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I read something I found contradictory with my current understanding of ports. If you google "how many ports does a server have", the first thing to come up states the following:

The server generally only ever uses one port, no matter how many clients are connected. It is the tuple of (client IP, client port, server IP, server port) that must be unique for each TCP connection - so the limit of 65535 ports is only relevant for how many connections a single client can make to a single server.

I thought each time a client establishes a connection to a server, then a socket is creating using a regular port for the connection between the two?

If no, does it mean that a server can have more clients connected to it, than the maximum amount of regular ports?

marked as duplicate by user207421 sockets Mar 10 at 0:06

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  • The problem is that the term "server" is ambiguous. It can refer to a physical machine and all its software or it can refer to just the specific service. So, for example, a "web server" could mean the box behind me or it could mean the web server service the box provides. If you ask me, "how much memory is the server using", the answer depends on which meaning of "server" you intend. Ditto for ports. – David Schwartz Mar 10 at 0:07
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    A web server may be listening on just port 80 but it can have hundreds of connection to it, all to port 80. Each connection has its own socket so that web server can read and write from the various connection, but they're all connections to port 80 on the web server. – David Schwartz Mar 10 at 0:09
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I thought each time a client establishes a connection to a server, then a socket is creating using a regular port for the connection between the two?

The term "port" in this context is being used to describe, essentially, an address. The port number, along with the IP address, uniquely identifies one endpoint of the network.

Not only does the server endpoint generally only use a single port number, it would be a lot more difficult to make connections to the server if it didn't, because what port number would the client endpoint use to request the connection? DNS allows a client to look up the IP address, if the IP address is not already know, but there's no such facility for port numbers. So the port number has to be known in advance.

So, no…it is not the case that each time a client makes a connection, a socket is created using a "regular port" for the connection between the two. There's no "regular port". There's just "port", all ports are the same, and they are simply a number that identifies the endpoint's address.

If no, does it mean that a server can have more clients connected to it, than the maximum amount of regular ports?

Yes, it can. On the server end, the port number is (generally) always the same. For example, an HTTP server will (generally) use port 80. The listening socket will have as its port number "80", as will the server-side socket for each connection.

The port number can be reused like this, because each socket has other identifying characteristics besides the IP address and port number. In particular, the server's listening socket is unique; there is only one socket on the server end that has that IP address, that port number, and which has no connections (i.e. is listening).

Once a connection is made, a new socket is created to represent that connection. And that socket can be uniquely identified, because unlike the listening socket, it does have a connection (i.e. a remote endpoint) associated with it, along with the IP address and port number. When the client endpoint sends data to the server, the network layer can tell which socket to which that should be delivered, because that data comes from a specific remote endpoint, which also has a unique IP address and port number.

The combination of the server's and client's unique IP addresses and port numbers uniquely identifies that connection, making it distinct from any other socket on the server that may have the same server-side endpoint's IP address and port number.

In the text you quoted, this part is describing exactly this distinct, unique identification of a socket:

It is the tuple of (client IP, client port, server IP, server port) that must be unique for each TCP connection

In this way, the server's IP address and port number can be used an indefinite number of times (not counting other constrained resources on the server, like memory and tables that hold the state of the network connections).

The limitation on port numbers only comes into play when trying to create additional listening sockets (for servers) or additional connections (for clients). Servers typically won't run out of port numbers unless they are implementing a protocol that requires the server to create a connection back to a client's listening socket (this is uncommon), and clients won't run out of port numbers unless they try to make a very large number of connections.

It is this latter limit that this part of the text you quoted is referring to:

the limit of 65535 ports is only relevant for how many connections a single client can make to a single server.

  • That was a brilliant answer, I hope for people to look at this, if they were in the same situation as me. – Jonas Grønbek Mar 10 at 0:15

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