1

I'm switching from javascript classes to factory functions. Besides arguments, I need internal properties, eg. status in the below simplified example. So, why is status not set to OK and how should it be done?

const Model = (name) => {
    name = "myname";
    let status = "initial";

    const setOK = () => {
        status = "OK";
    }
    return {name, status, setOK}
};

const m = Model();
console.log(m.status); //status is initial
m.setOK();
console.log(m.status);  //expecting OK, but still initial
  • 1
    the status in the returned object gets its initial value from let status, but changing the value of let status doesn't change the object returned – Jaromanda X Mar 10 at 10:11
  • "... to not uses classes and use factory functions. I was just looking for the "best" way to get this done. " See my answer on object composition – zer00ne Mar 10 at 10:54
  • Thanks CertainPerformance and zer00ne, you both helped a lot and pointed me to the right direction. I’ll have to dive a bit more into it and play with these concepts first before the big refactor:-) – WU7 Mar 10 at 12:16
0

Object Composition

Use Object.assign() to merge objects or "inherit" methods without using class or prototype. Composition over inheritance


Demo

Details commented in demo

/* 
Object monitor has setOK() method. 
Note the parenthesis wrapped around the curly braces ensures
that the object literal will be invoked as a expression.
The props object from Model is passed to monitor object
*/
const monitor = props => ({
  setOK: () => {
    props.status = "OK";
  }
});

/* Factory Function 
Note the object literal props. props will be passed through
Object.assign() method in order to inherit the method setOK() from the monitor object.
*/
const Model = name => {
  let props = {
    name: name,
    status: "initial"
  };
  return Object.assign(props, monitor(props));
};

// Create object m with the name: "checkStatus"
const m = Model("checkStatus");
// Verify object m is named "checkStatus"
console.log('name: '+m.name);
// Check status
console.log('status: '+m.status);
// Invoke .setOK() method
m.setOK();
// Check status
console.log('status: '+m.status);

  • HI zer00ne, thanks for this. Seems a bit more flexible in terms of reusability. I think I need to let this sink in. Until now I've just used "plain" functions, In my real code I need a lot of other internal properties besides the status, so I'll have a look on how to get it done. – WU7 Mar 10 at 11:12
  • Hi @WU7 the first link is a very good article, it enlightened me -- I was using only functions as well (nothing wrong with that though). Once I got a grasp of object composition, I began to understand OOP concepts like classical inheritance and prototypes better as well. Happy coding. – zer00ne Mar 10 at 11:33
2

Currently, the object that is returned never changes: your

return {name, status, setOK}

returns an object with those three properties, with the values as they were when the object was returned. If you want the object to change, instead define the object beforehand inside of Model, and mutate said object inside of setOK:

const Model = (name) => {
  name = "myname";
  let status = "initial";
  const setOK = () => {
    obj.status = "OK";
  };
  const obj = { name, status, setOK };
  return obj;
};

const m = Model();
console.log(m.status);
m.setOK();
console.log(m.status);

  • Thanks for your help. So if I get this right, I need to build an object within my factory function and return this object. Is this the way factory functions are created using the => functions? – WU7 Mar 10 at 10:29
  • Not here - in this code, it doesn't make any difference to use an arrow function vs a standard function() {, because the calling context (this) is never checked or assigned to. – CertainPerformance Mar 10 at 10:30
  • I see. Before I start to refactor my code, is there any better way to do this? I mean future wise I've read, to not uses classes and use factory functions. I was just looking for the "best" way to get this done. – WU7 Mar 10 at 10:41
  • There's absolutely nothing wrong with classes - in fact, I would prefer them, if possible. They work just fine, and are often a bit easier to read: jsfiddle.net/7smhp9ru – CertainPerformance Mar 10 at 10:57
  • that's so true and I had my program working fine with classes for a small part I started to refactor... but then I read this link After which I started to read about factory functions... and then it got a bit more complex:-) – WU7 Mar 10 at 11:05

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