23

I am comparing zip codes.

I have three constants of zip codes :

ZIP_MORRIS
ZIP_UNION
ZIP_ESSEX

I want to see if a user has in an Object's array, all the zips included in one of those.

I tried this:

ZIP_UNION.sort{|x,y| y <=> x} <=> Email.find(3).distributions.map(&:zip_code).uniq.compact.sort{|x,y| y <=> x}

But unfortunately, this just maps all the zip codes, so if I were to choose one extra zip in a different county, then it would not properly compare them.

I think the best solution would be to compare the values of the User Generated Zips, and see if all of the zips in one ZIP_COUNTY are present inside the array.

Some kind of iterator that would run through all the zips and ensure that the user's zip do or do not include every single zip in a zip group.

Any ideas?

76

You can do array differences, if the result is the empty array, the 2 arrays contained the same elements:

>> [1,2,3]-[3,1,2] #=> []

If you still have elements left, then not all elements of the first array were present in the second one:

>> [1,2,5]-[3,1,2] #=> [5]
  • 4
    Simplicity takes the cake. – Trip Apr 1 '11 at 13:51
  • 1
    @Trip: Simplicity out of necessity. In our app I often have to do something very similar with ID arrays of up to several hundred thousand elements. All other methods proved to be too slow. – Michael Kohl Apr 1 '11 at 13:53
  • 15
    This solution works for the specific example in the @Trip's question, but not for the general case. You'll need to do the difference operation twice: # where the number of elements do not match [1] - [1,2] #=> [] [1,2] - [1] #=> [2] # where there are dups within elements [1,1,2] - [2,2,1] #=> [] [2,2,1] - [1,1,2] #=> [] – bobics Sep 25 '12 at 17:56
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    @bobics I upvoted your comment, but it was also posted as an answer to Trip's question, not to the general case. – Michael Kohl Sep 25 '12 at 22:50
  • 2
    first check the length! – penner Sep 16 '13 at 20:26
8

Below I'm using the all? operator on an array, which will return true if all of the items in the array return true for the block I'm passing in.

my_zip = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
[2,3,5].all?{|z| my_zip.include?(z)}
=> true 
[20,3,5].all?{|z| my_zip.include?(z)}
=> false

You'd just change it up to be the user's zip codes

  • Almost.. I do have all of them selected so it should render true. But it doesn't. I'm assuming because it's also including other zips that are not necessarily in my_zip and thinking no. – Trip Apr 1 '11 at 13:46
  • 1
    Depending on the length of the 2 arrays, this could be very slow. – Michael Kohl Apr 1 '11 at 13:47
6
> [1,2,3] <=> [1,2,3]
=> 0
> [1,2,3] <=> [2,2,3]
=> -1
> [1,2,3] <=> [3,2,3]
=> -1
> [1,2,3] <=> [1,3,3]
=> -1
> [1,2,3] <=> [1,1,3]
=> 1

this is from RailsThinker Post and has been working for me very well.

  • Thanks!, Great operator, especially when you want to compare semantic versions ! – MhdSyrwan Jan 5 '16 at 13:02

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