2

I have a function that fetches rows of a database asynchronously, and calls a callback function for each row. I am trying to write a wrapper which is a generator function which yields each time a row is returned, but I am not seeing how to properly yield.

The original code looks something like this:

db.each(query, (err, row) => {
  // do something here with row
}, () => {
  // called after the last row is returned
})

I'm familiar with how a generator works, but the yield seems to belong in the generator function itself, not in an anonymous function. So I think something like this wouldn't work:

function* dbEach(db, query) {
    db.each(query, (err, row) => {
      yield row
    })
}

When I actually try this I get an error "Unexpected identifier".

I looked a bit further and it appears that ES2018 now has asynchronous iterators which are supposed to make this possible. However, I'm having trouble wrapping my head around how exactly I can use async iterators in the case where I already have a callback which is getting called multiple times.

  • 2
    You're yielding from an inner, non-generator, function. – SLaks Mar 10 at 21:38
  • Not sure if this is what you need here, function* dbEach(db, query) { yield db.each(query, (err, row) => row); } – Rikin Mar 10 at 21:40
  • @Rikin oh... maybe yield*? – Michael Mar 10 at 21:43
  • How can you tell when all .each callbacks have finished? Is there a .finished property, or something like that you can check? (Maybe there's a better function than each from which you can get all rows as an array, that would make things far easier) – CertainPerformance Mar 10 at 21:43
  • @CertainPerformance There is another optional callback for that. – Michael Mar 10 at 21:44
3

You can make the generator async, then await a Promise that resolves with all rows (so that you have reference to a rows variable on the top level of dbEach), and then you can yield each row in that rows array:

async function* dbEach(db, query) {
  const rows = await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    const rows = [];
    db.each(query, (err, row) => {
      if (err) reject(err);
      else rows.push(row);
    }, () => resolve(rows));
  });
  for (const row of rows) {
    yield row;
  }
}

Use with:

for await (const row of dbEach(...)) {
  // do something
}

It looks like .each is designed for running a callback on each row, which isn't exactly optimal for what you're trying to accomplish here with a generator - if possible, it would be great if there was a method in your database that allows you to get an array of rows instead, for example:

async function* dbEach(db, query) {
  const rows = await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    db.getAllRows(query, (err, rows) => {
      if (err) reject(err);
      else resolve(rows);
    });
  });
  for (const row of rows) {
    yield row;
  }
}

Though, I don't think that a generator helps a lot here - you may as well just await a Promise that resolves to the rows, and iterate over the rows synchronously:

function getRows(db, query) {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    db.getAllRows(query, (err, rows) => {
      if (err) reject(err);
      else resolve(rows);
    });
  });
}

const rows = await getRows(...);
for (const row of rows) {
  // ...
}
  • 1
    The problem with getting an array of rows is that there could be (for instance) 50 million rows buffered up in memory... – Michael Mar 10 at 21:59
  • 1
    Given that the callback is called by the db's internals, and that said call isn't controllable / throttleable from the outside, I'm somewhat doubtful that a generator would be able to interface with that without having many rows possibly "pile up". Eg, what if the callback is called 1000 times before the generator consumer has had the spare resources to do its operation? – CertainPerformance Mar 10 at 22:31
  • How does await work without being inside the body of async? – zer00ne Mar 23 at 2:22
  • 1
    @zer00ne OP is looking to use the new asynchronous iteration syntax, which of course requires its await to be inside an async function, but the problem OP was running into was figuring out how to set up the generator, not with how to use await. The containing block would have to be an async function, of course – CertainPerformance Mar 23 at 9:26

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