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I have a query where I'm determining an overall status for a particular day, based on aggregating data by a UTC date in BigQuery, so that the resulting data will have this form:

date            status
----            ------
28-feb-2019     0
01-mar-2019     1

Here's the query, where sample_date_time is the UTC date in BigQuery. @startDateTime and @endDateTime are currently passed as UTC dates that always represent a UTC day boundary e.g.

@startDateTime = '2019-02-28T00:00:00.000Z'

@endDateTime = '2019-03-01T00:00:00.000Z'

select CAST(sample_date_time AS DATE) as date,
       (case when sum(case when status_code >> 0 = 0 then 1 else 0 end) > 0 
             then 0 
        else 
             case when sum(case when status_code >> 0 = 1 then 1 else 0 end) = 1
             then 1
             end
        end) as status 
from (
  with data as
    (
      select
        sample_date_time,
        status_code
      from `my.table` 
      where sample_date_time between @startDateTime and @endDateTime
      order by sample_date_time
    )

  select sample_date_time, status_code
  from data
)
group by date
order by date

I need to convert my query so that it can instead aggregate the data based on day boundaries for a given timezone. The query should return an ordered sequence with a column that represents the day number relative to the given timezone and the supplied date range. To clarify, I need the data to take the following form:

day            status
----           ------
1              0
2              1

@startDateTime and @endDateTime will be passed as ISO_8601 dates that will always represent a day boundary in a given timezone, and will be in the format that supplies the timezone offset relative to UTC e.g. :

@startDateTime = '2019-02-28T00:00:00+11:00'

@endDateTime = '2019-03-01T00:00:00+11:00'

So, the status for day 1 will be aggregated between 2019-02-28T00:00:00+11:00 and 2019-03-01T00:00:00+11:00

Assuming that I can pass the offset into the query as a parameter, and that efficiency isn't a significant consideration (I'm looking for a quick solution in a self-contained query), how can I perform the grouping, and return the day number?

BigQuery doesn't appear to have a convert function, so I don't appear to be able to use something like this in my group by:

group by convert(sample_date_time, dateadd(hours, offset, sample_date_time))

Any advice on what I should be looking at to achieve this is appreciated.

2

I would convert the date in the database using a timezone. Personally, I do this a lot:

select date(sample_date_time, 'America/New_York') as dte, count(*)
from t
group by dte;

This is just intended as an example. Your query is clearly more complex.

  • Thanks @Gordon Linoff. What's that date construct you're using? I don't see it mentioned here - cloud.google.com/bigquery/docs/reference/standard-sql/…. It also doesn't match the definition of a date datetype, or any of the data functions for SQL Server - docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/functions/…. – Chris Halcrow Mar 13 at 1:52
  • 1
    @ChrisHalcrow . . . For example . . . select DATE(CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 'America/New_York'). This assumes that your value is stored as a timestamp. Your question is tagged BigQuery. This is standard SQL. – Gordon Linoff Mar 13 at 2:05
  • Why use the abbreviation dte? Does it has some significance in its meaning? – Chris Halcrow Mar 13 at 5:20
  • 1
    @ChrisHalcrow . . . date is a data type and keyword in SQL. I prefer not to use it for identifiers. – Gordon Linoff Mar 13 at 10:39
1

Thanks to @Gordon Linoff for the simple, elegant solution to this, which allows me to keep the data in this form, but with the dates converted to be relative to the required timezone i.e. :

date (in specified TZ)    status
----------------------    ------
28-feb-2019               0
01-mar-2019               1

Here's my final query. It's based on having the time_zone available as a column in my data. It also relies on the start and end datetime range being supplied in a localised time expression, using the following ISO8601 format:

`yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss+hh:mm`

(the final +hh:mm represents the timezone relative offset that has been applied to the initial datetime expression i.e. the yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm)

select date(localised_sample_date_time) as localised_date,
       (case when sum(case when status_code >> 0 = 0 then 1 else 0 end) > 0 
             then 0 
        else 
             case when sum(case when status_code >> 0 = 1 then 1 else 0 end) = 1
             then 1
             end
        end) as status 
from (
  with data as
    (
      select
        DATETIME(sample_date_time,time_zone)as localised_sample_date_time,
        status_code
      from `my.table` 
      where sample_date_time between '2019-03-01T00:00:00.000+1:00' and '2019-03-02T23:59:59.000+1:00' -- get data for the the 1st March (relative to Central European Standard Time i.e. UTC+1)
      order by sample_date_time
    )

  select localised_sample_date_time, status_code
  from data
)
group by localised_date
order by localised_date

time_zone = valid BigQuery timezone e.g. 'Australia/Victoria' - see https://cloud.google.com/dataprep/docs/html/Supported-Time-Zone-Values_66194188

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