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First let me preface that I understand why non-reentrant functions may cause a deadlock in a signal handler, however I cannot actually trigger the issue no matter how hard I try.

I have my first program running 1024 malloc and printfs each signal, and I have several other programs running with 2 threads per program firing signals at the first and even after running them for half an hour straight I see no deadlocks.

I am compiling and running these programs on 64bit Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS (Trusty) with gcc (Ubuntu 4.8.4-2ubuntu1~14.04.4) 4.8.4.

The first program (the one that should deadlock is) is:

// victim.c
#include  <signal.h>
#include  <unistd.h>
#include  <stdlib.h>
#include  <string.h>
#include  <stdio.h>
// global arr to put our malloc results to avoid
// compiler doing any funny business and optimizing
// away the malloc calls, not sure if this is really
// actually necessary or not
void *arr[1024];
// sigint handler to do bad stuff in a loop
void inthandler(int sig)
{
    int i = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 1024; ++i) {
        // some printf
        printf("Signal loop %d\n", i);
        if (arr[i]) free(arr[i]);
        arr[i] = malloc(1024);
    }
}
void main(void)
{
    // clear out our arr
    memset(arr, 0, sizeof(arr));
    // install our sigint handler
    signal(SIGINT, inthandler);
    // loop and wait for signals
    while (1) {}
}

And I compile it with (O0 to be explicit that we aren't optimizing):

gcc ./victim.c -O0 -o victim

Then the "killer" ie the program sending signals which should eventually trigger a deadlock in the victim is as follows:

// killer.c
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>
// hack to grab pid of victim
static pid_t __grab_victim_pid()
{
    char line[1024] = {0};
    FILE *command = NULL;
    pid_t pid = 0;
    printf("Getting pid of victim...\n");
    do {
        command = popen("pidof victim", "r");
        memset(line, 0, sizeof(line));
        fgets(line, sizeof(line) - 1, command);
        pid = strtoul(line, NULL, 10);
        pclose(command);
    } while (pid == 0);
    printf("Grabbed pid of victim: [%u]\n", pid);
    return pid;
}
static void *__loop_threadfunc(void *param)
{
    pid_t pid = 0;
    size_t i = 0;
    pid = __grab_victim_pid();
    while (1) {
        kill(pid, SIGINT);
    }
    return 0;
}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    pthread_t thread1;
    pthread_t thread2;
    // Spawn the threads
    if (pthread_create(&thread1, NULL, __loop_threadfunc, NULL) != 0 ||
        pthread_create(&thread2, NULL, __loop_threadfunc, NULL) != 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to create a thread\n");
        return 1;
    }
    // join the threads to wait for them
    pthread_join(thread1, NULL);
    pthread_join(thread2, NULL);
    return 0;
}

Compiled with:

gcc ./killer.c -O0 -o killer -lpthread

And then I run the victim process in one terminal, jump over to the other terminal and run several backgrounded killer processes, naturally the victim process spits out lots of lines to stdout from each signal it receives but it never appears to deadlock...

Furthermore the lines that are spit out are always in order, that is, the "Signal loop %d" messages never appear to be interrupted which indicates to me that a signal is never delivered mid-execution of the active signal handler. This seems to go against what everybody is saying about signal handlers.

Am I doing something wrong? Am I just extremely lucky? Or is maybe my OS hardened against this issue (is that even possible)?

I tried attaching strace to the victim and I am seeing that it always reports rt_sigreturn and then a subsequent SIGINT paired together:

rt_sigreturn()                          = 0
--- SIGINT {si_signo=SIGINT, si_code=SI_USER, si_pid=11564, si_uid=0} ---

I would imagine that the "SIGINT" needs to be delivered before the rt_sigreturn (before it exists from the signal handler) but that never seems to happen, it appears as if the process is blocking the SIGINT until the current signal handler has exited... (That can't be right can it?)

Thanks in advance, any clarification on this would be greatly appreciated!

