0

I am a new programmer and I am trying to sort a vector of integers by their parities - put even numbers in front of odds. The order inside of the odd or even numbers themselves doesn't matter. For example, given an input [3,1,2,4], the output can be [2,4,3,1] or [4,2,1,3], etc. Below is my c++ code, sometimes I got luck that the vector gets sorted properly, sometimes it doesn't. I exported the odd and even vectors and they look correct, but when I tried to combine them together it is just messed up. Can someone please help me debug?

class Solution {
public:
    vector<int> sortArrayByParity(vector<int>& A) {
        unordered_multiset<int> even;
        unordered_multiset<int> odd;
        vector<int> result(A.size());

        for(int C:A)
        {
            if(C%2 == 0)
                even.insert(C);
            else
                odd.insert(C);
        }
        merge(even.begin(),even.end(),odd.begin(),odd.end(),result.begin());
        return result;
    }
};
  • std::merge works with sorted ranges. en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/merge Your ranges are not sorted. – Retired Ninja Mar 12 '19 at 3:37
  • consider using std::sort from the algorithms header with a custom comparator that sorts them the way you want them. – Cruz Jean Mar 12 '19 at 3:47
  • std::merge doesn't do what you think it does. – BessieTheCow Mar 12 '19 at 4:50
5

If you just need even values before odds and not a complete sort I suggest you use std::partition. You give it two iterators and a predicate. The elements where the predicate returns true will appear before the others. It works in-place and should be very fast.

Something like this:

std::vector<int> sortArrayByParity(std::vector<int>& A)
{
    std::partition(A.begin(), A.end(), [](int value) { return value % 2 == 0; });
    return A;
}
2

Because the merge function assumes that the two ranges are sorted, which is used as in merge sort. Instead, you should just use the insert function of vector:

result.insert(result.end(), even.begin(), even.end());
result.insert(result.end(), odd.begin(), odd.end());
return result;
2

There is no need to create three separate vectors. As you have allocated enough space in the result vector, that vector can be used as the final vector also to store your sub vectors, storing the separated odd and even numbers.

The value of using a vector, which under the covers is an array, is to avoid inserts and moves. Arrays/Vectors are fast because they allow immediate access to memory as an offset from the beginning. Take advantage of this!

The code simply keeps an index to the next odd and even indices and then assigns the correct cell accordingly.

class Solution {

public:
// As this function does not access any members, it can be made static
    static std::vector<int> sortArrayByParity(std::vector<int>& A) {

      std::vector<int> result(A.size());
      uint even_index = 0;
      uint odd_index = A.size()-1;

      for(int element: A)
      {
        if(element%2 == 0)
          result[even_index++] = element;
        else
          result[odd_index--] = element;
      }
      return result;
    }
};
0

Taking advantage of the fact that you don't care about the order among the even or odd numbers themselves, you could use a very simple algorithm to sort the array in-place:

  // Assume helper function is_even() and is_odd() are defined.
  void sortArrayByParity(std::vector<int>& A)
  {
    int i = 0;  // scanning from beginning
    int j = A.size()-1;  // scanning from end
    do {
      while (i < j && is_even(A[i])) ++i;  // A[i] is an even at the front
      while (i < j && is_odd(A[j])) --j;  // A[j] is an odd at the back
      if (i >= j) break;
      // Now A[i] must be an odd number in front of an even number A[j]
      std::swap(A[i], A[j]);
      ++i;
      --j;
    } while (true);
  }

Note that the function above returns void, since the vector is sorted in-place. If you do want to return a sorted copy of input vector, you'd need to define a new vector inside the function, and copy the elements right before every ++i and --j above (and of course do not use std::swap but copy the elements cross-way instead; also, pass A as const std::vector<int>& A).

  // Assume helper function is_even() and is_odd() are defined.
  std::vector<int> sortArrayByParity(const std::vector<int>& A)
  {
    std::vector<int> B(A.size());
    int i = 0;  // scanning from beginning
    int j = A.size()-1;  // scanning from end
    do {
      while (i < j && is_even(A[i])) {
        B[i] = A[i];
        ++i;
      }
      while (i < j && is_odd(A[j])) {
        B[j] = A[j];
        --j;
      }
      if (i >= j) break;
      // Now A[i] must be an odd number in front of an even number A[j]
      B[i] = A[j];
      B[j] = A[i];
      ++i;
      --j;
    } while (true);
    return B;
  }

In both cases (in-place or out-of-place) above, the function has complexity O(N), N being number of elements in A, much better than the general O(N log N) for sorting N elements. This is because the problem doesn't actually sort much -- it only separates even from odd. There's therefore no need to invoke a full-fledged sorting algorithm.

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