3

I want to detect whether the values in the array 1 is in the same sequence as array2 under these circumstances:

var array1 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"];
var array2 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"]; // result: true, expected: true
or
var array1 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"];
var array2 = ["Bob", "Fred", "Jason"]; // result: false, expected: False
or 
var array1 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"];
var array2 = ["Bob", "Jason"];         // result: true, expected: True
or 
var array1 = ["Jason", "Fred", "Bob"];
var array2 = ["Bob", "Jason"];         // result: false, expected: False
or 
var array1 = ["Jason", "Bob"];
var array2 = ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"];  // result: false, expected: True - just because array 2 contains sue and array 1 doesn't, doesn't mean jason and bob aren't in the right order. They are. We need to ignore the fact sue is interrupting them.
or 
var array1 = ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"];
var array2 = ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"];  // result: false, expected: False
or 
var array1 = ["Sue", "Bob"];
var array2 = ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"];  // result: false, expected: False
or 
var array1 = ["Bob", "Sue"];
var array2 = ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"];  // result: false, expected: True - just because jason is playing third wheel doesn't mean bob and sue aren't in the correct order. they are. we need to ignore jason.
or 
var array1 = ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"];
var array2 = ["Bob", "Bob", "Sue"];  // result: false, expected: False
or 
var array1 = ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"];
var array2 = ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"];  // result: true, expected: true
or 
var array1 = ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"];
var array2 = ["Sue", "Bob"];  // result: false, expected: true - in this scenario, we have two Bobs. while Bob followed by Sue is false, sue followed by bob is true. we need to ignore the first Bob.

So far, I've gotten this:

if (array1.length > array2.length) {
    var arrayLength = array1.length;
} else if (array1.length < array2.length) {
    var arrayLength = array2.length;
} else {
    var arrayLength = array1.length;
}


for (var i = 0; i < arrayLength; i++){
    if (array1[i] !== array2[i]) { 
        return false; 
    } else {
        return true;
    }
}

My problem is that the above doesn't yield the expected results all of the time. Namely, if the two arrays are the same length, then I get the expected result, but if they aren't, I don't get the expected result.

I need to ignore missing or added values and purely look at if they are in the same order, despite those missing or added values.

  • 1
    In the loop: if (array1[i] !== array2[i]) { return false; } – Felix Kling Mar 12 at 21:43
  • Possible duplicate of How to compare arrays in JavaScript? – Steven Stark Mar 12 at 21:43
  • Can the same value appear multiple times in either array? – Gershom Maes Mar 12 at 21:47
  • Both arrays in your positive examples have the same first element. Is that part of the requirement? What about array1 = ["Jason", "Fred"]; array2 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"]; ? – Felix Kling Mar 12 at 21:47
  • @GershomMaes yes – Sweepster Mar 12 at 21:57
2

myArray is a bad name, as it is not an array. Its the minimum length that both arrays share, so name it minLength or so. Then you are right to go over all entries with an index i up to the minLength, but minLength[i] doesnt make sense. Instead you want to look up in the arrays, e.g. array1[i] and array2[i] and compare the results (with ===).

With that info you should be able to solve it in your way :)

How I would do that:

const result = array1.every((el, i) => i >= array2.length || el === array2[i]);
0

One possibility would be to .join both arrays by a separator that doesn't occur in any of the strings, then check to see if the longer one .includes the shorter:

const array1 = ["Jason", "Bob"];
const array2 = ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"];

const str1 = array1.join('_');
const str2 = array2.join('_');

console.log(
  str1.length > str2.length
  ? str1.includes(str2)
  : str2.includes(str1)
);

  • 2
    "a seperator that doesn't occur in any of the strings" is actually quite hard to find in a real world application – Jonas Wilms Mar 12 at 21:45
  • yours is actually the closest answer that gets me the expected results, however, they aren't wrong to point out the problem with the seperator... – Sweepster Mar 13 at 23:46
0