Edit1: I have left 10 killer processes running on one victim process, will post results if anything happens.

Edit2: Could it have anything to do with the fact I am running these tests on a virtual machine?

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  • Non-reentrancy is not the only potential problem with calling non-async-signal-safe functions from a signal handler. It's at least as likely to be bitten by handlers running with very small stacks, which is often the case in practice. Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 18:55
  • You mean because it could eventually cause a stack overflow? Could you elaborate more? (But yes I am aware there are other issues, I just want to reproduce the deadlock issue for my own learning experience) Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 18:55
  • Yes, because the handler exhausts the available stack. This can produce various kinds of memory fault, but also possibly just incorrect behavior. Similarly, problems around non-reentrancy don't necessarily result in deadlock. They might just yield wrong results. Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 18:58
  • Right that makes sense, however I am simply not seeing (from the printfs, and from strace) a signal ever being delivered while the current signal handler is running. It appears that it always completes the signal handler before receiving another one... I would imagine a signal must be delivered while the current handler isn't complete for any such stack overflow or deadlock to occur right? Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:00

3 Answers 3

2

You are not seeing any deadlock or other failure for two reasons. First, and most important, your program is sitting in a spin loop waiting for signals to be delivered.

// loop and wait for signals
while (1) {}

This means there is never anything "interesting" for a signal handler to interrupt. If you changed it to something like this:

while (1) {
  size_t n = rand();
  char *p = malloc(n);
  free(p);
}

then you'd have a chance of your signal handler that calls malloc interrupting the normal flow of execution inside malloc, which is one way that async signal handlers could cause a deadlock.

The other reason is, on your system, signal(SIGINT, handler) is installing a handler whose execution cannot be interrupted by another SIGINT. The C standard doesn't say whether signal does this or not, but most modern Unixes do it that way. You can get a signal handler whose execution can be interrupted by dropping down to the lower-level sigaction: replace your signal call with

struct sigaction sa;
sa.sa_handler = inthandler;
sa.sa_flags = SA_NODEFER | SA_RESTART;
sigemptyset(&sa.sa_mask);
sigaction(SIGINT, &sa, 0);

This will also enable the possibility of a signal arriving within the guts of malloc.

Signals are one of the most confusing and difficult aspects of the low-level Unix API. I encourage you to acquire a copy of W. Richard Stevens' book Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment and read the chapters on signal handling. It's an expensive book, but you should be able to request it at your local public library.

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  • So the main program (the while(1) loop) has to be executing the locking mechanism of printf/malloc when the signal is delivered? I was under the impression that the signal handler itself could be interrupted with another signal and therefore simply using malloc/printf in the signal handler alone was enough to open potential for deadlock if another signal arrives while the first handler is executing. Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:17
  • 1
    I was under the impression that the signal handler itself could be interrupted with another signal — That's what I'm talking about in the second half of my answer. Your C library happens to make that impossible when you use signal. You can ensure it's impossible by using sigaction and not setting SA_NODEFER, or you can ensure it is possible by using sigaction and setting SA_NODEFER.
    – zwol
    Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:21
  • Thanks I think you have cleared this up quite nicely, although I wish I could accept all of the answered because everybody has given me quality information. Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:31
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The question seems to boil down to the bit at the end, about whether a signal handler can be interrupted be receipt of the same signal it is already handling.

Am I doing something wrong? Am I just extremely lucky? Or is maybe my OS hardened against this issue (is that even possible)?

I tried attaching strace to the victim and I am seeing that it always reports rt_sigreturn and then a subsequent SIGINT paired together:

rt_sigreturn() = 0 --- SIGINT {si_signo=SIGINT, si_code=SI_USER, si_pid=11564, si_uid=0} ---

I would imagine that the "SIGINT" needs to be delivered before the rt_sigreturn (before it exists from the signal handler) but that never seems to happen, it appears as if the process is blocking the SIGINT until the current signal handler has exited... (That can't be right can it?)

