1

Could anyone please suggest any faster way to multiply matrix to vector inside this function?

  inline void multiply(
        std::vector< std::vector<double> > &matrix,
        std::vector<double> &vector,
        std::vector<double> &result
    ){
        int size = (int) vector.size();

        result.resize(size);

        #pragma omp parallel for
        for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i){
              int j = 0;

            for(; j <= size - 16; j += 16){
                result[i] += matrix[i][j] * vector[j]
                    + matrix[i][j + 1] * vector[j + 1]
                    + matrix[i][j + 2] * vector[j + 2]
                    + matrix[i][j + 3] * vector[j + 3]
                    + matrix[i][j + 4] * vector[j + 4]
                    + matrix[i][j + 5] * vector[j + 5]
                    + matrix[i][j + 6] * vector[j + 6]
                    + matrix[i][j + 7] * vector[j + 7]
                    + matrix[i][j + 8] * vector[j + 8]
                    + matrix[i][j + 9] * vector[j + 9]
                    + matrix[i][j + 10] * vector[j + 10]
                    + matrix[i][j + 11] * vector[j + 11]
                    + matrix[i][j + 12] * vector[j + 12]
                    + matrix[i][j + 13] * vector[j + 13]
                    + matrix[i][j + 14] * vector[j + 14]
                    + matrix[i][j + 15] * vector[j + 15];
            }

            for(; j < size; ++j){
                result[i] += matrix[i][j] * vector[j];
            }
        }
    }

This function is called a great number of times during the runtime, so it has a very critical influence for total computation time.

  • 4
    Even if it's "called [a] great number of times", have you measured and profiled that this really is a bottleneck in your program? Always measure before manual optimization. And always build with optimizations enabled before measuring. And remember that "good enough" often is good enough. And when you do manual optimization, remember that it often makes the code quite obfuscated, so good documentation (comments) is a must. Lastly, modern compilers are very good at optimizations, including loop unrolling. – Some programmer dude Mar 13 at 10:56
  • 1
    code appears to be bugged in that result is not guaranteed to be set to zero at function start. – john Mar 13 at 10:59
  • 2
    You could use Eigen. – Fantastic Mr Fox Mar 13 at 10:59
  • 4
    std::vector< std::vector<double> > is not (I'm told) particularly efficient. It's better to have a a 1d vector and manipulate the indexes to it. – john Mar 13 at 11:00
  • 2
    Just curious: did your manual chunking into blocks of size 16 turn out to be faster than a simple for (j=0; j < size; ++j)? I would expect a modern compiler to optimize that itself. – sebrockm Mar 13 at 11:36
0

Depending on you hardware, using GPU parallelization (ex: CUDA) might help substantially.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.