1

Vectors have a nice explicit constructor which allows to initialize the vector with a given number of a given value, e.g. for a vector of ints:

std::vector<int> v(16, 0); // 16 zero ints.

I would like to use this syntax (or a similar simple syntax) to initialize a member variable. How can I achieve this? Did I overlook something?

I did some experiments:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Foo
{
    Foo() 
//        : v(16, 0) // B: Uncomment for case B.
    {
        std::cout << "v:" << v.size() << "\n";
    }

    // This is what I want: Vector with 16 zero ints, all details near the member definition.

    // A: Intuitive, but does not compile: error: expected identifier before numeric constant.
//    std::vector<int> v(16,0);

    // B: Old style. Works, but requires details in each constructor and far from the definition.
//    std::vector<int> v;

    // C: Two ints. List initialization.
//    std::vector<int> v{16,0}; 

    // D: One int. List initialization with comma operator expression.
//    std::vector<int> v{(16,0)};

    // E: Works for 16 but not for (1<<20). Ugly.
//    std::vector<int> v{0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

    // F: Works. The best I came up with so far. Somewhat redundant.
    std::vector<int> v = std::vector<int>(16, 0);

    // Question: Is there something shorter than F, more like A?
} foo;

int main() 
{
    // This is what I would like to be able to do for class member initialization:
    std::vector<int> v2(16,0); // 16 ints.
    std::cout << "v2:" << v2.size() << "\n";    
}

Concrete question: Is there are shorter/simpler variant than F?

Bonus question: What is the rationale for directly supporting list initialization syntax for member variables, but not the normal constructor syntax (e.g. A a(4, 8)? I see no problem to support case A and I find it intuitive.

(For my experiments I used GCC 8.1 on Linux and C++17.)

  • 2
    "What is the rationale for directly supporting list initialization syntax for member variables, but not the normal constructor syntax (e.g. A a(4, 8)?" Allowing this could lead to the most vexing parse, e.g. A a() declares a function named a that returns an A and takes no arguments. With arguments it should be unambiguous, but that would be my guess behind the reasoning. – 0x5453 Mar 12 at 20:06
  • 1
    It would be kind of nice to be able to declare a member as auto v = std::vector<int>(16, 0); – SirGuy Mar 12 at 20:07
  • Definitely a most vexing parse issue to allow using () in the in class member initialization. Unfortunately F is the best we have right now. – NathanOliver Mar 12 at 20:07
  • 3
    For B: I usually get around it by delegating. – Ted Lyngmo Mar 12 at 20:09
  • 1
    Regarding your actual question, F is the shortest form AFAIK, since default member initializers are only allowed to be either a "brace initializer" or an "equals initializer", and the "brace initializer" version will always choose the initializer_list overload. – 0x5453 Mar 12 at 20:09
3

What is the rationale for directly supporting list initialization syntax for member variables, but not the normal constructor syntax (e.g. A a(4, 8)? I see no problem to support case A and I find it intuitive.

While your example is fine, imagine you have

struct A {};

struct foo
{
    A a();
};

What is a? Is it a function or a default initialized A. Even if a rule was added that an empty set of parentheses was considered a function, we run into the same problem with

struct A {};
struct B {};

struct foo
{
    A a(B());
};

As a could either be a function taking a function type, or it is a variable taking a default constructed object. It is just too vexing to figure out.

Is there are shorter/simpler variant than F?

In C++17 with the introduction of class template argument deduction you can turn the initialization into

std::vector<int> foo{std::vector(16, 0)}; // the 0 is used to deduce int for the vector in the braces

which is shorter but I'm not sure if it is an clearer or would be understood by any easier.

  • Thanks! Yes! This is the main reason: The constructor syntax I can use inside functions collides with the function declaration syntax. This makes sense to me now. And thanks for pointing me at the Bar bar{Bar(16, 0)} syntax which I forgot about in my experiments. I like that most I think, even when I am forced to C++11. – Johannes Overmann Mar 12 at 20:47
  • @JohannesOvermann You're welcome. Glad to help. – NathanOliver Mar 12 at 20:48
4

While there is a bit of redundancy, there is nothing conceptually wrong with using

std::vector<int> v = std::vector<int>(16, 0);

Using

Foo() : v(16, 0) {}

is equally good.

If there are multiple constructors, you definitely don't want to repeat the v(16, 0) part in every constructor. In that case, use of delegating constructors is an option. I am not able to suggest anything concrete without more constructors in your class.

You can read more about delegating constructors at http://www.stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html#delegating-ctor.

  • Yes. I always disliked the initialization syntax which forced me to mention the initialization values of member variables in the right order in the constructor and not near the member variable. This was simply poorly designed in the language. It feels like a new language since C++11. Delegating constructors are nice, thanks for the link, but I still dislike mentioning all my member variables again in one constructor, in the right order. – Johannes Overmann Mar 12 at 20:54
  • @JohannesOvermann, we have come a long way from C-front based C++ compilers to C++11 :) – R Sahu Mar 12 at 21:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.