You coud check the elements of a slice of the minimum length of the arrays.

function sameOrder(a, b) {
    return a
        .slice(0, Math.min(a.length, b.length))
        .every((v, i) => v === b[i]);
}

console.log(sameOrder(["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"])); //  true
console.log(sameOrder(["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Fred", "Jason"])); // false
console.log(sameOrder(["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason"]));         //  true
console.log(sameOrder(["Jason", "Fred", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Jason"]));         // false
console.log(sameOrder(["Jason", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"]));          // false
console.log(sameOrder(["Jason", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"]));          //  true

0

const sameSequence = (array1, array2) => {
  const longest = array1.length > array2.length ? array1 : array2;
  const shortest = array1.length <= array2.length ? array1 : array2;
  return shortest.every((item, index) => item === longest[index]);
};

array1 = console.log(sameSequence(["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"]));
array1 = console.log(sameSequence(["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Fred", "Jason"]));
array1 = console.log(sameSequence(["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"],  ["Bob", "Jason"]));
array1 = console.log(sameSequence(["Jason", "Fred", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Jason"]));
array1 = console.log(sameSequence(["Jason", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"]));
array1 = console.log(sameSequence(["Jason", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"]));

0

if I continue with your approach, the following function works

function matchArrays(arr1, arr2){

    //First result is true

    var result= true;

    //Get minimum length
    var iteration= Math.min(arr1.length, arr2.length);

    //For loop
    for(var i = 0; i<iteration;i++){

       //if not matched
       if(arr1[i]!=arr2[i]){
         result=false;
         break;
       }
    }
    return result;
}

array1 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"];
array2 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"]; // true
document.write(matchArrays(array1, array2));
document.writeln("<br>");
//or

array1 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"];
array2 = ["Bob", "Fred", "Jason"]; // False
document.write(matchArrays(array1, array2));
document.writeln("<br>");
//or 

array1 = ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"];
array2 = ["Bob", "Jason"];         // True
document.write(matchArrays(array1, array2));
document.writeln("<br>");
//or 

array1 = ["Jason", "Fred", "Bob"];
array2 = ["Bob", "Jason"];         // False
document.write(matchArrays(array1, array2));
document.writeln("<br>");
//or 

array1 = ["Jason", "Bob"];
array2 = ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"];  // False
document.write(matchArrays(array1, array2));
document.writeln("<br>");
//or 

array1 = ["Jason", "Bob"];
array2 = ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"];  // True
document.write(matchArrays(array1, array2));
document.writeln("<br>");

function matchArrays(arr1, arr2){
	var result= true;
	var iteration= Math.min(arr1.length, arr2.length);
    for(var i = 0; i<iteration;i++){
    	if(arr1[i]!=arr2[i]){
        	result=false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

0

This code will help you to find the order of the array.checkOrder function will return true if the array is in same order and return false if both the array are not in order.

let v = ['bathri','nathan',2];
let x = ['bathri','nathan'];
let value = [];

let checkOrder = function(one, two){

  if(one.length != two.length){
     value = one.length < two.length ? one : two;
  }
  else{
    value = one;
  }
  
  for(let i = 0; i < value.length; i++){
    if(v[i] != x[i])
    {
      return false;
      break;
    }
  }
  return true;
}

console.log(checkOrder(v,x));


Edit from Leaf

Thanks for your contribution but it does not help :-\

N = !(Y = true);

