62

How are you handling the entry of numeric values in WPF applications?

Without a NumericUpDown control, I've been using a TextBox and handling its PreviewKeyDown event with the code below, but it's pretty ugly.

Has anyone found a more graceful way to get numeric data from the user without relying on a third-party control?

private void NumericEditPreviewKeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    bool isNumPadNumeric = (e.Key >= Key.NumPad0 && e.Key <= Key.NumPad9) || e.Key == Key.Decimal;
    bool isNumeric = (e.Key >= Key.D0 && e.Key <= Key.D9) || e.Key == Key.OemPeriod;

    if ((isNumeric || isNumPadNumeric) && Keyboard.Modifiers != ModifierKeys.None)
    {
        e.Handled = true;
        return;
    }

    bool isControl = ((Keyboard.Modifiers != ModifierKeys.None && Keyboard.Modifiers != ModifierKeys.Shift)
        || e.Key == Key.Back || e.Key == Key.Delete || e.Key == Key.Insert
        || e.Key == Key.Down || e.Key == Key.Left || e.Key == Key.Right || e.Key == Key.Up
        || e.Key == Key.Tab
        || e.Key == Key.PageDown || e.Key == Key.PageUp
        || e.Key == Key.Enter || e.Key == Key.Return || e.Key == Key.Escape
        || e.Key == Key.Home || e.Key == Key.End);

    e.Handled = !isControl && !isNumeric && !isNumPadNumeric;
}

17 Answers 17

55

How about:

protected override void OnPreviewTextInput(System.Windows.Input.TextCompositionEventArgs e)
{
    e.Handled = !AreAllValidNumericChars(e.Text);
    base.OnPreviewTextInput(e);
}

private bool AreAllValidNumericChars(string str)
{
    foreach(char c in str)
    {
        if(!Char.IsNumber(c)) return false;
    }

    return true;
}
  • 4
    I just realised that neither approach will prevent the user from pasting non-numeric characters into the control, but that's not a huge issue right now. I'll mark your response as the answer 'coz it's as close as we can get, I think. Thanks! – Matt Hamilton Apr 2 '09 at 0:00
  • 8
    This will fail on decimals. If the user enters 5.3. It will also fail on negative numbers because "-" is not a number. Easy to fix but just thought I would throw that caution in there. – Kelly Mar 18 '10 at 14:56
  • 5
    e.Handled = !e.Text.ToCharArray().All(c => Char.IsNumber(c)); – si618 Jul 26 '10 at 5:19
  • 6
    Why not Double.TryParse ? – Louis Rhys Jun 29 '11 at 10:26
  • 3
    e.Handled = !e.Text.All(Char.IsNumber); – Olson.dev Dec 6 '11 at 20:49
13

This is how I do it. It uses a regular expression to check if the text that will be in the box is numeric or not.

Regex NumEx = new Regex(@"^-?\d*\.?\d*$");

private void TextBox_PreviewTextInput(object sender, TextCompositionEventArgs e)
{
    if (sender is TextBox)
    {
        string text = (sender as TextBox).Text + e.Text;
        e.Handled = !NumEx.IsMatch(text);
    }
    else
        throw new NotImplementedException("TextBox_PreviewTextInput Can only Handle TextBoxes");
}

There is now a much better way to do this in WPF and Silverlight. If your control is bound to a property, all you have to do is change your binding statement a bit. Use the following for your binding:

<TextBox Text="{Binding Number, Mode=TwoWay, NotifyOnValidationError=True, ValidatesOnExceptions=True}"/>

Note that you can use this on custom properties too, all you have to do is throw an exception if the value in the box is invalid and the control will get highlighted with a red border. If you click on the upper right of the red border then the exception message will pop up.

  • 2
    +1 for calling out the binding method. – Justin R. Jun 11 '10 at 22:27
  • 2
    I like the Regex solution. But the problem here is that I cannot add a minus to an existing number, because it assumes the new text is always appended to the old text. Any suggestion? – newman Jan 2 '11 at 19:50
  • the Regex solution is not nearly as good as the BindingValidation method. – Eric Jan 28 '11 at 21:49
10

I've been using an attached property to allow the user to use the up and down keys to change the values in the text box. To use it, you just use

<TextBox local:TextBoxNumbers.SingleDelta="1">100</TextBox>

This doesn't actually address the validation issues that are referred to in this question, but it addresses what I do about not having a numeric up/down control. Using it for a little bit, I think I might actually like it better than the old numeric up/down control.

