7

I have the following key/value object

form: {
  id: {value: this.item.id, hidden: true},
  title: {value: this.item.title},
  translations: {
    en: {
      locale: {value: 'en', hidden: true},
      name: {value: 'Hello World'}
    },
    nl: {
      locale: {value: 'nl', hidden: true},
      name: {value: 'Hallo Wereld'}
    }
  }
}

So each key has an object with a value and a hidden attribute, I'm stuck on how to achieve the following. Transform the nested object so each key just has it's value. Not the object with value and hidden. The big issue it seems for me is that it's nested.. So it has to work recursive.

This is the desired end result

form: {
  id: this.item.id,
  title: this.item.title,
  translations: {
    en: {
      locale: 'en',
      name: 'Hello World'
    },
    nl: {
      locale: 'nl',
      name: 'Hallo Wereld'
    }
  }
}

I've tried

Using a combination of Object.keys(form).map(...), which gives me the key of each item, but that's not going to work recursive I'm afraid.

  • Thanks for spotting the typo, Mamun, it's fixed now. – Notflip Mar 12 at 13:01
  • Obtaining the value from keys and checking for typeOf and if that results to object, then get the keys for that object perhaps? – Krishna Prashatt Mar 12 at 13:04
  • All values are objects, as you can see in my first code block. – Notflip Mar 12 at 13:06
  • Make a recursive function that takes an object as a parameter. Loop over keys and check if it is an object then call the function with the new object as parameter – DTul Mar 12 at 13:06
  • I may be wrong but I dont think lines like this.item.id & this.item.title & so on will actually work. Self referencing during object initializing seems dont work – brk Mar 12 at 13:37
17

function transform(obj) {
  return Object.entries(obj).reduce((newObj, [name, value]) => ({ ...newObj, [name]: value.value === undefined ? transform(value) : value.value  }), {})
}

const form = {
  id: {value: '77777', hidden: true},
  title: {value: '11111'},
  translations: {
    en: {
      locale: {value: 'en', hidden: true},
      name: {value: 'Hello World'}
    },
    nl: {
      locale: {value: 'nl', hidden: true},
      name: {value: 'Hallo Wereld'}
    }
  }
}

console.log(transform(form))

Explanation:

function transform(obj) {
  const entries = Object.entries(obj) // transform object to Array<[propertyName, propertyValue]>

  const tranformedObject = entries.reduce(reducer, {}) // inital value for the first arg of reducer is {}

  return tranformedObject
}

function reducer(newObj, [propertyName, propertyValue]) { // name 
  return {
    ...newObj, // get all properties (that we already set) from prev newObj
    [propertyName]: propertyValue.value === undefined ? transform(propertyValue) : propertyValue.value // if property has .value use it or use recursively tranformed object
  }  // returned value will be set to newObj, and than returned to tranformedObject
}

{ ...prop, [name]: vaue } - it's ES6 syntax

  • If you have time, feel free to explain, annotate the code! – Notflip Mar 12 at 13:13
  • @Notflip check out – AlexOwl Mar 12 at 13:30
  • Strangly enough I'm getting "Maximum call stack size exceeded", I changed some data but it's very similar. I think there's an infinite loop with the || transform(value), and it's to do with the Translations object: imgur.com/a/PPPYT5B – Notflip Mar 13 at 9:28
  • Ok found the issue, when a field has empty string or 0, it also passes as undefined.. and triggers a re-run of transform. – Notflip Mar 13 at 9:41
  • Edited the answer to reflect this change! – Notflip Mar 13 at 10:10
0

I don't know about performance of this solution, but it's really small

function transform(obj) {
  return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj, (key, value) => "value" in value ? value.value : value))
}

const form = {
  id: {value: '77777', hidden: true},
  title: {value: '11111'},
  translations: {
    en: {
      locale: {value: 'en', hidden: true},
      name: {value: 'Hello World'}
    },
    nl: {
      locale: {value: 'nl', hidden: true},
      name: {value: 'Hallo Wereld'}
    }
  }
}

console.log(transform(form))

Explanation: JSON.stringify accepts replacer parameter which can be used to transform any value as you want

// My mind was blown when i figured this solution 😂😂

  • @Notflip what do you think about my solution? 😁😁 – AlexOwl Mar 13 at 18:02

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