1

I've got following issue with Postgres:

Got two tables A and B:

A got 64 mln records
B got 16 mln records
A got b_id field which is indexed --> ix_A_b_id
B got datetime_field which is indexed --> ix_B_datetime

Got following query:

SELECT 
  A.id, 
  B.some_field 
FROM 
  A 
JOIN 
  B 
ON A.b_id = B.id
WHERE
  B.datetime_field BETWEEN 'from' AND 'to'

This query is fine when difference between from and to is small, in that case postgres use both indexes and i get results quite fast

When difference between dates is bigger query is slowing much, because postgres decides to use ix_B_datetime only and then Full Scan on table with 64 M records... which is simple stupid

I found point when optimizer decides that using Full Scan is faster. For dates between

2019-03-10 17:05:00 and 2019-03-15 01:00:00

it got similar cost like for

2019-03-10 17:00:00 and 2019-03-15 01:00:00.

But fetching time for first query is something about 50 ms and for second almost 2 minutes.

Plans are below

Nested Loop  (cost=1.00..3484455.17 rows=113057 width=8)
  ->  Index Scan using ix_B_datetime on B  (cost=0.44..80197.62 rows=28561 width=12)
        Index Cond: ((datetime_field >= '2019-03-10 17:05:00'::timestamp without time zone) AND (datetime_field < '2019-03-15 01:00:00'::timestamp without time zone))
  ->  Index Scan using ix_A_b_id on A  (cost=0.56..112.18 rows=701 width=12)
        Index Cond: (b_id = B.id)
Hash Join  (cost=80615.72..3450771.89 rows=113148 width=8)
  Hash Cond: (A.b_id = B.id)
  ->  Seq Scan on spot  (cost=0.00..3119079.50 rows=66652050 width=12)
  ->  Hash  (cost=80258.42..80258.42 rows=28584 width=12)
        ->  Index Scan using ix_B_datetime on B  (cost=0.44..80258.42 rows=28584 width=12)
              Index Cond: ((datetime_field >= '2019-03-10 17:00:00'::timestamp without time zone) AND (datetime_field < '2019-03-15 01:00:00'::timestamp without time zone))

So my question is why my Postgres lies about costs? Why it calculates something more expensive as it is actually? How to fix that?

Temporary I had to rewrite query to always use index on table A but I do not like following solution, because it's hacky, not clear and slower for small chunks of data but much faster for bigger chunks

with cc as (
     select id, some_field from B WHERE B.datetime_field >= '2019-03-08'
  AND B.datetime_field < '2019-03-15'
  )
SELECT X.id, Y.some_field
FROM (SELECT b_id, id from A where b_id in (SELECT id from cc)) X
JOIN (SELECT id, some_field FROM cc) Y ON X.b_id = Y.id

EDIT: So as @a_horse_with_no_name suggested I've played with RANDOM_PAGE_COST

I've modified query to count number of entries because fetching all was unnecessary so query looks following

SELECT count(*) FROM (
SELECT 
  A.id, 
  B.some_field 
FROM 
  A 
JOIN 
  B 
ON A.b_id = B.id
WHERE
  B.datetime_field BETWEEN '2019-03-01 00:00:00' AND '2019-03-15 01:00:00'
) A

And I've tested different levels of cost

RANDOM_PAGE_COST=0.25

Aggregate  (cost=3491773.34..3491773.35 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=4166.998..4166.999 rows=1 loops=1)
  Buffers: shared hit=1939402
  ->  Nested Loop  (cost=1.00..3490398.51 rows=549932 width=0) (actual time=0.041..3620.975 rows=2462836 loops=1)
        Buffers: shared hit=1939402
        ->  Index Scan using ix_B_datetime_field on B  (cost=0.44..24902.79 rows=138927 width=8) (actual time=0.013..364.018 rows=313399 loops=1)
              Index Cond: ((datetime_field >= '2019-03-01 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone) AND (datetime_field < '2019-03-15 01:00:00'::timestamp without time zone))
              Buffers: shared hit=311461
        ->  Index Only Scan using A_b_id_index on A  (cost=0.56..17.93 rows=701 width=8) (actual time=0.004..0.007 rows=8 loops=313399)
              Index Cond: (b_id = B.id)
              Heap Fetches: 2462836
              Buffers: shared hit=1627941
Planning time: 0.316 ms
Execution time: 4167.040 ms