The code isn't perfect, but it handles the cases I needed it to handle:

  • Up arrow, Down arrow
  • Shift + Up arrow, Shift + Down arrow
  • Page Up, Page Down
  • Binding Converter on the text property

Code behind

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows.Input;

namespace Helpers
{
    public class TextBoxNumbers
    {    
        public static Decimal GetSingleDelta(DependencyObject obj)
        {
            return (Decimal)obj.GetValue(SingleDeltaProperty);
        }

        public static void SetSingleDelta(DependencyObject obj, Decimal value)
        {
            obj.SetValue(SingleDeltaProperty, value);
        }

        // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for SingleValue.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
        public static readonly DependencyProperty SingleDeltaProperty =
            DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("SingleDelta", typeof(Decimal), typeof(TextBoxNumbers), new UIPropertyMetadata(0.0m, new PropertyChangedCallback(f)));

        public static void f(DependencyObject o, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            TextBox t = o as TextBox;

            if (t == null)
                return;

            t.PreviewKeyDown += new System.Windows.Input.KeyEventHandler(t_PreviewKeyDown);
        }

        private static Decimal GetSingleValue(DependencyObject obj)
        {
            return GetSingleDelta(obj);
        }

        private static Decimal GetDoubleValue(DependencyObject obj)
        {
            return GetSingleValue(obj) * 10;
        }

        private static Decimal GetTripleValue(DependencyObject obj)
        {
            return GetSingleValue(obj) * 100;
        }

        static void t_PreviewKeyDown(object sender, System.Windows.Input.KeyEventArgs e)
        {
            TextBox t = sender as TextBox;
            Decimal i;

            if (t == null)
                return;

            if (!Decimal.TryParse(t.Text, out i))
                return;

            switch (e.Key)
            {
                case System.Windows.Input.Key.Up:
                    if (Keyboard.Modifiers == ModifierKeys.Shift)
                        i += GetDoubleValue(t);
                    else
                        i += GetSingleValue(t);
                    break;

                case System.Windows.Input.Key.Down:
                    if (Keyboard.Modifiers == ModifierKeys.Shift)
                        i -= GetDoubleValue(t);
                    else
                        i -= GetSingleValue(t);
                    break;

                case System.Windows.Input.Key.PageUp:
                    i += GetTripleValue(t);
                    break;

                case System.Windows.Input.Key.PageDown:
                    i -= GetTripleValue(t);
                    break;

                default:
                    return;
            }

            if (BindingOperations.IsDataBound(t, TextBox.TextProperty))
            {
                try
                {
                    Binding binding = BindingOperations.GetBinding(t, TextBox.TextProperty);
                    t.Text = (string)binding.Converter.Convert(i, null, binding.ConverterParameter, binding.ConverterCulture);
                }
                catch
                {
                    t.Text = i.ToString();
                }
            }
            else
                t.Text = i.ToString();
        }
    }
}
  • That's a great piece of code. The various NUD controls I've tried have always been buggy. Yours works like charm, thanks. :) – Echilon Jan 11 '10 at 14:17
  • And it fits with MVVM. +1 – Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 6 '12 at 10:23
10

I decided to simplify the reply marked as the answer on here to basically 2 lines using a LINQ expression.

e.Handled = !e.Text.All(Char.IsNumber);
base.OnPreviewTextInput(e);
  • 1
    This is nice and neat. But how do I make it accept "." and "-"? – newman Jan 2 '11 at 19:53
  • 1
    e.Text.All(cc => Char.IsNumber(cc) || cc == '.' || cc == '-') ? – user7116 Feb 3 '11 at 18:00
  • Unfortunately, OnPreviewTextInput does not get called when the user inputs a whitespace. This could be separately handled by also overriding OnPreviewKeyDown, anyway the user would still be able to paste non-numeric characters. PS.: you could improve your answer by writing the full method: protected override void OnPreviewTextInput(TextCompositionEventArgs e) { ... } – Gobe Feb 8 '16 at 20:26
3

I use a custom ValidationRule to check if text is numeric.

public class DoubleValidation : ValidationRule
{
    public override ValidationResult Validate(object value, System.Globalization.CultureInfo cultureInfo)
    {
        if (value is string)
        {
            double number;
            if (!Double.TryParse((value as string), out number))
                return new ValidationResult(false, "Please enter a valid number");
        }

        return ValidationResult.ValidResult;
    }

Then when I bind a TextBox to a numeric property, I add the new custom class to the Binding.ValidationRules collection. In the example below the validation rule is checked everytime the TextBox.Text changes.

