2

I've a parent and a child processes. In the parent I established a signal handler for a SIGCHLD. I send SIGTSTP signal to the child, that trigers SIGCHLD and in SIGCHLD siganl handler in parent I call wait function to get a status of the stopped child. But instead of returning immediately it blocks. Then I send a SIGCONT signal to the child and wait returns with errno set to Interuppted system call. I can't understand what I'm missing.

pid_t pid;


static void sig_chld(int signo);


int main() {

    struct sigaction act, savechld;
    sigemptyset(&act.sa_mask);
    act.sa_flags = 0;


    act.sa_handler = sig_chld;
    if (sigaction(SIGCHLD, &act, &savechld) < 0){
        return errno;
    }

    pid = fork();
    switch (pid){
        case -1:{
            perror("fork failed");
            return errno;
        }
        case 0:{    //child
            if (sigaction(SIGCHLD, &savechld, NULL) < 0)
                return errno;

            execlp(path, name_of_executable, (char*)NULL);
            return errno;
        }
        default:{
            for (;;)
                pause();
        }
    }
    return 0;
}



void sig_chld(int signo) {
    int statol;
    if (wait(&statol) < 0){
        perror("waitt error");
        exit(errno);
    }

    if (WIFSTOPPED(statol)){
        puts("Child is stopped");
    } else if (WIFEXITED(statol)){
        puts("Child exited");
    } else if (WIFCONTINUED(statol)){
        puts("Child continued");
    } else if (WIFSIGNALED(statol)){
        puts("Child is signaled");
        int sig = WTERMSIG(statol);
        psignal(sig, NULL);
    }
}
  • 1
    Not sure what you are confused about. wait blocks the parent until child terminates. Stopped child is not a terminated child. – SergeyA Mar 13 at 17:19
  • 1
    From the man page, it waits for process to change state. – Игорь Корпенко Mar 13 at 17:26
  • You can't safely call anything but async-signal-safe functions in a signal handler. On Linux, the list can be found on the signal-safety man page. None of the functions you are calling - wait(), perror(), exit(), puts(), or psignal() are async-signal-safe. Footnote 188 of the C 11 standard even states: "Thus, a signal handler cannot, in general, call standard library functions." – Andrew Henle Mar 13 at 17:41
  • 1
    @AndrewHenle: Both wait() and waitpid() are listed as async-signal safe in the POSIX description of Signal Concepts. The Linux page you link to also lists both wait() and waitpid() as safe. The C standard is almost impossibly restrictive; it is the bare minimum subset and, for all practical purposes, real systems are never as restrictive as the C standard. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 at 17:45
  • @JonathanLeffler I missed the wait() call. The C standard is almost impossibly restrictive; it is the bare minimum subset and, for all practical purposes, real systems are never as restrictive as the C standard. The point was that without platform-specific documentation that states a library function call can safely be called from within a signal handler, it's unsafe to do so and likely invokes undefined behavior. – Andrew Henle Mar 13 at 23:21
5

You have to use waitpid() instead of wait(), and you need to specify the option WUNTRACED to also have stopped children reported with waitpid(), like this:

if (waitpid(-1, &statol, WUNTRACED) < 0) {

Now waitpid() should return immediately and your macro WIFSTOPPED(&statol) should be true.

  • 2
    You could probably use WNOHANG too — though it probably doesn't matter too much if you don't loop. However, a process can have multiple children (even children that the current program didn't start, but that the program which executed the current one started and didn't wait for), and you might need to collect more than one corpse. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 at 17:49

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