-3

hello am trying to read a file with the code i wrote

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    int task_id=0;
    FILE *fp;
    fp = fopen("output","r");
    if (fp == NULL)
    {   
        printf("failed opening file");
        return 1;
    }
    else{
    fscanf(fp,"conhost.exe                   %d",&task_id);
    fclose(fp);
    printf("taskID is: %d",task_id);
    return 0;
    }
}

content of file for reference

conhost.exe                   4272 Console                    2     13,504 K

and i keep getting the output as 0

  • 3
    What does fscanf return? – Roland Illig Mar 11 '19 at 18:47
  • 1
    What happens if you check the return value from fscanf? I bet it returns 0 and you haven't read any values. – bruceg Mar 11 '19 at 18:48
  • 1
    are you sure your output file contains exactly conhost.exe ...SPACES... NUMBER? – alinsoar Mar 11 '19 at 18:50
  • 4
    @TimRandall I believe a single space in format string should consume them all. – Eugene Sh. Mar 11 '19 at 18:51
  • 5
    Can't reproduce, but a better way to skip the first part would be with int res = fscanf(fp,"%*s%d", &task_id); which scans a string until the first whitespace but does not store it, and then reads the int. – Weather Vane Mar 11 '19 at 18:52
0

Assuming you want to get the '2' from your sample output file, you could do it like this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int task_id = 0;
    FILE *fp;
    fp = fopen("output", "r");
    if (fp == NULL) {   
        printf("failed opening file\n");
        return 1;
    }
    else {
        fscanf(fp, "%*s%*d%*s%d", &task_id);
        printf("taskID is: %d\n", task_id);
    }   // Code
    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}

Note that fscanf() lets you discard data by adding an asterisk between the format specifier and the percent sign - so you can amend this statement fscanf(fp, "%*s%*d%*s%d", &task_id); to collect the required data.

3

Well you have a good answer by Mr. Cara (who I commend for using the assignment suppression operator), but I would add one more suggestion. Any time you are reading lines on input -- use a line-oriented input function like fgets that will help you avoid a whole host of pitfall with the scanf family of functions. You can then use sscanf to parse the wanted information from the buffer holding the line of data. This ensures what remains in you input stream doesn't depend on the format-specifier used.

Also, don't hardcode filenames -- that is what program arguments are for. A short example would be:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXC 1024u  /* if you need a constant, #define one (or more) */

int main (int argc, char **argv) {  /* don't hardcode name, use arguments */

    int task_id = 0;
    char buf[MAXC];
    /* use filename provided as 1st argument (stdin by default) */
    FILE *fp = argc > 1 ? fopen (argv[1], "r") : stdin;

    if (!fp) {  /* validate file open for reading */
        perror ("file open failed");
        return 1;
    }

    if (!fgets (buf, MAXC, fp)) {   /* read with line-oriented function */
        fputs ("error: EOF encountered on file read.\n", stderr);
        return 1;
    }
    if (fp != stdin) fclose (fp);   /* close file if not stdin */

    /* parse information with sscanf (read/discard initial string) */
    if (sscanf (buf, "%*s %d", &task_id) != 1) {
        fputs ("error: invalid file format.\n", stderr);
        return 1;
    }
    printf("taskID is: %d\n",task_id);  /* output task_id */
}

Example Use/Output

$ ./bin/rd_task_id <output
taskID is: 4272

Look things over and let me know if you have questions.

  • A more complete answer - upvoted – csknk Mar 12 '19 at 9:09

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