<TextBox>
    <TextBox.Text>
        <Binding Path="MyNumericProperty" UpdateSourceTrigger="PropertyChanged">
            <Binding.ValidationRules>
                <local:DoubleValidation/>
            </Binding.ValidationRules>
        </Binding>
    </TextBox.Text>
</TextBox>
2

Why don't you just try using the KeyDown event rather than the PreviewKeyDown Event. You can stop the invalid characters there, but all the control characters are accepted. This seems to work for me:

private void NumericKeyDown(object sender, System.Windows.Input.KeyEventArgs e)
{
    bool isNumPadNumeric = (e.Key >= Key.NumPad0 && e.Key <= Key.NumPad9);
    bool isNumeric =((e.Key >= Key.D0 && e.Key <= Key.D9) && (e.KeyboardDevice.Modifiers == ModifierKeys.None));
    bool isDecimal = ((e.Key == Key.OemPeriod || e.Key == Key.Decimal) && (((TextBox)sender).Text.IndexOf('.') < 0));
    e.Handled = !(isNumPadNumeric || isNumeric || isDecimal);
}
2
public class NumericTextBox : TextBox
{
    public NumericTextBox()
        : base()
    {
        DataObject.AddPastingHandler(this, new DataObjectPastingEventHandler(CheckPasteFormat));
    }

    private Boolean CheckFormat(string text)
    {
        short val;
        return Int16.TryParse(text, out val);
    }

    private void CheckPasteFormat(object sender, DataObjectPastingEventArgs e)
    {
        var isText = e.SourceDataObject.GetDataPresent(System.Windows.DataFormats.Text, true);

        if (isText)
        {
            var text = e.SourceDataObject.GetData(DataFormats.Text) as string;
            if (CheckFormat(text))
            {
                return;
            }
        }

        e.CancelCommand();
    }

    protected override void OnPreviewTextInput(System.Windows.Input.TextCompositionEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!CheckFormat(e.Text))
        {
            e.Handled = true;
        }
        else
        {
            base.OnPreviewTextInput(e);
        }
    }
}

Additionally you may customize the parsing behavior by providing appropriate dependency properties.

  • 1
    This won't work because e.Text contains only the added text, not the entire TextBox contents. The value could just be ".". – Greg Sansom Jan 19 '11 at 1:41
  • Works perfectly for me – user755404 Nov 30 '12 at 16:32
2

Combining the ideas from a few of these answers, I have created a NumericTextBox that

  • Handles decimals
  • Does some basic validation to ensure any entered '-' or '.' is valid
  • Handles pasted values

Please feel free to update if you can think of any other logic that should be included.

public class NumericTextBox : TextBox
{
    public NumericTextBox()
    {
        DataObject.AddPastingHandler(this, OnPaste);
    }

    private void OnPaste(object sender, DataObjectPastingEventArgs dataObjectPastingEventArgs)
    {
        var isText = dataObjectPastingEventArgs.SourceDataObject.GetDataPresent(System.Windows.DataFormats.Text, true);

        if (isText)
        {
            var text = dataObjectPastingEventArgs.SourceDataObject.GetData(DataFormats.Text) as string;
            if (IsTextValid(text))
            {
                return;
            }
        }

        dataObjectPastingEventArgs.CancelCommand();
    }

    private bool IsTextValid(string enteredText)
    {
        if (!enteredText.All(c => Char.IsNumber(c) || c == '.' || c == '-'))
        {
            return false;
        }

        //We only validation against unselected text since the selected text will be replaced by the entered text
        var unselectedText = this.Text.Remove(SelectionStart, SelectionLength);

        if (enteredText == "." && unselectedText.Contains("."))
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (enteredText == "-" && unselectedText.Length > 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    protected override void OnPreviewTextInput(System.Windows.Input.TextCompositionEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Handled = !IsTextValid(e.Text);
        base.OnPreviewTextInput(e);
    }
}
1

You can also try using data validation if users commit data before you use it. Doing that I found was fairly simple and cleaner than fiddling about with keys.

Otherwise, you could always disable Paste too!

  • Yeah I'll definitely be validating anyway. I just like to prevent the user from being able to make mistakes as much as possible, so that there's next to no chance that they'll see an error popup. – Matt Hamilton Apr 2 '09 at 0:01
1

My Version of Arcturus answer, can change the convert method used to work with int / uint / decimal / byte (for colours) or any other numeric format you care to use, also works with copy / paste

protected override void OnPreviewTextInput( System.Windows.Input.TextCompositionEventArgs e )
{
    try
    {
        if ( String.IsNullOrEmpty( SelectedText ) )
        {
            Convert.ToDecimal( this.Text.Insert( this.CaretIndex, e.Text ) );
        }
        else
        {
            Convert.ToDecimal( this.Text.Remove( this.SelectionStart, this.SelectionLength ).Insert( this.SelectionStart, e.Text ) );
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        // mark as handled if cannot convert string to decimal
        e.Handled = true;
    }

    base.OnPreviewTextInput( e );
}

N.B. Untested code.