// tests[3 * i] = expected result
// tests[3 * i + 1] = array A
// tests[3 * i + 2] = array B

tests = [
  N, "BAA".split(""), "ABA".split(""),
  N, "ABA".split(""), "BAA".split(""),
  Y, "ABA".split(""), "BA+".split(""),
  Y, "BA+".split(""), "ABA".split(""),
  Y, "ABACD".split(""), "BADCD".split(""),
  Y, "ABACDDCABA".split(""), "BADCDDCDAB".split(""),
  Y, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"],
  N, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Fred", "Jason"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason"],
  N, ["Jason", "Fred", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Jason"],
  Y, ["Jason", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"],
  N, ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  N, ["Sue", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  N, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Bob", "Sue"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Sue", "Bob"]
];

for (i = 0; i < tests.length; i += 3) {
  a = tests[i + 1];
  b = tests[i + 2];
  shouldMatch = tests[i];
  doesMatch = checkOrder(a, b);
  console.log(
    shouldMatch ? "Y" : "N",
    doesMatch ? "Y" : "N",
    JSON.stringify(a),
    JSON.stringify(b)
  );
}

function checkOrder (one, two) {
  if (one.length != two.length) {
    value = one.length < two.length ? one : two;
  } else {
    value = one;
  }
  for (let i = 0; i < value.length; i++) {
    if (one[i] != two[i]) {
      return false;
      break;
    }
  }
  return true;
}

  • I've edited your answer to show you that your function does not give the expected results (lines with "Y N" or "N Y" are failures). More details here: stackoverflow.com/a/55153120/1636522. – leaf Mar 17 at 17:27
0

Clarifications

This section contains extracts from a discussion between me and the OP (Original Poster).

First we redefined the problem like so:

ME: So you want to compare the order of common elements?

OP: If that's what it is called, yes. Keeping in mind that names can repeat in either or both arrays. We're trying to detect if there is an inversion happening, even though there may be extraneous elements.

Then we reduced the problem to comparing the order of common letters between two words:

OP: [CUT] "AB" == "ACB", "AB" == "ABC", "AB" == "CAB", "AB" !== "BCA", "AB" !== "CBA", "AB" !== "BAC"

Finally the OP posted the following suggestion:

OP: I think the simplest way is to detect those elements that don't appear in the other array and remove them. Do that in the inverse direction, then do the comparison (removing C). I just don't know how to do that.

I haven't tried yet, but I think it's quite close to the first algorithm below since it will simply ignore elements that are not in the other array.

Algorithm #1

The idea is to read the arrays from left to right removing pairs of common elements, then to check if there is still common elements in the remaining set.

Warning. Fails with "ABACD" and "BADCD".

Note 1. This counter-example is interesting since it reveals that whatever the order of the parameters given to the match function, we miss a valid pair of arrays.

Note 2. Iterating in the opposite way works in this case, but using palindromes we can show that it does not always help, for example, "ABACDDCABA" and "BADCDDCDAB".

Note 3. If we drop the first letter of "ABACD", the algorithm gives the expected result, which suggests that a recursive approach might be appropriate.

A picture is worth a thousand words:

a = "ABA", b = "BA" => a[i] != b[j] => x = 0b000, y = 0b00
     ^          ^                              ^         ^
     i          j                              i         j

a = "ABA", b = "BA" => a[i] == b[j] => x = 0b001, y = 0b10
     ^           ^                             ^        ^
     i           j                             i        j
> | a.split("").filter(function (_, i) {
  |   return bit(i, x) === 0;
  | })
< | ["B", "A"]
> | b.split("").filter(function (_, i) {
  |   return bit(i, y) === 0;
  | })
< | ["B"]

If the final arrays contain common elements we would say that there is an inversion. In this case we have to swap the original arrays to compare them once more:

a = "BA", b = "ABA" => a[i] != b[j] => x = 0b00, y = 0b000
     ^         ^                              ^          ^
     i         j                              i          j

a = "BA", b = "ABA" => a[i] == b[j] => x = 0b01, y = 0b010
     ^          ^                             ^         ^
     i          j                             i         j

a = "BA", b = "ABA" => a[i] == b[j] => x = 0b11, y = 0b110
      ^          ^                           ^         ^
      i          j                           i         j
> | a.split("").filter(function (_, i) {
  |   return bit(i, x) === 0;
  | })
< | []
> | b.split("").filter(function (_, i) {
  |   return bit(i, y) === 0;
  | })
< | ["A"]

