2

Motivation, if it helps: : I have struct member functions that are radial-basis-function kernels. They are called 1e06 x 15 x 1e05 times in a numerical simulation. Counting on devirtualization to inline virtual functions is not something I want to do for that many function calls. Also, the structs (RBF kernels) are already used as template parameters of a larger interpolation class.

Minimal working example

I have a function g() that is always the same, and I want to reuse it, so I pack it in the base class.

The function g() calls a function f() that is different in derived classes.

I don't want to use virtual functions to resolve the function names at runtime, because this incurs additional costs (I measured it in my code, it has an effect).

Here is the example:

#include <iostream>

struct A 
{
    double f() const { return 0; };

    void g() const
    {
        std::cout << f() << std::endl; 
    }
};

struct B : private A
{
    using A::g; 
    double f() const { return 1; };
};

struct C : private A
{
    using A::g;
    double f() const { return 2; };
};

int main()
{
    B b; 
    C c; 

    b.g(); // Outputs 0 instead of 1 
    c.g(); // Outputs 0 instead of 2
}

I expected the name resolution mechanism to figure out I want to use "A::g()", but then to return to "B" or "C" to resolve the "f()" function. Something along the lines: "when I know a type at compile time, I will try to resolve all names in this type first, and do a name lookup from objects/parents something is missing, then go back to the type I was called from". However, it seems to figure out "A::g()" is used, then it sits in "A" and just picks "A::f()", even though the actual call to "g()" came from "B" and "C".

This can be solved using virtual functions, but I don't understand and would like to know the reasoning behind the name lookup sticking to the parent class when types are known at compile time.

How can I get this to work without virtual functions?

  • To make polymorphism work in C++, you first of all need to make the polymorphic functions virtual. Then you need to use pointers or references to the base class, as in A* b = new B; If you want compile-time polymorphism there are ways around that, but it's a lot more work and makes your code much more complicated (and therefore harder to read, understand and maintain). – Some programmer dude Mar 13 at 11:32
  • It would be pretty confusing if A would be a large class, sort of hidden (e.g. from a library) and someone that extends it implements some random function that because of luck or coding standards matches something from A. The whole behavior of A might suddenly change. – Paul92 Mar 13 at 11:33
  • @Paul92: if A is in a library, and I extend B in my library with a member function that shadows a function from A, and the call resolves to this new function in B, that is exactly what I would expect to happen. :) – tmaric Mar 13 at 11:37
  • Also remember that inheritance is a one way relationship. If you call a member function in A, then it doesn't really know anything about possible child-classes. Virtual dispatch is a workaround for that problem, which solves it at run-time. – Some programmer dude Mar 13 at 11:37
  • 1
    That is very crucial information that should have been in the question itself from the very beginning. We really shouldn't have to drag information from you like this in comments. Knowing why you want to do something is really crucial for out understanding, and how we will and can help you. Just asking about a solution, without mentioning the problem it's supposed to solve, makes a question an XY problem. – Some programmer dude Mar 13 at 11:51
5

This is a standard task for the CRTP. The base class needs to know what the static type of the object is, and then it just casts itself to that.

template<typename Derived>
struct A
{
    void g() const
    {
        cout << static_cast<Derived const*>(this)->f() << endl;
    }
};

struct B : A<B>
{
    using A::g; 
    double f() const { return 1; };
};

Also, responding to a comment you wrote, (which is maybe your real question?),

can you tell me what is the reasoning for the name lookup to stick to the base class, instead of returning to the derived class once it looked up g()?

Because classes are intended to be used for object-oriented programming, not for code reuse. The programmer of A needs to be able to understand what their code is doing, which means subclasses shouldn't be able to arbitrarily override functionality from the base class. That's what virtual is, really: A giving its subclasses permission to override that specific member. Anything that A hasn't opted-in to that for, they should be able to rely on.

Consider in your example: What if the author of B later added an integer member which happened to be called endl? Should that break A? Should B have to care about all the private member names of A? And if the author of A wants to add a member variable, should they be able to do so in a way that doesn't potentially break some subclass? (The answers are "no", "no", and "yes".)

  • Thank you for answering the other part as well! I can turn your question around, maybe it helps to show my perspective. By implementing B, I am specializing A in a hierarchy (that is also the case when virtual is used). I am then surprised, that when I use B b; b.g();, the class A arbitrarily overrides f() ,simply because it shares g() with its derived classes. :) Why is this direction OK in the language, and the other one isn't? I would expect that the most specialized (down in the hierarchy) object is used. – tmaric Mar 13 at 12:55
  • Also, if endl is added to B, how can it break A under these rules, when A a; A.g(); is called? Under these rules, everything is first found in A. For A, there is no base, so there is a compile error because the name lookup didn't find something in this case. Otherwise, its base is searched for endl, endl is found and resolved in A and not the base. – tmaric Mar 13 at 12:56
  • "Should B have to care about all the private member names of A?": It can't and doesn't if they are private. – tmaric Mar 13 at 13:00

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