0

For those who don't know, spread syntax is a handy way to pass an undetermined number of parameters into a function, similar to this example:

  function debug (mode, string, ...params) {
    if (debug_enabled && window.console) {
      console.log(mode+": "+string+"(",...params,");");
    }
  }

Unfortunately this functionality is not supported on Internet Explorer and older versions of other browsers. There is more information on spread syntax and browser support here.

I am not using the spread syntax for anything critical, however having it present on the site is causing the JavaScript entirely to fail on those older browsers.

One option is that I can have a separate version of the script for older browsers and then based on the user agent, pass this script in. However, I would like to avoid this as it is a pain to maintain both files and as a general strategy this could become exponentially more complicated if done with other features. Also, there is a risk to wrongly classify the user's browser.

Another option is to find a way to avoid the use of spread syntax entirely in all features. However, this would likely increase development time and create code that is harder to understand and work with going forward. This doesn't seem like a good strategy to avoid using new features simply because a very small percentage of viewers wont be able to use them.

I was hoping that someone may have or know a clever way to detect support of spread syntax and exclude parts of the script if spread syntax is not supported by the user's browser. This way I can give users on older browsers an experience which is still functional, and only misses a few features. I have been searching online and haven't been able to find any code which does this. I think it might be impossible due to the fact it's a core syntax modification, however I can't find anything to fully confirm this is the case either.

1

While checking whether a browser supports spread and then loading the appropriate script is possible, there's a much easier option: integrate a tool like Babel into your build process to automatically transpile your code in ES6+ syntax down to ES5 automatically. For example, if you plug the following into Babel:

function debug (mode, string, ...params) {
  if (debug_enabled && window.console) {
    console.log(mode+": "+string+"(",...params,");");
  }
}

You get

"use strict";

function debug(mode, string) {
  if (debug_enabled && window.console) {
    var _console;

    for (var _len = arguments.length, params = new Array(_len > 2 ? _len - 2 : 0), _key = 2; _key < _len; _key++) {
      params[_key - 2] = arguments[_key];
    }

    (_console = console).log.apply(_console, [mode + ": " + string + "("].concat(params, [");"]));
  }
}

You can try a demo here.

This allows you to write, read, and debug in the latest and greatest version of the language, while still permitting obsolete browsers to understand your script's syntax.

Babel isn't limited to just transpiling spread syntax, of course - it can transpile all modern syntax down to ES5 (such as destructuring, object spread, exponentiation (**), and many more).

That said, note that the transpilation of syntax is different from new built-in functions. For example, Array.prototype.includes is an ES6 feature, but because it's a new function, not new syntax, it won't be transpiled - to get old browsers to understand new functions as well, use polyfills, for example, polyfill.io.

  • Thank so much! I think what you're saying is that what I'm trying to do via JavaScript isn't possible. My current development for this project involves a lot of iterative development, and I have a strong interest in keeping that cycle time minimal. However, it seems like I can just put this one part of the code though Babel and leave it obscure and that may be the easiest solution. And that's interesting that Babel does all the complicated translations but doesn't do something which seems simple like adding in functions that are new. Thanks so much for your response! – azoundria Mar 13 at 20:54
  • I have a couple questions: 1) It has "use strict", however I think I don't believe I need that. Is it less risky to changing the behaviour to include or omit that? 2) The translation produces longer code. Is this translation likely to have a negative effect on the execution time on ES6-compliant browsers? – azoundria Mar 13 at 21:02
  • The use strict was automatically added by Babel, I don't think it's necessary, but if the code doesn't have problems that would result in strict-throwing (such as implicitly creating global variables) there's no harm in including it. Yes, Babel will make code take longer to run on ES6+ browsers, but that's rarely something worth worrying about. – CertainPerformance Mar 16 at 2:56

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