Considering the last result, we would say that "ABA" and "BA" match your criteria.

fails = 0;
N = !(Y = true)

// tests[3 * i] = expected result
// tests[3 * i + 1] = array A
// tests[3 * i + 2] = array B

tests = [
  N, "BAA".split(""), "ABA".split(""),
  N, "ABA".split(""), "BAA".split(""),
  Y, "ABA".split(""), "BA+".split(""),
  Y, "BA+".split(""), "ABA".split(""),
  Y, "ABACD".split(""), "BADCD".split(""),
  Y, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"],
  N, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Fred", "Jason"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason"],
  N, ["Jason", "Fred", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Jason"],
  Y, ["Jason", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"],
  N, ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  N, ["Sue", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  N, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Bob", "Sue"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Sue", "Bob"]
];

for (i = 0; i < tests.length; i += 3) {
  a = tests[i + 1];
  b = tests[i + 2];
  shouldMatch = tests[i];
  doesMatch = match(a, b) || match(b, a);
  if (shouldMatch !== doesMatch) fails++;
  console.log(
    shouldMatch ? "Y" : "N",
    doesMatch ? "Y" : "N",
    JSON.stringify(a),
    JSON.stringify(b)
  );
}

console.log(
  "fails =", fails
);

function bit (i, n) {
  return n >> i & 1;
}

function match (a, b) {
  var offset = 0, x = 0, y = 0;
  for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
    for (var j = offset; j < b.length; j++) {
      if (a[i] === b[j]) {
        x += 1 << i;
        y += 1 << j;
        offset = j + 1;
        j = b.length; // break
      }
    }
  }
  a = a.filter(function (_, i) {
    return bit(i, x) === 0;
  });
  b = b.filter(function (_, i) {
    return bit(i, y) === 0;
  });
  return !a.some(function (x) {
    return b.some(function (y) {
      return x === y;
    });
  });
}

Algorithm #2

Warning. The correctness of this algorithm must be verified (no counter-example so far).

The idea is to compare every combinations of N elements taken K, with K going from N to 0.

Specific case

Let's focus on the specific case where N = 3 and K = 2. To keep the code simple, I've padded the smallest word with a + sign in order to start with words of the same length:

rmDots = w => w.replace(/\.+/g, ""); // dots remover
a = "ABA"; b = "BA+"; // words
n = 3; // words length

for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
  for (j = 0; j < n; j++) {
    // explode `a` and `b`
    x = a.split("");
    y = b.split("");
    // hide one letter starting
    // from the rightmost one
    x[n - (i + 1)] = ".";
    y[n - (j + 1)] = ".";
    // implode `a` and `b`
    x = x.join("");
    y = y.join("");
    // print out
    console.log(
      // match ? "Yes" : "No"
      rmDots(x) === rmDots(y) ? "Y" : "N",
      JSON.stringify(x), JSON.stringify(y)
    );
  }
}

After that you have to check the pairs of matching combinations to filter the ones with no remaining common letters. For example, with "ABA" and "BAA", and with K = 2 (and N = 3, since N is the length of the strings), you get 3 pairs of matching combinations:

Y "A.A" ".AA"
Y ".BA" "BA."
Y ".BA" "B.A"

However, there is always one remaining letter in common (behind the dots), respectively, ".B." and "B..", "A.." and "..A", and "A.." and ".A.". Therefore, with K = 2, there is actually no pair of combinations matching your criteria, and you have to try again with K = 1.

