1

I have a dataframe of the following type-
df

A   B   C
5   10  15
20  25  30

I want the following operation to be done-

A_B   A_C  B_C
-0.33 -0.5 -0.2
-0.11 -0.2 -0.09

A_B,A_C,B_C corresponds to -

A_B: A-B/A+B
A_C: A-C/A+C
B_C: B-C/B+C    

which I am doing using-

 colnames = df.columns.tolist()[:-1]
 list_name=[]
 for i,c in enumerate(colnames):
     if i!=len(colnames):
        for k in range(i+1,len(colnames)):
            df[c+'_'+colnames[k]]=(df[c]- 
            df[colnames[k]])/(df[c]+df[colnames[k]])
            list_name.append(c+'_'+colnames[k])

But the issue is my actual dataframe is of the size of 5*381 shape so the actual number of combination of A_B, A_C and so on are coming out to be 5*72390 shape which is taking 60 minutes to run. So I am trying to convert it into numpy array so that I can optimise it using Numba to calculate it efficiently(Parallel programming approach to solve pandas problems) but I am unable to convert it into numpy array. Also, any other solutions to solve this problem is also welcomed.

  • Is it important to get the column names right for the output? – Divakar Mar 12 at 14:42
  • @Divakar Yes it is important. – Bing Mar 12 at 14:54
  • 1
    Were you able to test out the posted approaches at your end? – Divakar Mar 15 at 19:48
  • @Divakar Yes, it worked perfectly.Thank You – Bing Mar 25 at 13:53
4

Use:

df = pd.DataFrame({
         'A':[5,20],
         'B':[10,25],
         'C':[15,30]
})

print (df)
    A   B   C
0   5  10  15
1  20  25  30

First get all combinations of columns to 2 lists (a is for first value of tuples, b is for second):

from  itertools import combinations

a, b = zip(*(combinations(df.columns, 2)))

Then use DataFrame.loc for repeat columns by lists:

df1 = df.loc[:, a]
print (df1)
    A   A   B
0   5   5  10
1  20  20  25

df2 = df.loc[:, b]
print (df2)
    B   C   C
0  10  15  15
1  25  30  30

Convert values to numpy arrays for final DataFrame and get new columns names by list comprehension:

c = [f'{x}_{y}' for x, y in zip(a, b)]
arr1 = df1.values
arr2 = df2.values
df = pd.DataFrame((arr1-arr2)/(arr1+arr2), columns=c)
print (df)
        A_B  A_C       B_C
0 -0.333333 -0.5 -0.200000
1 -0.111111 -0.2 -0.090909

Another solution is very similar, only create combination by arange by length of columns and last new columns names are created by indexing:

from  itertools import combinations

a, b = zip(*(combinations(np.arange(len(df.columns)), 2)))
arr = df.values
cols = df.columns.values
arr1 = arr[:, a]
arr2 = arr[:, b]
c = [f'{x}_{y}' for x, y in zip(cols[np.array(a)], cols[np.array(b)])]
df = pd.DataFrame((arr1-arr2)/(arr1+arr2), columns=c)

Performance:

Tested in 5 rows and 381 columns:

np.random.seed(2019)
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(10,100,(5,381)))
df.columns = ['c'+str(i+1) for i in range(df.shape[1])]
#print (df)

In [4]: %%timeit
   ...: a, b = zip(*(combinations(np.arange(len(df.columns)), 2)))
   ...: arr = df.values
   ...: cols = df.columns.values
   ...: arr1 = arr[:, a]
   ...: arr2 = arr[:, b]
   ...: c = [f'{x}_{y}' for x, y in zip(cols[np.array(a)], cols[np.array(b)])]
   ...: pd.DataFrame((arr1-arr2)/(arr1+arr2), columns=c)
   ...: 
62 ms ± 7.29 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [5]: %%timeit
   ...: a, b = zip(*(combinations(df.columns, 2)))
   ...: df1 = df.loc[:, a]
   ...: df2 = df.loc[:, b]
   ...: arr1 = df1.values
   ...: arr2 = df2.values
   ...: c = [f'{x}_{y}' for x, y in zip(a, b)]
   ...: pd.DataFrame((arr1-arr2)/(arr1+arr2), columns=c)
   ...: 
63.2 ms ± 253 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [7]: %%timeit
   ...: func1(df)
   ...: 
89.2 ms ± 331 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [8]: %%timeit
   ...: a, b = zip(*(combinations(df.columns, 2)))
   ...: df1 = df.loc[:, a]
   ...: df2 = df.loc[:, b]
   ...: c = [f'{x}_{y}' for x, y in zip(a, b)]
   ...: pd.DataFrame((df1.values-df2.values)/(df1.values+df2.values), columns=c)
   ...: 
69.8 ms ± 6.04 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
  • 1
    This is genius, this is really genius. – Bing Mar 12 at 8:21
  • 2
    @Bing - Hmmm, it depends. btw, is possible change title of question something like Increase performance of arithmetic operations with combinations of columns names ? – jezrael Mar 12 at 8:24
2

