y;
}

int main(void) {
  uint32_t out[2];
  uint32_t in[] = {0x7475432d, 0x3b726574};
  uint32_t key[] = {0x03020100, 0x0b0a0908, 0x13121110, 0x1b1a1918};
  encrypt_block(out, in, key);

  printf("%8lx %8lx\n", (unsigned long) out[0], 0x454e028bLU);
  printf("%8lx %8lx\n", (unsigned long) out[1], 0x8c6fa548LU);
}

Output

454e028b 454e028b
8c6fa548 8c6fa548

Unexpected output

0x8FA3FED7
0x53D8CEA8
1

I don't see any indication of undefined behavior in your code, unless it's in some aspect of the setup/call point that you haven't shown. As such, it should be impossible for behavior to differ according to optimization level. Normally I would not be quick to blame compiler bugs for something like this, but forks of FOSS compilers for embedded stuff, and especially forks that redefine int to 16-bit in a compiler that wasn't designed to target 16-bit int, and especially proprietary forks where their code is so bad that they don't even want to let you see it, a compiler bug is very very likely.

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