Generalization

The following code snippet should help to understand the final algorithm:

function C (n, k) {
  var acc = 1, i = 0;
  while (++i <= k) acc *= (n - k + i) / i;
  return acc;
}

function Ci (n, k, i) {
  var j, c, flags = new Array(n);
  for (j = 1; j <= n; j++) {
    if (k > 0 && (c = C(n - j, k - 1)) > i) {
      k -= 1; flags[j - 1] = true;
    } else {
      i -= c; flags[j - 1] = false;
    }
  }
  return flags;
}

/* ignore this line */ (function(){for(var n=/^ */,e=">",t="<",r="!",o="+",i=Array.prototype.map,l=Array.prototype.slice,a=document.getElementsByTagName("pre"),u=0,c=arguments.length;u<c;u++)a[u].innerHTML=i.call(arguments[u],function(n){return p(n[0])+f(n[2])+s(n[1])}).join("");function p(t){var r=t.split("\n"),o=r[0].match(n)[0].length;return y(e,d(r.map(function(n){return n.slice(o)}).join("\n")))}function s(n){return n instanceof Error?y(r,g("#F00",n+"")):y(t,void 0===n?g("#999","undefined"):d(JSON.stringify(n)))}function f(n){return n.reduce(function(n,e){var t="string"!=typeof e[0],r=l.call(e).map(function(n){return"string"!=typeof n||t?JSON.stringify(n):n}).join(" ");return n+y(o,t?d(r):r)},"")}function y(n,e){return'<span style="display:block"><span style="display:inline-block">'+e.split("\n").map(function(e,t){return(0===t?n:" ")+" | "}).join("\n")+'</span><span style="display:inline-block">'+e+"</span></span>"}function g(n,e){return"<span "+('style="color:'+n+'"')+">"+e+"</span>"}function d(n){return"<code>"+n+"</code>"}}).apply(this,eval("["+function(){var n=/("|\\)/g,e=/^.*?\n|\n.*?$/g,t=Array.prototype.map,r=Array.prototype.filter,o=document.getElementsByTagName("pre");return t.call(o,function(t){return"["+r.call(t.childNodes,function(n){return 8===n.nodeType&&n.nodeValue.split("\n").length>2}).map(function(t){return["function(b,i,o){","return console.log=b[0],[","i,o,b[1]","];","}(function(f,l){","return console.log=function(){","return l.push(arguments),(","f.apply(console,arguments)",");","},[f,l];","}(console.log,[]),",t=JSON.stringify(t.nodeValue.replace(e,"")),',eval("try{',"eval(",t.replace(n,"\\$1"),")",'}catch(e){e}"))'].join("")}).join(",")+"]"}).join(",")}()+"]"));
/* ignore this line */ body{padding:1em !important}html,body{min-width:auto !important}
<link href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Shared/stacks.css?v=58428843e325" rel="stylesheet"/>
<link href="https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/stackoverflow/primary.css?v=2ed743cc91af" rel="stylesheet"/>
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<blockquote>
  <p><strong>Help.</strong> Run this snippet then press "Full page".</p>
</blockquote>
<blockquote>
  <p><strong>Help.</strong> <code>&gt;</code> = "input", <code>&lt;</code> = "output", <code>+</code> = "log".</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Taking 2 things among 3:</p>
<pre>
<!--
n = 3
--><!--
k = 2
--><!--
Ci(n, k, 0) // 1st combination
--><!--
Ci(n, k, 2) // 3rd combination
-->
</pre>
<p>Enumerating combinations:</p>
<pre>
<!--
c = C(n, k) // how many combinations?
--><!--
for (i = 0; i < c; i++) {
  console.log(i, Ci(n, k, i));
}
-->
</pre>
<p>Hiding 2 letters among 3:</p>
<pre>
<!--
letters = "ABC".split("")
--><!--
for (i = 0; i < c; i++) {
  flags = Ci(n, k, i);
  console.log(i, letters.map(function (letter, i) {
    var hide = flags[i];
    return hide ? "." : letter;
  }).join(""), flags);
}
-->
</pre>
<p>Taking 2 letter among 3:</p>
<pre>
<!--
letters = "XYZ".split("")
--><!--
for (i = 0; i < c; i++) {
  flags = Ci(n, k, i);
  console.log(i, letters.filter(function (_, i) {
    var take = flags[i];
    return take;
  }).join(""), flags);
}
-->
</pre>