In fact, it is entirely possible that SIGINT is blocked while a SIGINT is being handled. The Linux manual page for signal(2) features this warning at the beginning of the function description:

The behavior of signal() varies across UNIX versions, and has also varied historically across different versions of Linux. Avoid its use: use sigaction(2) instead.

The portability notes describe these variations on program behavior after a signal-handling function is installed via signal():

  • the disposition of the signal is reset to SIG_DFL when the handler is invoked for it. And the signal was not blocked. This was the original behavior of UNIX signal(), also implemented in System V.

  • the disposition of the signal is unchanged when the handler is invoked for it, and the signal is blocked while the handler is executing. This is the behavior implemented by BSD, which also causes certain system calls to be restarted if interrupted by receipt of a signal.

You are reasonably likely to be testing on a system that exhibits the latter, because Mac OS is a BSD, and although the Linux kernel's signal() syscall implements System V semantics, GLIBC's signal() wrapper function provides BSD semantics. Windows' implementation of signaling and signal handling is too feeble for your testing, so the only likely source of System V semantics would be a System V descendant such as Solaris or HP-UX (and I'm not certain about their behavior here). There are other operating systems, of course, but those I've mentioned cover the vast majority of installed base of general-purpose computers.

If you want to avoid the signal being blocked while its handler is running, then use sigaction() to install it, specifying the appropriate flag. For example,

struct sigaction action = {
    .sa_handler = inthandler,
    .sa_flags = SA_NODEFER
};

int result = sigaction(SIGINT, &action, NULL);
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  • Thank you very much, I am going to accept zwols answer because he clarified there is two ways I could trigger this problem, and I am actually preventing both of them from occurring based on my tests. You have opened my eyes to other information though and I thank you for that. Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:32
  • 1
    Incidentally, current versions of the Linux kernel don't provide a signal syscall, only sigaction. I'm not sure how long it's been like that.
    – zwol
    Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:48
1

I understand why non-reentrant functions may cause a deadlock in a signal handler, however I cannot actually trigger the issue no matter how hard I try.

I don't understand why you would think your particular example would end in a deadlock. Your process that s being targeted with signals is not doing anything in its main loop. It's therefore reasonably safe to call a reentrant function in its signal handler.

Furthermore, on Linux, the semantics of signal are effectively the same as BSD sematics. This means that, while the signal handler is running, further instances of the same signal are blocked. All of the blast of signals from your "killer" are handled sequentially by the "victim".

The potential problems from calling non reentrant functions are more insidious than merely grinding to a halt wit a deadlock. For example, if malloc is interrupted by a signal while it is in the middle of manipulating its data structures, calling malloc in the signal handler is like calling it on a corrupt heap. It won't necessarily cause a deadlock, you may just find an unexplained segmentation violation down the line, or just corrupt data. However, I should emphasise that this is not the situation you are seeing because you only call malloc in your signal handler.

5
  • > It's therefore reasonably safe to call a reentrant function in its signal handler. Why? Nothing anywhere has said anything about what the rest of the program is doing... Simply that you cannot call non-reentrant functions from a signal handler. Also, you may have pointed out my issue of using the same signal... Perhaps if I use two different signal handlers, will try that now. Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:11
  • 3
    You cannot in general call non-reentrant functions from a signal handler, but you can do it under special circumstances. One of those circumstances is when you have made it impossible for signal handlers to interrupt the normal flow of execution at a point where it would be a problem. Making the normal flow of execution be an empty infinite loop is one way to do that. The system primitives sigtimedwait and pselect are a more flexible way to do that.
    – zwol
    Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:19
  • 1
    @user6567423, the specifications reserve the possibility for implementations to break if your program does not conform. They do not in general require implementations to break when a program does not conform, and in particular, they do not require that in this specific area. Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:33
  • apologies @zwol I deleted the question because I think you already answered it and I was just misreading your answer. Thanks for all the help! Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:47
  • @user6567423 No worries, glad I could help.
    – zwol
    Commented Mar 12, 2019 at 19:52

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