Here's one using NumPy and it's powerful functionality of slicing -

def func1(df):
    a = df.values
    n = a.shape[1]
    L = n*(n-1)//2
    idx = np.concatenate(( [0], np.arange(n-1,0,-1).cumsum() ))
    start, stop = idx[:-1], idx[1:]
    c = df.columns.values.astype(str)
    d = 2*int(''.join(x for x in str(c.dtype) if x.isdigit()))+1
    outc = np.empty(L,dtype='S'+str(2*d+1))
    out = np.empty((a.shape[0],L))
    for i,(s0,s1) in enumerate(zip(start, stop)):
        outc[s0:s1] = np.char.add(c[i]+'_',c[i+1:])
        out[:,s0:s1] = (a[:,i,None]-a[:,i+1:])/(a[:,i,None]+a[:,i+1:])
    return pd.DataFrame(out,columns=outc)

Sample run -

In [361]: df
Out[361]: 
    A   B   C
0   5  10  15
1  20  25  30

In [362]: func1(df)
Out[362]: 
        A_B  A_C       B_C
0 -0.333333 -0.5 -0.200000
1 -0.111111 -0.2 -0.090909

Timings on 5 x 381 random array -

In [147]: df = cdf(np.random.randint(10,100,(5,381)))
     ...: df.columns = ['c'+str(i+1) for i in range(df.shape[1])]

# @jezrael's soln
In [148]: %%timeit
     ...: a, b = zip(*(combinations(df.columns, 2)))
     ...: df1 = df.loc[:, a]
     ...: df2 = df.loc[:, b]
     ...: c = [x+'_'+y for x, y in zip(a, b)]
     ...: pd.DataFrame((df1.values-df2.values)/(df1.values+df2.values), columns=c)
10 loops, best of 3: 58.1 ms per loop

# From this post
In [149]: %timeit func1(df)
10 loops, best of 3: 22.6 ms per loop
  • I have yet to test this approach, will update again after testing it. – Bing Mar 12 at 14:55
  • @Bing Modified my approach a bit to improve performance. Also, added timings, hopefully they will be comparable to your test case results. – Divakar Mar 12 at 15:43
  • Just modify answer for not repeat call .values, is possible add to timings? Thank you. – jezrael Mar 12 at 15:46
  • @jezrael Doesn't seem to change the timings much, in fact seems slightly slower with the new changes. Try it at your end? – Divakar Mar 12 at 15:51
  • @Divakar - It seems also depends timings by number of rows, tested with 1000 rows and a bit faster (under python 3.6, pandas 0.24.1 ,win7) – jezrael Mar 12 at 15:57
0

Pandas has an in-built function to do this: df.values

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'A': [5, 20], 'B': [10, 25], 'C': [15,30]})

print(df.head())
#     A   B   C
# 0   5  10  15
# 1  20  25  30

print(df.values)
# array([[ 5, 10, 15],
#        [20, 25, 30]], dtype=int64)

And the subsequent calculation of A_B, A_C, and B_C.

def A_B(x):
    return (x[0]-x[1])/(x[0]+x[1])

def A_C(x):
    return (x[0]-x[2])/(x[0]+x[2])

def B_C(x):
    return (x[1]-x[2])/(x[1]+x[2])

def combine(x):
    return pd.DataFrame({'A_B': A_B(x), 'A_C': A_C(x), 'B_C': B_C(x)})

combine(df.values.T)
#         A_B  A_C       B_C
# 0 -0.333333 -0.5 -0.200000
# 1 -0.111111 -0.2 -0.090909
  • Yes, but how to perform A-B/A+B and similar steps for the array obtained. – Bing Mar 12 at 8:06
  • 2
    @Bing, you asked how to convert it into a np.ndarray. People are encouraged to solve their problems on their own. We are here to help and point people in the right direction, not to do s.o. work. – anki Mar 12 at 8:11
  • Yes, but the actual problem was optimization, not the conversion if you would have observed. – Bing Mar 12 at 8:19

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