Please keep in mind that this is a brute force approach. There are C(n,k) * C(n,k) possible pairs of combinations for each K (refer to Wikipedia for details about C(n,k)), therefore, the time it takes to compare the strings might grow exponentially (C(n,k)^2) regarding the size of the strings (n). In other words, big strings might exhaust your CPU...

fails = 0;
N = !(Y = true);

// tests[3 * i] = expected result
// tests[3 * i + 1] = array A
// tests[3 * i + 2] = array B

tests = [
  N, "BAA".split(""), "ABA".split(""),
  N, "ABA".split(""), "BAA".split(""),
  Y, "ABA".split(""), "BA+".split(""),
  Y, "BA+".split(""), "ABA".split(""),
  Y, "ABACD".split(""), "BADCD".split(""),
  Y, "ABACDDCABA".split(""), "BADCDDCDAB".split(""),
  Y, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"],
  N, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Fred", "Jason"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Jason", "Fred"], ["Bob", "Jason"],
  N, ["Jason", "Fred", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Jason"],
  Y, ["Jason", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"],
  N, ["Jason", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  N, ["Sue", "Bob"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue"], ["Jason", "Bob", "Sue"],
  N, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Bob", "Sue"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"],
  Y, ["Bob", "Sue", "Bob"], ["Sue", "Bob"]
];

for (i = 0; i < tests.length; i += 3) {
  a = tests[i + 1];
  b = tests[i + 2];
  shouldMatch = tests[i];
  doesMatch = match(a, b);
  if (shouldMatch !== doesMatch) fails++;
  console.log(
    shouldMatch ? "Y" : "N",
    doesMatch ? "Y" : "N",
    JSON.stringify(a),
    JSON.stringify(b)
  );
}

console.log(
  "fails =", fails
);

function C (n, k) {
  var acc = 1, i = 0;
  while (++i <= k) acc *= (n - k + i) / i;
  return acc;
}

function Ci (n, k, i) {
  var j, c, flags = new Array(n);
  for (j = 1; j <= n; j++) {
    if (k > 0 && (c = C(n - j, k - 1)) > i) {
      k -= 1; flags[j - 1] = true;
    } else {
      i -= c; flags[j - 1] = false;
    }
  }
  return flags;
}

function match (a, b) {
  var n, c, i, j;
  var k; // drop `k` elements
  var a2, b2, a3, b3, aFlags, bFlags;
  n = Math.max(a.length, b.length);
  if (a.length < n) a = a.concat(
    new Array(n - a.length).fill(null)
  );
  if (b.length < n) b = b.concat(
    new Array(n - b.length).fill(null)
  );
  for (k = 0; k < n; k++) {
    c = C(n, k);
    for (i = 0; i < c; i++) {
      aFlags = Ci(n, k, i);
      a2 = a.filter(function (_, i) {
        return !aFlags[i];
      });
      for (j = 0; j < c; j++) {
        bFlags = Ci(n, k, j);
        b2 = b.filter(function (_, i) {
          return !bFlags[i];
        });
        // a2[i] = b2[i] (i in [0-(n-k)])
        // means that we found the biggest
        // sequence of common elements.
        // Therefore, we can stop searching
        // and check if there is at least
        // one pair of common elements
        // in the remaining set.
        if (a2.every(function (x, i) {
          return x === b2[i];
        })) {
          a3 = a.filter(function (_, i) {
            return aFlags[i];
          });
          b3 = b.filter(function (_, i) {
            return bFlags[i];
          });
          return !a3.some(function (x) {
            return b3.some(function (y) {
              return x === y;
            });
          });
        }
      }
    }
  }
  return false;
}

Note that I pad the smallest array with null values to start with arrays of the same length. It can be a problem if the arrays already contain null values, but finding a workaround is not a big deal.

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