RANDOM_PAGE_COST=1

Aggregate  (cost=3918191.39..3918191.40 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=281236.100..281236.101 rows=1 loops=1)
"  Buffers: shared hit=7531789 read=2567818, temp read=693 written=693"
  ->  Merge Join  (cost=102182.07..3916816.56 rows=549932 width=0) (actual time=243755.551..280666.992 rows=2462836 loops=1)
        Merge Cond: (A.b_id = B.id)
"        Buffers: shared hit=7531789 read=2567818, temp read=693 written=693"
        ->  Index Only Scan using A_b_id_index on A  (cost=0.56..3685479.55 rows=66652050 width=8) (actual time=0.010..263635.124 rows=64700055 loops=1)
              Heap Fetches: 64700055
              Buffers: shared hit=7220328 read=2567818
        ->  Materialize  (cost=101543.05..102237.68 rows=138927 width=8) (actual time=523.618..1287.145 rows=2503965 loops=1)
"              Buffers: shared hit=311461, temp read=693 written=693"
              ->  Sort  (cost=101543.05..101890.36 rows=138927 width=8) (actual time=523.616..674.736 rows=313399 loops=1)
                    Sort Key: B.id
                    Sort Method: external merge  Disk: 5504kB
"                    Buffers: shared hit=311461, temp read=693 written=693"
                    ->  Index Scan using ix_B_datetime_field on B  (cost=0.44..88589.92 rows=138927 width=8) (actual time=0.013..322.016 rows=313399 loops=1)
                          Index Cond: ((datetime_field >= '2019-03-01 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone) AND (datetime_field < '2019-03-15 01:00:00'::timestamp without time zone))
                          Buffers: shared hit=311461
Planning time: 0.314 ms
Execution time: 281237.202 ms

RANDOM_PAGE_COST=2

Aggregate  (cost=4072947.53..4072947.54 rows=1 width=8) (actual time=166896.775..166896.776 rows=1 loops=1)
"  Buffers: shared hit=696849 read=2067171, temp read=194524 written=194516"
  ->  Hash Join  (cost=175785.69..4071572.70 rows=549932 width=0) (actual time=29321.835..166332.812 rows=2462836 loops=1)
        Hash Cond: (A.B_id = B.id)
"        Buffers: shared hit=696849 read=2067171, temp read=194524 written=194516"
        ->  Seq Scan on A  (cost=0.00..3119079.50 rows=66652050 width=8) (actual time=0.008..108959.789 rows=64700055 loops=1)
              Buffers: shared hit=437580 read=2014979
        ->  Hash  (cost=173506.11..173506.11 rows=138927 width=8) (actual time=29321.416..29321.416 rows=313399 loops=1)
              Buckets: 131072 (originally 131072)  Batches: 8 (originally 2)  Memory Usage: 4084kB
"              Buffers: shared hit=259269 read=52192, temp written=803"
              ->  Index Scan using ix_B_datetime_field on B  (cost=0.44..173506.11 rows=138927 width=8) (actual time=1.676..29158.413 rows=313399 loops=1)
                    Index Cond: ((datetime_field >= '2019-03-01 00:00:00'::timestamp without time zone) AND (datetime_field < '2019-03-15 01:00:00'::timestamp without time zone))
                    Buffers: shared hit=259269 read=52192
Planning time: 7.367 ms
Execution time: 166896.824 ms

Still it's unclear for me, cost 0.25 is best for me but everywhere I can read that for ssd disk it should be 1-1.5. (I'm using AWS instance with ssd)

What is weird at cost 1 plan is worse than at 2 and 0.25 So what value to pick? Is there any possibility to calculate it? Costs 0.25 > 2 > 1 efficiency in that case, what about other cases? How can I be sure that 0.25 which is good for my query won't break other queries. Do I need to write performance tests for every query I got?

  • 1
    It doesn't "lie" - the cost value is the result of a formula that adds up the cost for each step of the execution plan based on the estimated row counts. The cost is not a guarantee for anything, it's just an estimation. If you see that a plan with many index scans is in fact faster than one with a seq scan you might have a fast harddisk and thus can lower the value for random_page_cost - which in turn will lower the total cost for a plan using an index scan – a_horse_with_no_name Mar 12 '19 at 10:00
  • 1
    As I said: adjust the value for random_page_cost – a_horse_with_no_name Mar 12 '19 at 10:41
  • 1
    Which version of PostgreSQL? Did you make sure that your tables' statistics are up-to-date (analyze <table>)? Also, what's the data type for column A.b_id and how are values of it distributed over time (rather random, I guess)? The most likely reason PostgreSQL decides to do a sequential scan is that values really are randomly distributed, for which an index scan would result into too much random disk I/O. If that is the case, then @a_horse_with_no_name is right but reducing random_page_cost will only help if you are running on rather low-latency disk (SSD). – Ancoron Mar 12 '19 at 11:13
  • 1
    That depends on your hardware. When running on SSD, I usually start with a value such as 1.5. Also, can you re-explain the queries with EXPLAIN (ANALYZE, BUFFERS) ...? That will give us also more information. – Ancoron Mar 12 '19 at 11:19
  • 1
    Oh my... it's selecting almost the complete table A, that's why it uses a sequential scan, which is usually (even on SSD) way faster in such a case than index-scans. That's the difference you see between 1 and 2. Also, I see a sort on disk, an indicator you should increase work_mem parameter (e.g. to ~32 MiB for a start), as long as you don't have too many parallel complex queries. In addition, the case for 0.25 is pretty useless here as it didn't have to read anything from disk, which makes it fast. How many provisioned IOPS do you have? – Ancoron Mar 13 '19 at 0:12

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