234

How can I calculate yesterday as a date in JavaScript?

15 Answers 15

382
var date = new Date();

date ; //# => Fri Apr 01 2011 11:14:50 GMT+0200 (CEST)

date.setDate(date.getDate() - 1);

date ; //# => Thu Mar 31 2011 11:14:50 GMT+0200 (CEST)
  • 7
    Nice. At first glance, it might seem that this would fail as getDate returns the day of the month (eg: 1 - 31) but actually setDate(0) sets the date to the last day of the previous month. Does this work across all browsers though? – Drew Noakes Mar 21 '14 at 14:19
  • Couldn't verify "all" browsers but worked in all I tested camo.githubusercontent.com/… – James Kyburz Mar 24 '14 at 20:57
  • 1
    @Zargold Don't understand what you mean. node --version v9.4.0 node const date = new Date() undefined > date.toISOString() '2018-02-10T16:26:30.821Z' > date.setDate(date.getDate() - 1) 1518193590821 > date.toISOString() '2018-02-09T16:26:30.821Z' – James Kyburz Feb 10 '18 at 16:28
  • Hmm yes just tested it out directly and you're right, not sure how my use case was different and have since completely refactored away from it. So I won't be able to see. – Zargold Feb 11 '18 at 18:10
79

Not very efficient, but as oneliner:

var yesterday = new Date(new Date().setDate(new Date().getDate()-1));

The above creates three Date objects which is needlessly wasteful. This can be reduced to a single instantiation with:

var yesterday = (function(){this.setDate(this.getDate()-1); return this})
                  .call(new Date)

Or, if you prefer:

var yesterday = (function(d){ d.setDate(d.getDate()-1); return d})(new Date)

Or, if you prefer ES6 with arrow function:

let yesterday = ( d => new Date(d.setDate(d.getDate()-1)) )(new Date);
  • 5
    I'd prefer to avoid messing with the scope: var yesterday = (function(d){ d.setDate(d.getDate()-1); return d})(new Date) – Roy Tinker Nov 22 '13 at 21:41
  • 2
    If you need a one-liner, use something like new Date( Date.now() - 24*60*60*1000 ); this has the benefit of only creating one Date object. But honestly, whoever's maintaining this code will be much happier to see the clear 2-line version than they would something throwing functions around (or milliseconds, for that matter). – Rob Whelan Jul 25 '14 at 1:21
61

Try this

var d = new Date();
d.setDate(d.getDate() - 1);
  • Next command d.setHours(19,59); To set the time to 7:59PM – James Jenkins Jun 3 '14 at 11:54
54

Surprisingly no answer point to the easiest cross browser solution

To find exactly the same time yesterday:

var yesterday = new Date(Date.now() - 86400000); // that is: 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000

That is if you wanna go dependency free, otherwise I'd recommend using http://momentjs.com

  • 4
    How does this work when daylight savings changes? Wouldn't that bump it ahead / behind an hour? – Adam Tegen Oct 25 '17 at 16:13
17

To generalize the question and make other diff calculations use:

var yesterday = new Date((new Date()).valueOf() - 1000*60*60*24);

this creates a new date object based on the value of "now" as an integer which represents the unix epoch in milliseconds subtracting one day.

Two days ago:

var twoDaysAgo = new Date((new Date()).valueOf() - 1000*60*60*24*2);

An hour ago:

var oneHourAgo = new Date((new Date()).valueOf() - 1000*60*60);
  • This seems to be the safest method as we are operating on unix epoch expressed in terms of milliseconds. So the arithmetic is safer than doing something like getDate()-1. I have not tried getDate()-1, but based on the documentation of getDate(), it will return 1 if today's date is 1st of any month. And 1-1 = 0 is not a valid date. Not sure how setDate(0) will work. – Kapil Pendse Jun 27 '14 at 10:21
  • 1
    This was my approach, though you can simplify it a bit as well -- try something like new Date( Date.now() - 24*60*60*1000 ); – Rob Whelan Jul 25 '14 at 1:15
  • setDate(0), btw, would be fine -- it would flip to the last day of the previous month. But it seems tidier (and more intuitive) to drop do the millisecond representation here, to me -- the one downside is that "number of millis in a day" is not as obvious, so it could be easy to mistype that calculation. – Rob Whelan Jul 25 '14 at 1:18
  • Working with unix time seems like the more reliable option. This should be rated higher. – Paul Jan 29 '15 at 8:07
  • Yea, I like this approach the best. There's less ambiguity. I ended up going with new Date(Date.parse(new Date()) - 86400000). Though I do like Date.now() so maybe I'll try that instead. It'll save an extra date. – coblr Aug 18 '15 at 18:18
7
//Create a date object using the current time
var now = new Date();

//Subtract one day from it
now.setDate(now.getDate()-1);
7

I use moment library, it is very flexible and easy to use.