  • doesn't work with copy / paste – Kluyg Aug 8 '12 at 7:28
1

Add this to the main solution to make sure the the binding is updated to zero when the textbox is cleared.

protected override void OnPreviewKeyUp(System.Windows.Input.KeyEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnPreviewKeyUp(e);

    if (BindingOperations.IsDataBound(this, TextBox.TextProperty))
    {
        if (this.Text.Length == 0)
        {
            this.SetValue(TextBox.TextProperty, "0");
            this.SelectAll();
        }
    }
}
  • Interesting. Does it need to be wrapped in an IsDataBound call? – Matt Hamilton May 4 '10 at 10:48
0

Call me crazy, but why not put plus and minus buttons at either side of the TextBox control and simply prevent the TextBox from receiving cursor focus, thereby creating your own cheap NumericUpDown control?

  • 5
    You are crazy. :) – F.D.Castel Nov 10 '08 at 21:10
  • 1
    Speed of data entry. We have data entry operators who hammer data in using the keyboard (and often just the numeric keypad) so it's impractical for them to reach for the mouse half way through an entry screen. – Matt Hamilton Apr 1 '09 at 23:59
  • In that case, write your own re-usable NUD control and use it throughout your app! – RQDQ Oct 15 '10 at 20:33
  • 2
    How long would it take to enter a 4 digit pin? Or transfer a large amount between accounts? Or add two large numbers? Or set the port number to 8080? Bad. – Greg Sansom Jan 19 '11 at 1:54
  • 2
    I can't believe I'm defending this response over 2 years on, but speed of entry has nothing to do with it - the original poster wanted a NumericUpDown TextBox and this would work for that scenario. He said nothing about speed. If you wanted 8080, you'd just hit tab and type 8080 on the keyboard; not really a big deal. I worry for the brain of anyone who really thinks I was saying that clicking the plus button thousands of times was a good solution. – tags2k Jan 20 '11 at 16:11
0
private void txtNumericValue_PreviewKeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    KeyConverter converter = new KeyConverter();

    string key = converter.ConvertToString(e.Key);

    if (key != null && key.Length == 1)
    {
        e.Handled = Char.IsDigit(key[0]) == false;
    }
}

This is the easiest technique I've found to accomplish this. The down side is that the context menu of the TextBox still allows non-numerics via Paste. To resolve this quickly I simply added the attribute/property: ContextMenu="{x:Null}" to the TextBox thereby disabling it. Not ideal but for my scenario it will suffice.

Obviously you could add a few more keys/chars in the test to include additional acceptable values (e.g. '.', '$' etc...)

  • Sadly, my solution has holes since the Oem characters are not converted to strings with single characters (e.g. '.' = OemPeriod). – Audaxis Feb 19 '09 at 14:48
0
Private Sub Value1TextBox_PreviewTextInput(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As TextCompositionEventArgs) Handles Value1TextBox.PreviewTextInput
    Try
        If Not IsNumeric(e.Text) Then
            e.Handled = True
        End If
    Catch ex As Exception
    End Try
End Sub

Worked for me.

  • ... as long as the user doesn't enter a - or . – Greg Sansom Jan 19 '11 at 1:50
0

Can you not just use something like the following?

int numericValue = 0;

if (false == int.TryParse(yourInput, out numericValue))
{
    // handle non-numeric input
}
0
void PreviewTextInputHandler(object sender, TextCompositionEventArgs e)
{
    string sVal = e.Text;
    int val = 0;

    if (sVal != null && sVal.Length > 0)
    {
        if (int.TryParse(sVal, out val))
        {
            e.Handled = false;
        }
        else
        {
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    This won't work because e.Text contains only the added text, not the entire TextBox contents. The value could just be "." – Greg Sansom Jan 19 '11 at 1:54
0

Can also use a converter like:

public class IntegerFormatConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, System.Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        int result;
        int.TryParse(value.ToString(), out result);
        return result;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, System.Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        int result;
        int.TryParse(value.ToString(), out result);
        return result;
    }
}
  • 1
    Don't need a converter - WPF will do the conversion by default. My question was more about ensuring that the user never sees an error because they've entered a non-numeric value. A converter doesn't stop them from doing that. – Matt Hamilton Aug 8 '12 at 5:46

protected by Community Nov 6 '12 at 10:25

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