3

According to my understanding, a derived class is able to convert a derived class pointer to the base class pointer even though there is protected inheritance.

Why is this code wrong under the vs2017, generating a compiler error?

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class base {
public:
    virtual void f() { cout << "base"; }
};

class deri : protected base {
public:
    void f() override { cout << "derived"; }
    void test(base* bp) { bp->f(); }  
};



int main()
{
    deri d, d2;
    d.test(&d);   //error,conversion to inaccessible base class "base" is not allowed
}

I rewrite the code like this and it compiles successfully:

class deri : protected base {
public:
    void f() override { cout << "derived"; }
    void test(deri* dp) { base*bp=dp;bp->f(); }  
};


int main()
{
    deri d, d2;
    d.test(&d);   //it's Ok,and prints derived.
}

In my opinion,these two codes just do the same thing,convert a deri pointer to a base pointer,and I'm comfused.Can anyone tell me the difference between these two codes?

  • You have used protected inheritance. Lets start with why did you do that? What do you think this gains for you? – Fantastic Mr Fox Mar 11 at 13:14
  • @FantasticMrFox this is just a test,protected inheritance maybe doesn't make much sense, but it's the same result with private inheritance as the default inheritance for the class. – shuang liang Mar 11 at 13:28
7

In my opinion,these two codes just do the same thing,convert a deri pointer to a base pointer

But they don't do it at the same place. In the first version, it is the scope of main where the conversion must happen. But main cannot access base in order to do the conversion, for main is completely outside the scope of deri, where such a conversion is allowed.

And that's what access control is about, for a class to tell at which scope is the name of its member (or base) is accessible. Even if your two pieces of code (assuming we ignore the fact one doesn't even compile) would result in the exact same thing happening, there are still rules in place for encapsulation that the compiler must abide by.

So you can either make that base public, or work with the limitations of protected accessibility. As an aside though, protected bases are very rarely seen in the wild. I suggest you ponder whether or not you even need it.

  • Maybe also add that protected inheritance is very rarely the correct type of inheritance to use. I doubt it is correct in this example ... – Fantastic Mr Fox Mar 11 at 13:15
  • thanks your anwser, I already understand it. In the fact, I write deri with class default inheritance method (private inheritance) at the beginning,then I change to the protected just out of curiosity. – shuang liang Mar 11 at 13:38
  • Not that clear for me. in the first example f() is public in Base inherited as private and overridden as public how the conversion is inaccessible? – Soulimane Mammar Mar 11 at 15:59
  • @SoulimaneMammar - The conversion is on the argument of test. In the first example it necessitates deri* -> base* in the scope of main. – StoryTeller Mar 11 at 16:00
  • Still not clear. why base is inaccessible ?* – Soulimane Mammar Mar 11 at 16:19
0

IMHO Let's assume the compiler authorizes the conversion from deri* to base*, the newly obtained pointer will be useless in the scope of main!! why? here is why:

the class deri: protected base statement means that:

  1. private members in base are not accessible in deri
  2. protected members in base will be protected in deri
  3. public members in base will be protected in deri

So in main scope the supposedly converted pointer will have no access to the base part of d so why do the conversion in the first place (and this why the compiler doesn't accept these kind of conversions)

In the second example there is no conversion taking place in the main scope and in the definition of the test member function the conversion is possible. Why? for the same reasons as before (the converted variable bp is defined inside the deri scope and hence has access to the public and protected base part members of the object pointed by dp

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