In your case:

let yesterday = moment().add(-1, 'day').toDate();

====== UPDATE ======

let yesterday = moment().subtract(1, 'day').toDate();
  • 1
    you'd better use subtract instead of add – Thomas Ayoub May 10 '18 at 8:47
  • Works fine too! Nice job for ng FullCalendar and his validRange – XenoX Oct 16 '18 at 10:18
5

This will produce yesterday at 00:00 with minutes precision

var d = new Date();
d.setDate(d.getDate() - 1);
d.setTime(d.getTime()-d.getHours()*3600*1000-d.getMinutes()*60*1000);
3
new Date(new Date().setDate(new Date().getDate()-1))
  • 2
    Might you add a bit of explanation? Plain code blocks alone aren't all that helpful – CertainPerformance Aug 9 '18 at 6:02
  • Works fine ! Thank you – XenoX Oct 16 '18 at 10:15
3

var today = new Date();
var yesterday1 = new Date(new Date().setDate(new Date().getDate() - 1));
var yesterday2 = new Date(Date.now() - 86400000);
var yesterday3 = new Date(Date.now() - 1000*60*60*24);
var yesterday4 = new Date((new Date()).valueOf() - 1000*60*60*24);
console.log("Today: "+today);
console.log("Yesterday: "+yesterday1);
console.log("Yesterday: "+yesterday2);
console.log("Yesterday: "+yesterday3);
console.log("Yesterday: "+yesterday4);

2
d.setHours(0,0,0,0);

will do the trick

  • 1
    Will it? I thought this just set your hours, minutes and seconds to 0, but does not actually change the date? – Jesper Bylund Aug 30 '16 at 7:45
  • I had to use negative numbers to get to yesterday: d.setHours(-1,0,0,0). This will return yesterday's date, but it may not be the time you want (23:00:00) – cs_pupil Aug 1 at 17:41
2

Give this a try, works for me:

var today = new Date();
var yesterday = new Date(today.setDate(today.getDate() - 1)); `

This got me a date object back for yesterday

  • Since you are using today.setDate, today will change to yesterday as well. It's better to create yesterday variable and then set it. var yesterday = new Date(); yesterday.setDate(today.GetDate() - 1) so you can use both today and yesterday – PersyJack Apr 2 at 19:59
0

If you want to both get the date for yesterday and format that date in a human readable format, consider creating a custom DateHelper object that looks something like this :

var DateHelper = {
    addDays : function(aDate, numberOfDays) {
        aDate.setDate(aDate.getDate() + numberOfDays); // Add numberOfDays
        return aDate;                                  // Return the date
    },
    format : function format(date) {
        return [
           ("0" + date.getDate()).slice(-2),           // Get day and pad it with zeroes
           ("0" + (date.getMonth()+1)).slice(-2),      // Get month and pad it with zeroes
           date.getFullYear()                          // Get full year
        ].join('/');                                   // Glue the pieces together
    }
}

// With this helper, you can now just use one line of readable code to :
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------
// 1. Get the current date
// 2. Subtract 1 day
// 3. Format it
// 4. Output it
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------
document.body.innerHTML = DateHelper.format(DateHelper.addDays(new Date(), -1));

(see also this Fiddle)

0

You can use momentjs it is very helpful you can achieve a lot of things with this library.

Get yesterday date with current timing moment().subtract(1, 'days').toString()

Get yesterday date with a start of the date moment().subtract(1, 'days').startOf('day').toString()

-1

"Date.now() - 86400000" won't work on the Daylight Saving end day (which has 25 hours that day)

Another option is to use Closure:

var d = new goog.date.Date();
d.add(new goog.date.Interval(0, 0, -1));

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