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In a for loop, what is the difference between looping with pairs() and ipairs()? This page uses both: Lua Docs

With ipairs():

a = {"one", "two", "three"}
for i, v in ipairs(a) do
  print(i, v)
end

Result:

1   one
2   two
3   three

With pairs():

a = {"one", "two", "three"}
for i, v in pairs(a) do
  print(i, v)
end

Result:

1   one
2   two
3   three

You can test it here: Lua Demo

0
99

pairs() and ipairs() are slightly different.

  • pairs() returns key-value pairs and is mostly used for associative tables. key order is unspecified.
  • ipairs() returns index-value pairs and is mostly used for numeric tables. Non numeric keys in an array are ignored, while the index order is deterministic (in numeric order).

This is illustrated by the following code fragment.

> u={}
> u[1]="a"
> u[3]="b"
> u[2]="c"
> u[4]="d"
> u["hello"]="world"
> for key,value in ipairs(u) do print(key,value) end
1   a
2   c
3   b
4   d
> for key,value in pairs(u) do print(key,value) end
1   a
hello   world
3   b
2   c
4   d
> 

When you create an tables without keys (as in your question), it behaves as a numeric array and behaviour or pairs and ipairs is identical.

a = {"one", "two", "three"}

is equivalent to a[1]="one" a[2]="two" a[3]="three" and pairs() and ipairs() will be identical (except for the ordering that is not guaranteed in pairs()).

5
  • I believe that the ordering is guaranteed with pairs(), and it will go up through the numeric indexes and then will go to the other non numeric values in a random order.
    – user11071538
    Mar 12 '19 at 10:39
  • 2
    @BeastCoder2: At lua.org/manual/5.3/manual.html#pdf-next, it says "The order in which the indices are enumerated is not specified, even for numeric indices." What you describe might be common behavior in Lua, but it could change in any bugfix release.
    – luther
    Mar 12 '19 at 17:19
  • @luther Thank you for clearing that up! It may just have been what I was using to run the code.
    – user11071538
    Mar 12 '19 at 19:03
  • I've also seen pairs iterating over consecutive integer indices beginning at 1 (and sometimes over non-consecutive integer indices) in order, but it's not guaranteed. Mar 12 '19 at 21:17
  • 14
    Another important point about ipairs is that it only loops over the first sequence of indices, starting at 1: it stops at the first gap. Consider for i,v in ipairs({[1]='a', [2]='b', [4]='d'}) do print(i,v) end and for i,v in ipairs({[2]='a', [3]='b', [4]='d'}) do print(i,v) end Mar 13 '19 at 14:21
3

There is no array-type in Lua, only tables which might have consecutive elements starting from index 1.

The generic for-loop, in contrast to the numeric for-loop, expects three values:

  1. A callable
  2. A context-value it passes on
  3. An initial index-value

It calls the callable with context-value and index-value, storing all the returned values in the provided new variables. The first one is additionally saved as the new index-value.

Now some representative examples of callables for the loop:

  1. ipairs(t) returns a function, the table t, and the starting-point 0.
    The function is the moral equivalent to:

    function ipairs_next(t, i)
        i = i + 1
        var v = t[i]
        if v ~= nil then
            return i, v
        end
    end
    

    Thus, all numeric entries starting at 1 until the first missing one are shown.

  2. pairs(t) either delegates to t's metatable, specifically to __pairs(t), or returns the function next, the table t, and the starting-point nil. next accepts a table and an index, and returns the next index and the associated value, if it exists.

    Thus, all elements are shown in some arbitrary order.

  3. There are no limits to how creative one can be with the function, and that is what vanilla Lua expects.
    See "Bizzare "attempt to call a table value" in Lua" for an example of a user-written callable, and how some dialects react if the first value is not actually a callable.

2
  • I’m new to the language and was wondering what each one is, what is each type of for loop? What is the callable, context-value, and index-value? What is ipairs_next, a function you made?
    – user11071538
    Mar 11 '19 at 19:53
  • i am new to lua too but i think that it is an iterator function, lookup "iterators in programming"
    – Karambit
    Jan 21 at 19:12

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