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I am writing a service that tells multiple classes implementing the interface IDeviceFinder to go look for connected devices, which the service will put in a cache for other objects to use.

The controller script looks as follows:

private Container _container;

public bool Start()
{
    _container.Collection.Register<IDeviceFinder>(
        new Assembly[] { Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly() });

    _container.Register<IDeviceCache, DeviceCache>(Lifestyle.Singleton);
    _container.Register<IDeviceService, DeviceService>();

    _container.Verify();
}

Using Simple Injector, the device finders are passed to the DeviceService in the constructor. When the finders find a device they report it back to the service via a delegate. The service then proceeds to put it into the device cache (a singleton).

The device service itself implements the interface IDisposable. Using Dispose the service unsubscribes from the delegates of the device finders.

public class DeviceService : IDeviceService //IDeviceService inherits from IDisposable
{
    private IDeviceCache _cache;
    private List<IDeviceFinder> _finders = new List<IDeviceFinder>();

    public DeviceService(IDeviceCache cache, IDeviceFinder[] finders)
    {
        this._cache = cache;
        this._finders = finders.ToList();

        foreach (var finder in this._finders)
        {
            finder.DeviceFound += AddDeviceToCache;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        foreach (var finder in this._finders)
        {
            finder.DeviceFound -= AddDeviceToCache;
        }
    }

    private void AddDeviceToCache(Device device)
    {
        //...
    }
}

However, Simple Injector gives me a warning that the transient DeviceService cannot implement IDisposable.

When I change the lifestyle to be scoped, I get a warning that there is a lifestyle mismatch, because DeviceService (async scoped) depends on IDeviceFinder[] (transient).

How would I fix this error? I don't really want to get rid of the IDisposable interface.

  • 4
    During construction, your DeviceService initializes its finders, which is, from DI perspective, not the best solution, as injection constructors can best be left free of any logic other than storing dependencies. I would, therefore, turn the design around. Instead of using a callback from finder to device service, inject a service into finder that allows every finder to notify about the found device. This keeps the finder abstractions free of state and might even prevent device service from knowing about the finders. – Steven Mar 11 at 9:46
  • @Liam I don't want the DeviceService to be Singleton, hence why I decoupled the cache from it in the first place. Both the service and its finders are supposed to be transient. I also don't really understand why the Dispose would be amiss in this case. – L. Kneringer Mar 11 at 10:33
  • @Steven That's an interesting concept, but the service is also telling the finders when they should go looking for devices. As I understand it, the service would still need to know about the finders, and as such, the finders would also need to tell it if they were disposed. Please correct me if I'm wrong. – L. Kneringer Mar 11 at 10:36
  • Hi @L.Kneringer, can you provide more context by updating your code samples in such way that you visualize the interaction between DeviceService, IDeviceFinder and IDeviceCache? – Steven Mar 11 at 11:08
  • @Steven The service instructs the finders to go look for devices, and the finders report back to the service when they find something. The service then proceeds to make some changes to the discovered device and put it into the DeviceCache, for other classes to use. I have fixed the issue with the dispose meanwhile by simply getting rid of it, and only subscribing to the delegates once the service actually tells the finders to do a search and when listening to the delegate becomes necessary, unsubscribing afterwards. I believe this solution works best. Thank you for all the ideas. – L. Kneringer Mar 11 at 11:32

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