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I have a webpage that displays a table of network bandwidth data like this. Note that I've only included a couple rows as examples but my table consists of hundreds of rows.

The column that contains the measure of bandwidth will display the value with one of three units: Kbps, Mbps, or Gbps. How can I configure jquery tablesorter to pay attention to the unit?

I already have Mottie's tablesorter running for this table, and the default behavior is to look at the integer and sort solely based off its value. Well, as you know, 9.46 Mbps is much larger than 901 Kbps, but tablesorter is only looking at the numeric value and is sorting the table so that 901 Kbps > 9.46 Mbps.

I've reviewed the custom parsers but honestly I don't know much JS so I'm having difficulty getting it to work.

My data table <table id="vlan-table"> is loaded via Jquery after the webpage is loaded, and then the vlan-table is reloaded every 60 seconds to grab the latest data (also via Jquery), so my tablesorter plugin is already more complicated than usual.

  <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.4/jquery.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="plugins/jquery.tablesorter.js"></script>

<!-- Load vlan-table on page load -->
  <script type="text/javascript">
    $(function ($) {
      $("#vlan-table").load("data/vlan-table.html", callback);
      function callback() {
        $("div#vlan-table table").tablesorter({
          sortList: [[0, 0]]
        });
      }
    });
  </script>

<!-- Reload vlan-table table every 60 seconds -->
  <script type="text/javascript">
    window.onload = setupRefresh;
    function setupRefresh() {
      setInterval("refreshBlock();", 60000);
    }
    function refreshBlock() {
      $('#vlan-table').load("data/vlan-table.html", callback);
      function callback() {
        $("div#vlan-table table").tablesorter({
          sortList: [[0, 0]]
        });
      }
    }
  </script>

I have tried to create a custom parser to replace each unit Kbps/Mbps/Gbps (and the space immediately before it) with a number that should allow for proper sorting, but I don't know where to put this custom parser:

$.tablesorter.addParser({
        id: 'data-rate-parser',
        is: function(s, table, cell, $cell){
          return false;
        },
        format: function(s, table, cell, cellIndex) {
          .replace(/ Kbps/,1000)
          .replace(/ Mbps/, 1000000)
          .replace(/ Gbps/, 1000000000)
        },
        type: 'numeric'
      });

I've tried placing it in its own <script></script> section of the page, and inside the callback() function with no luck.

Ideally, the best option would be to convert each measure of bandwidth back into 'bits per second' just for the sorting, but doing that in JS is beyond my skill level. Thanks!

1

Woohoo! I ended up figuring it out!

This answer to another question helped to show me where exactly the addParser part of the function goes.

Here is a working JS Fiddle. In case anything happens to JS Fiddle, I've put the JS code below.

$(document).ready(function() {

  $.tablesorter.addParser({
    id: 'bandwidth',
    is: function(s) {
      return false;
    },
    format: function(s) {
      return s.toLowerCase()
        .replace(/\.\d+ kbps/, 1000)
        .replace(/\.\d+ mbps/, 1000000)
        .replace(/\.\d+ gbps/, 1000000000)
    },
    type: 'numeric'
  });


  $("#vlan-table").tablesorter({
    sortInitialOrder: 'desc',
    sortRestart: true,
    headers: {
    1: {
    sorter: 'bandwidth'
    },
      2: {
        sorter: 'bandwidth'
      },
      4: {
        sorter: 'bandwidth',
        sortInitialOrder: 'asc'
      }
    }
  });
});

Problems in my original addParser function were:

  • Missing the return s()
  • Simply replacing the " Kbps" with a digit would not work, because the " Kbps" comes after the decimal point. I replaced the simple replace with a regex pattern that simply matches a literal period, one or more digits, and one of the units. So, the sorting function essentially replaces "123 Kbps" with "1231000", and replaces "313 Mbps" with "3131000000", allowing it to sort the table properly.
  • I did not specify which table columns I wanted to apply the custom parser to. Notice that the addParser contains an id: variable that I've assigned bandwidth, and in the .tablesorter function, the 'bandwidth' parser is applied to the columns by their index number (where the first column is index 0).

For my page that reloads the table very 60 seconds to display updated data, I simply put the .tablesorter and .tablesorter.addParser inside my callback() functions. Here is a question & answer that helped me understand how to use callback.

To anyone in the future that finds this helpful, feel free to drop a comment!

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